White Cross School Blog

 

NC Literary Hall of Fame

 

 

 

Friday-Sunday
November 2-4
Hilton Charlotte University Place
8629 JM Keynes Drive
Charlotte, NC 28262
(704) 547-7444

 

When booking your hotel reservation, use this link to reserve your room online, or call the hotel at (704) 547-7444 and Group Code NCWN to make reservations at the discounted group rate.
**This hotel is now sold out. For additional accomodation options, click here.**

 

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is closed. On-site registration begins at 3:00 pm on Friday, November 2**

 

FEES AND DEADLINES | COMPLETE SCHEDULE-AT-A-GLANCE | COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

SESSION I | SESSION II | SESSION III | SESSION IV | SESSION V | MASTER CLASSES | CRITIQUE SERVICE | MANUSCRIPT MART | FACULTY BIOGRAPHIES

 

Fees & Deadlines

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is closed. On-site registration begins at 3:00 pm on Friday, November 2**

 

Early registration: On-site registration:

Member Rates

  • $260 (full conference, with meals)
  • $200 (full conference, without meals)
  • $200 (full conference, without workshops)*
  • $210 (Saturday only, with meals)
  • $100 (Sunday only, without meals)

Nonmember Rates

  • $375 (full conference, with meals)
  • $300 (full conference, without meals)
  • $325 (Saturday only, with meals)
  • $200 (Sunday only, without meals)

Other Fees

  • $30 for a Master Class
  • $160 for Manuscript Mart
  • $150 for Critique Service

 

  • $450 (full conference, without meals—for members and nonmembers)
  • $350 (Saturday only, without meals—for members and nonmembers)
  • $250 (Sunday only, without meals—for members and nonmembers)

*This is our “Hangout” rate, for NCWN members who want to come hang out with their friends, enjoy the group meals and general sessions, but not take any classes or workshops.

 

Scholarships

Limited scholarship aid is available for the Fall Conference. To apply, send your current CV and a statement of writing intent—describing your background and goals as a writer—to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

In addition, we offer two scholarships for specific groups:

The Mary Belle Campbell Scholarships are open to applications from poets who teach full-time. For more information, please follow the link above, or e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The Elliott Bowles Screenwriters Scholarships are open to applications from any North Carolina resident who has written an unproduced and unoptioned screenplay. For more information, please follow the link above, or e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The deadline for all scholarship applications is October 12.

 

Cancellations and Refunds

Cancellations must be made in writing and arrive at the Network by 4:00 pm on Friday, October 26, 2018, for you to receive a refund of the registration fee, less 25 percent. No-shows or cancellations after October 26 are nonrefundable.

Manuscript Mart, Critique Service, and Master Class fees are not refundable if you cancel. However, if we are unable to find a place for you in the Manuscript Mart or Critique Service, we will return your check(s) for related extra charge(s).

Master Class application fees are nonrefundable.

Send all refund requests to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Deadlines

 

October 10

Deadline to reserve hotel rooms at low conference rate*
($139 + taxes & fees/night) Please click here or call (704) 547-7444 to make reservations at the discounted group rate

* Conference-rate rooms subject to limited availability, and will be allocated on first-come, first-served basis.

October 12 Deadline for all scholarship applications (Fees & Deadlines)
October 19 Deadline for Master Class registration (see guidelines)
October 19 Deadline for Manuscript Mart / Critique Service registration (see guidelines)
October 26 28! Deadline for early registration (5:00 pm by phone or mail; midnight if registering online). **DEADLINE EXTENDED TO OCTOBER 28!**
November 2-4 On-site registration available at conference
November 2-4 Fall Conference in session

 

For Writers with Special Needs

The North Carolina Writers' Network strives to make our programs and services accessible to all writers, including those with special needs. If you require conference materials either in large print or in Braille, or if you require a sign-language interpreter, please register for the conference and submit your request to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. no later than October 12. If you require any other special assistance, please let us know as soon as possible at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. We will do our best to accommodate all reasonable requests.

 

e-Packets

In an effort to save money, time, and resources, the Network will send to all 2018 Fall Conference registrants, exhibitors, and faculty an e-Packet, prior to November 2. The e-Packet will contain all the usual conference packet materials, in the form of a PDF that registrants can print or download to bring with them to the conference.

Name tags, personalized schedules, and copies of the Schedule-at-a-Glance will still be available at the registration table the day of the conference.

If you prefer to receive a traditional printed packet at the conference, please indicate this preference in the space provided on your registration form.

 

Return to Top

 


 

Complete Schedule-At-A-Glance

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is closed. On-site registration begins at 3:00 pm on Friday, November 2**

 

Friday, November 2

12:00 pm...........Pre-Conference Tailgate with Bryn Chancellor
 (Location: University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Fretwell 290-B
Sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Charlotte Department of English
3:00 – 9:30 pm...........Registration and Book Sales open
5:00 - 9:30 pm..............Exhibitor Tables open
7:00 – 8:00 pm.............Opening Reception (Sponsored by Alice Osborn: Editor/Book Coach/Author)
8:00 – 9:00 pm.............Keynote Address by Randall Kenan
9:00 – 9:30 pm...........Randall Kenan Book Signing

 

Saturday, November 3

7:30 – 9:00 am............Continental Breakfast available
7:30 am – 7:00 pm......Registration, Book Sales and Exhibitor Tables open
8:00 – 9:00 am............All Stories Connect: Does Place Still Matter? with Julie Funderburk, Patrice Gopo, Dannye Romine Powell, and Kim Wright
Sponsored by the Arts & Science Council

9:00 am – 10:30 am......Session I

Dialogue from the Ground Up: Amplifying Place and the Sensory World (Fiction) with Bryn Chancellor
Write What You Don’t Know (CNF) with Georgann Eubanks
Imagery: Source and Function in Poetry with Julie Funderburk
The Perfect Pitch with Kim Boykin, Erika Marks, and Kim Wright
Creative Nonfiction Master Class: How to Get the Words on the Page to Match the Fabulous Vision You Have in Your Head with Judy Goldman**Closed**
Poetry Master Class: The Art and Craft of Polishing a Poem (AKA Re-Vision) with Maureen Ryan Griffin**Closed**
Fiction Master Class: The Gothic Imagination and Good Writing with Randall Kenan**Closed**
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service*

10:30 – 11:00 am...........Break
11:00 am – 12:30 pm.....Session II

The Passion Project: Writing and Selling a Book that Matters with Kathy Izard
The Basics of Writing Compelling Personal Essays with Patrice Gopo
“You Talking to Me?” How Less Really Can Mean More When Writing Dialogue with Susan Rivers
Technology Toolkit: Software and Tech Stuff for Writers with Paul Reali
Creative Nonfiction Master Class: How to Get the Words on the Page to Match the Fabulous Vision You Have in Your Head with Judy Goldman (Cont.) **Closed**
Poetry Master Class: The Art and Craft of Polishing a Poem (AKA Re-Vision) with Maureen Ryan Griffin (Cont.) **Closed**
Fiction Master Class: The Gothic Imagination and Good Writing with Randall Kenan (Cont.)**Closed**
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service*

12:30 – 1:30 pm.........Luncheon featuring the Linda Flowers Literary Award

(Sponsored by the North Carolina Humanities Council)

1:30 – 2:00 pm...........Network Town Hall Meeting
2:00 – 2:30 pm...........Break
2:30 pm – 4:00 pm.....Session III

Scene Sequencing in Novel Structure with Kim Wright
Shut Up and Write (all genre) with Michele T. Berger (Sponsored by Freedom.to
Principles of the Verse Line with Morri Creech
Dramatic Structure, or The Story of My Tattoo with Ian Finley
Creative Nonfiction Master Class: How to Get the Words on the Page to Match the Fabulous Vision You Have in Your Head with Judy Goldman (Cont.)**Closed**
Poetry Master Class: The Art and Craft of Polishing a Poem (AKA Re-Vision) with Maureen Ryan Griffin (Cont.)**Closed**
Fiction Master Class: The Gothic Imagination and Good Writing with Randall Kenan (Cont.)**Closed**
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service*

4:00 – 4:30 pm......Break
4:30 – 5:30 pm......Faculty Readings (Sponsored by The English Department at Davidson College)
6:00 – 7:00 pm......Happy Hour (Sponsored by Odin Law and Media)
7:00 – 8:00 pm......Network Banquet featuring Native, performance and panel discussion
8:30 – 9:30 pm......Open Mic Readings (Sign up at registration table) (Sponsored by Al Manning)

 

Sunday, November 4

7:30 – 9:00 am.............Continental Breakfast available
7:30 am – 1:00 pm.......Registration, Book Sales and Exhibitor Tables open
8:00 – 9:00 am.............Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: "Agents and Editors"

9:00 am – 10:30 am.......Session IV

Worldbuilding: Making Your Setting Come Alive! with Gail Z. Martin
Finding Our Stories from Photographs and Art with Tracy Crow
The Prose Poem: Hybrid Genre or Structural Choice? with Terry L. Kennedy
From the Page to the Stage with Robert Inman
Making a Living as a Writer: Freelancing for Magazines with Jodi Helmer
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service*

10:30 – 11:00 am............Break
11:00 am – 12:30 pm......Session V

Show AND Telling (Fiction) with Sarah Creech
Get People Talking (CNF) with Cynthia Lewis
Nobody Writes Alone: How to be a Well-Versed Citizen of the Poetry World with Lisa Zerkle
Creating Diverse Characters for the Stage, Page, and Screen with Paula Martinac
Understanding the Players in the Book World with Betsy Thorpe
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service*

12:30 – 1:00 pm.............Closing Conversation

 

*by prior registration only

 

Return to Top

 


 

Course Descriptions

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is closed. On-site registration begins at 3:00 pm on Friday, November 2**

 

Friday, November 2

12:00 pm

Pre-Conference Tailgate with Bryn Chancellor
Location: University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Fretwell 290-B

Sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Charlotte Department of English

 

Saturday, November 3

8:00–9:00 am

All Stories Connect: Does Place Still Matter? with Julie Funderburk, Patrice Gopo, Dannye Romine Powell, and Kim Wright
In our global, hyperconnected world—a world with satellites and Google Street View—does a sense of place still matter in writing? What does “place” mean when people are more mobile than ever before? Four Charlotte writers, each of whom took a different path to the Queen City, bring their perspectives to the question.
Sponsored by the Arts & Science Council

 

9:00 – 10:30 am: Session I

Dialogue from the Ground Up: Amplifying Place and the Sensory World (fiction) with Bryn Chancellor
We’ll explore how to enrich and intensify dialogue especially through setting, drawing from Janet Burroway’s assertion that “your fiction must have an atmosphere because without it your characters will be unable to breathe.” We’ll discuss craft techniques and short examples but focus primarily on writing through targeted exercises that can be used to generate new material or develop works in progress.

Write What You Don’t Know (CNF) with Georgann Eubanks
When you use your own curiosity to drive the story, you don’t have to be an expert, you just have to do your homework and bring your readers along! A workshop designed to generate ideas for stories you can sell with tips on finding your sources, interviewing the right subjects, creating tension in the story, and finding your audience. We’ll do a bit of freewriting, too. This workshop is for writers at all levels and will draw upon the expertise of the group so that you leave with at least two ideas to pursue.

Imagery: Source and Function in Poetry with Julie Funderburk
Imagery is an important craft concept for poetry. It is crucial for its evocative invitation to the reader as well as for its role in metaphor. In this session, through examples, we will distinguish between different sources and functions for image—image as description within a poem (of memory, portrait, or landscape) and the image of the imagination. Images help us communicate. What happens when the power is untethered?

The Perfect Pitch with Kim Boykin, Erika Marks, and Kim Wright
It’s one thing to write a book—but it takes a whole other skill set to describe it, especially if you only have a single page to intrigue an agent or editor. Even if writers aren’t pitching this go-round, at some point everyone needs to ask themselves “What’s the major premise of my book?”

In The Perfect Pitch, novelists Kim Boykin, Kim Wright, and Erika Marks—who have collectively published twelve books with Big Five publishers—will give you tips on what makes an effective pitch and how to break your big idea down into a few potent paragraphs. Then we’ll divide into small groups to tweak and practice pitches. By the end of this session you’ll be able to describe your latest work in a concise and compelling way so that when it’s your turn at the Manuscript Mart or the elevator stalls, you’ll be ready!

Creative Nonfiction Master Class: How to Get the Words on the Page to Match the Fabulous Vision You Have in Your Head with Judy Goldman**Closed**
You know how to write. But sometimes it’s hard to get what’s so clear in your mind onto the page, polished and perfect. How do you make those words fall gracefully into place? How do you get the story to come to life on the page? I want to teach you the tips I wish I’d known when I started writing creative nonfiction. Whether you’re writing memoir, essays, travel pieces, etc., my goal is to take you from where you are to where you’d like to be. We’ll focus on structure, pacing, building potent sentences, dialogue strategies, scene vs. summary, use of reflection (what you knew then, what you know now). We’ll talk about finding your story, the narrative arc. I’ll touch on the tricky business of writing about people you love (or don’t love). Oh, and I’ll even throw in a little advice on how to turn self-doubt into an advantage.

Please submit up to 1,500 sequential words from a single work, along with your current CV in a separate attachment, on the same day that you register for the conference. Submissions should be saved in a single MS Word document, using double-spaced 12-point Times New Roman font, with numbered pages, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The title of the work and your name should appear on the submission. The sample you submit will be the work discussed in class, and accepted registrants will be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

Each registrant should be ready to handle the intensive instruction and atmosphere of the Master Class.

The Art and Craft of Polishing a Poem (AKA Re-Vision): Poetry Master Class with Maureen Ryan Griffin **Closed**
What is revision, after all, but bringing a sparkling fresh vision to a piece of writing and its possibilities, the way you would facet, then polish, a gemstone? I once heard gifted poet Linda Pastan speak at length on revision, which she called “the main act of writing.” She writes her first draft by putting herself in a trance-like state, she said. “And then come 100 revisions. It would be wonderful if there were right and wrong choices.” No one can tell us exactly what to do with our work—writing is an art as well as a craft. But while there aren’t right and wrong choices, we can get crystal-clear on our options in the areas of content, sound, and form and understand why—and how—some serve a particular poem better than others. That’s just what you’ll do in this master class—learn and practice specific revision tactics, as well as get detailed feedback/critique on at least one of your poems. You’ll take home a handy reference chart and descriptions of all the strategies covered—which, by the way, can also help you write more brilliant poetry and prose.

Please submit three poems, along with your current CV in a separate attachment, on the same day that you register for the conference. Poems should be saved in a single MS Word document, using single-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Your name and the title of each poem should appear on the submission. Accepted registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

Each registrant should be ready to handle the intensive instruction and atmosphere of the Master Class.

The Gothic Imagination and Good Writing: Fiction Master Class with Randall Kenan**Closed**
Gothic literature is a cornerstone of the Western literary tradition and had a significant impact in forming the American literary tradition. Attentive writers should be aware of certain building blocks we have inherited from the Gothic: a sense of place/locus, active secrets, acute conflict, among other tropes. In this class we will look at examples and techniques from the Gothic—European, American, Southern, and African-American. And focus on techniques to apply them to our current projects.

Please submit up to 1,500 sequential words from a single work, along with your current CV in a separate attachment, on the same day that you register for the conference. Submissions should be saved in a single MS Word document, using double-spaced 12-point Times New Roman font, with numbered pages, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The title of the work and your name should appear on the submission. The sample you submit will be the work discussed in class, and accepted registrants will be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

Each registrant should be ready to handle the intensive instruction and atmosphere of the Master Class.

 

11:00 am – 12:30 pm: Session II

The Passion Project: Writing and Selling a Book that Matters with Kathy Izard
You want to write book. But not just any book—you want to write a book that matters. One that will make readers think and call them to action. The stories you weave will not only tell, they will teach. Along with a great manuscript, you will need to find your tribe—those people who care about what you care about. Who are they and how will you find them? And finally, who will be your publishing partner that encourages you to tell the story just the way you want to write it?

In this course we will discuss:

  • What is a passion project?
  • Why is it different than any book you might write?
  • How to connect to readers and groups that will care about your book
  • And the critical question: self-publish or traditional press

This course is for emerging writers as well as published authors wanting to try a different genre.

The Basics of Writing Compelling Personal Essays with Patrice Gopo
Personal essays are a popular and important way to share deeper thoughts and insights about our lived experience. But how do we write a compelling personal essay? In this workshop, participants will learn the basics of writing an effective and satisfying personal essay. Through examples and writing exercises, we’ll learn how to write about our lived experience in a way that unearths deeper meaning and connects with readers and the broader world.

“You Talking to Me?” How Less Really Can Mean More When Writing Dialogue with Susan Rivers
Fiction can get bogged down in an excess of description and exposition: “telling” rather than “showing.” In filmed and staged texts, no description is possible, and dialogue must do the heavy lifting: providing exposition, character and plot development, and showing conflict. Dialogue can function just as effectively in fiction, while engaging the reader more fully, if it works on multiple levels to define relationships and objectives and is authentic to the character’s time, setting, and situation. Rivers will share techniques with writers for pinpointing the goals of individual speakers in a scene and maximizing the power of subtext, helping participants to turn up the dramatic power in their dialogues.

Technology Toolkit: Software and Tech Stuff for Writers with Paul Reali
Technology giveth and technology taketh away. When trying to find the right tools to support our writing, it seems we spend so much time choosing and learning—then changing and re-learning—that we can’t tell if we’re saving time or wasting it. You don’t have to suffer for your art, at least not where technology is concerned. In this session, Paul will highlight the tools in his tech toolkit that, through extensive trial and error, he has found most useful. Among the topics: Scrivener vs. Microsoft Word (and the seven things that will make you go to Scrivener and never come back); online grammar and proofreading tools; how to back up and never lose your work (external drives, Dropbox, backup services, etc.); and other tools for the tool kit, such as dictation software, timers, and note-takers.

Creative Nonfiction Master Class with Judy Goldman
Cont. See Above.
**Closed**

Poetry Master Classwith Maureen Ryan Griffin
Cont. See Above.
**Closed**

Fiction Master Class with Randall Kenan
Cont. See Above.**Closed**

 

12:30 – 1:30 pm

Luncheon featuring Linda Flowers Literary Award
Please join us as our friends from the North Carolina Humanities Council announce the winner of the 2018 Linda Flowers Literary Award. Sponsored by the North Carolina Humanities Council.

 

1:30 – 2:00 pm

Network Town Hall Meeting

 

2:00 – 2:30 pm

Break

 

2:30 – 4:00 pm: Session III

Scene Sequencing in Novel Structure with Kim Wright
How do you structure a novel? The question may feel overwhelming, but most stories—despite their variations in theme, genre, and subject matter—follow certain “plot beats” that propel the action forward. In this class we’ll explore the ten key scenes upon which a well-crafted story turns, from the opening image to the finale. Not all novelists need an outline—which can sometimes feel confining—but most benefit from crafting a solid story arc before they begin, understanding the essential places where a story turns, expands, and ultimately concludes. If you struggle with plotting and pacing, or have ever bogged down in the dreaded “muddy middle” of your novel, this is the class for you.

Shut Up and Write (all genre) with Michele T. Berger
This session will ask registrants to do exactly that: Shut up, and write. Think of it as study hall, except you’re writing instead of reading (or passing notes—none of that, now). Registrants for this option will get ninety minutes of glorious, uninterrupted silence in which to dream, plan, create, or edit.
Sponsored by Freedom.to.

Principles of the Verse Line with Morri Creech
As James Longenbach has asserted, the fundamental unit of verse is the line: whether metered, syllabic, or in free verse, poems are first shaped by the dynamic element of lineation; even “prose poems” are a reaction to, or against, the line as a defining element of verse. But in what ways can the verse line be an expressive unit in itself? How do poems benefit from this shaping? In this class, we will look at the line as an expressive unit, investigating the effects of the end-stopped line, the parsing line, and the annotating line and their potential to create tensions that reinforce or counter the expressive movement of the sentence. We will also consider some key ideas by John Hollander that help to explain and contextualize the potential effects of enjambment on the English line. We will discuss to what degree these principles contribute to poetic expression in a number of individual poems which we will examine during the class.

Dramatic Structure, or The Story of My Tattoo with Ian Finley
Above all, drama requires conflict. More than in any other form of writing, forces in opposition to each other are the engine of your script (and the way to hold the audience’s interest). Understanding dramatic structure is the key to turning up the conflict, holding your story together, and ultimately developing theme. Useful at every stage of the writing and revising process, dramatic structure is the most valuable tool a writer can wield.

Creative Nonfiction Master Class with Judy Goldman
Cont. See Above.
**Closed**

Poetry Master Classwith Maureen Ryan Griffin
Cont. See Above.
**Closed**

Fiction Master Class with Randall Kenan
Cont. See Above.
**Closed**

 

4:00–4:30 pm

Break

 

4:30–5:30 pm

Faculty Readings
Sponsored by The English Department at Davidson College

 

6:00–7:00 pm

Happy Hour
Sponsored by Odin Law & Media

 

7:00–8:00 pm

Network Banquet featuring Native, performance and panel discussion.  Ian Finley’s play Native explores the relationship and developing tensions between Paul Green and Richard Wright as they try to adapt Wright’s classic novel Native Son for the stage. This special performance will be followed by a panel discussion on the play’s themes, and how writers today still grapple with its questions, featuring Paul Green scholar Margaret Bauer, playwright Ian Finley, NC Poet Laureate Jaki Shelton Green, and Native cast members.

 

8:30–9:30 pm

Open Mic Readings
Sponsored by Al Manning

 

Sunday, November 4

8:00–9:00 am

Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: Agents & Editors
This is your annual chance to ask professional agents and editors your burning questions about queries, submissions, slush piles, and the winding path to publication.

 

9:00 – 10:30 am: Session IV

Worldbuilding: Making Your Setting Come Alive! with Gail Z. Martin
Whether you write contemporary, historical, or futuristic fiction, your setting is an essential “character” in your book. How do you create a believable society from scratch? What are the tricks to using real people, places and historical events without getting yourself in trouble? What must you keep in mind to make a historical setting fresh for readers, or to help them connect with feeling to a futuristic world? Gail Z. Martin writes epic fantasy, urban fantasy, steampunk, and paranormal romance, and she will share her tips and tricks about creating worlds your readers will never forget!

Finding Our Stories from Photographs and Art with Tracy Crow
It’s called Ekphrasis, a Greek word that refers to finding story from art. For this workshop, you’re encouraged to bring a photograph from home or a photo of a piece of art, which could be of a painting, sculpture, carving, etc. We’ll explore how writers not only draw writing inspiration from other forms of art but how they more fully understand themselves through the process of writing about art.

The Prose Poem: Hybrid Genre or Structural Choice? with with Terry L. Kennedy
In this workshop, we’ll discuss the defining characteristics of that once nebulous, but now readily practiced, form: the prose poem. To aid in our understanding of the practice we’ll examine some published pieces in early and final drafts and, time permitting, do a round-robin exercise designed to highlight the strengths and possibilities of your own prose poems. Please bring a hard copy of a prose poem of your own with you to class.

From the Page to the Stage with Robert Inman
Participants will take part in a lively discussion about the challenge of transforming a story meant for a single reader into one crafted for a larger visual audience. We’ll discuss the particular “language” of stage and screen and examine techniques unique to successful stage and screen storytelling.

Making a Living as a Writer: Freelancing for Magazines with Jodi Helmer
If you want to see your name in print but don’t know where to start, this workshop is for you. Learn how to develop ideas for articles, the best way to break in to a publication, the basics of working with an editor and how to stand out from the crowd. We’ll also cover what it takes to take writing from a side hustle to a full-time gig, including tips for securing ongoing work from major publications.

 

10:30–11:00 am

Break

 

11:00 am – 12:30 pm: Session V

Show AND Telling (Fiction) with Sarah Creech
Too often teachers admonish beginning writers with the adage “show, don’t tell” as if it’s a firm rule. And it’s true that writing rendered entirely in exposition fails to create the urgency and vividness of story, but it’s also true that prose writers must tell sometimes, too. So, when do we show and when do we tell? What’s the balance? Which moments demand the sensory experience of scene and which moments need the context that telling can provide? In this class, we will study showing and telling in scenes from classic and contemporary works of literature and discuss the choices writers make. We will participate in writing exercises to better help us apply showing and telling in our creative work.

Get People Talking (CNF) with with Cynthia Lewis
The title of this class is the first sentence in William Zinsser’s chapter on “Writing about People: The Interview” in his gem of a book On Writing Well. This class is indeed about interviewing, a craft that any writer of nonfiction will use at some point. Even a memoirist will need to consult others about the past and acquire factual information from other people. How do you ask for an interview? How do you conduct an interview? What are the ethical considerations a writer should take into account about interviewing? How about practical concerns—should you take notes or use a voice recorder? How do you “get people talking”?

Cynthia will begin the class by sharing some experiences, strategies, and recommendations she’s collected over many years of interviewing subjects for reported creative nonfiction. Then she’ll ask class members to share their experiences with interviewing and ask questions about their own work. Ideally, class members will read Zinsser’s chapter—which should be available in almost any public or school library—before the class meets. Each class member should also be able to refer to an example of interviewing that seems especially well done, as well as a weaker example and ideas about how it could be improved.

Nobody Writes Alone: How to be a Well-Versed Citizen of the Poetry World with Lisa Zerkle
Writing can be a lonely pursuit. This is doubly so for poets. Poetry world is not the land of book tours and bestsellers lists. Still, poetry speaks to us in a necessary and illuminating language found nowhere else. How can we, as poets, build the world we want to write in? How can we find and encourage our tribe? This workshop will break down the three areas (Read, Write, and Engage) crucial for poets who want to be engaged literary citizens.

Creating Diverse Characters for the Stage, Page, and Screen with Paula Martinac
What issues and problems arise when playwrights, screenwriters, and fiction writers create characters whose race, sexual orientation, class, or gender differs from their own? Maybe you’ve been nervous about writing characters who represent the broad spectrum of society, or maybe your early attempts tripped you up. Research, imagination, and empathy go a long way toward making characters dynamic and authentic. In this workshop, we’ll discuss the possible pitfalls of writing diverse characters, explore tips for success, and try out writing exercises to help the process.

Understanding the Players in the Book World with Betsy Thorpe
You want to get published but have no idea how the industry works. How does a book get picked up by a big publisher? Do you need an agent? What happens if your book is not right for a big publisher—are there alternatives? Regional publishers, university presses? What about these “hybrid” book publishers you might have heard of—what does that even mean? Betsy Thorpe has played a role in many of these places—from working at four out of the five “Big Five” publishers, to working ever-so-briefly as a literary agent (who still gets queries fourteen years later) and helping out regional publishers as well as with self-publishing. Please join her as she gives you an introduction to the industry.

 

Return to Top

 


 

Master Classes

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is closed. On-site registration begins at 3:00 pm on Friday, November 2**

 

Master Classes offer intermediate and advanced writers a chance to delve more deeply into a particular genre. Each Master Class will take place over the course of Sessions I, II, and III, and will be limited to the first twelve qualified registrants.

While publication credits are not required, Master Class participants should be experienced writers, dedicated to their craft. Applications will be reviewed, and qualified registrants admitted, on a rolling basis, until the deadline of Friday, October 19.

When you register for a Master Class, please choose another class as a back-up in case you are not admitted to the Master Class.

Please submit your current CV, along with the required manuscript (see each Master Class’s course description, below, for its manuscript requirements), to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., on the same day that you register for the Fall Conference.

Application to a Master Class requires a non-refundable $30 processing fee, in addition to the Fall Conference registration fee. If registering for the conference online or by phone, you can pay this processing fee with a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover. If registering by mail, you must include a separate check for $30.

MASTER CLASS REGISTRATIONS (INCLUDING REQUIRED MANUSCRIPTS) MUST BE RECEIVED THE SAME DAY YOU REGISTER FOR THE CONFERENCE.

How to Get the Words on the Page to Match the Fabulous Vision You Have in Your Head: CNF Master Class with Judy Goldman**Closed**
You know how to write. But sometimes it’s hard to get what’s so clear in your mind onto the page, polished and perfect. How do you make those words fall gracefully into place? How do you get the story to come to life on the page? I want to teach you the tips I wish I’d known when I started writing creative nonfiction. Whether you’re writing memoir, essays, travel pieces, etc., my goal is to take you from where you are to where you’d like to be. We’ll focus on structure, pacing, building potent sentences, dialogue strategies, scene vs. summary, use of reflection (what you knew then, what you know now). We’ll talk about finding your story, the narrative arc. I’ll touch on the tricky business of writing about people you love (or don’t love). Oh, and I’ll even throw in a little advice on how to turn self-doubt into an advantage.

Please submit up to 1,500 sequential words from a single work, along with your current CV in a separate attachment, on the same day that you register for the conference. Submissions should be saved in a single MS Word document, using double-spaced 12-point Times New Roman font, with numbered pages, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The title of the work and your name should appear on the submission. The sample you submit will be the work discussed in class, and accepted registrants will be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

Each registrant should be ready to handle the intensive instruction and atmosphere of the Master Class.

The Art and Craft of Polishing a Poem (AKA Re-Vision): Poetry Master Class with Maureen Ryan Griffin**Closed**
What is revision, after all, but bringing a sparkling fresh vision to a piece of writing and its possibilities, the way you would facet, then polish, a gemstone? I once heard gifted poet Linda Pastan speak at length on revision, which she called “the main act of writing.” She writes her first draft by putting herself in a trance-like state, she said. “And then come 100 revisions. It would be wonderful if there were right and wrong choices.” No one can tell us exactly what to do with our work—writing is an art as well as a craft. But while there aren’t right and wrong choices, we can get crystal-clear on our options in the areas of content, sound, and form and understand why—and how—some serve a particular poem better than others. That’s just what you’ll do in this master class—learn and practice specific revision tactics, as well as get detailed feedback/critique on at least one of your poems. You’ll take home a handy reference chart and descriptions of all the strategies covered—which, by the way, can also help you write more brilliant poetry and prose.

Please submit three poems, along with your current CV in a separate attachment, on the same day that you register for the conference. Poems should be saved in a single MS Word document, using single-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Your name and the title of each poem should appear on the submission. Accepted registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

Each registrant should be ready to handle the intensive instruction and atmosphere of the Master Class.

The Gothic Imagination and Good Writing: Fiction Master Class with Randall Kenan**Closed**
Gothic literature is a cornerstone of the Western literary tradition and had a significant impact in forming the American literary tradition. Attentive writers should be aware of certain building blocks we have inherited from the Gothic: a sense of place/locus, active secrets, acute conflict, among other tropes. In this class we will look at examples and techniques from the Gothic—European, American, Southern, and African-American. And focus on techniques to apply them to our current projects.

Please submit up to 1,500 sequential words from a single work, along with your current CV in a separate attachment, on the same day that you register for the conference. Submissions should be saved in a single MS Word document, using double-spaced 12-point Times New Roman font, with numbered pages, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The title of the work and your name should appear on the submission. The sample you submit will be the work discussed in class, and accepted registrants will be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

Each registrant should be ready to handle the intensive instruction and atmosphere of the Master Class.

 

Return to Top

 


 

Manuscript Mart

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is closed. On-site registration begins at 3:00 pm on Friday, November 2**

 

Manuscript Mart provides writers with the opportunity to submit their manuscripts and get feedback from an editor or agent with a leading publisher or literary agency. A one-on-one, thirty-minute session will be scheduled for you, to take place on Saturday, November 3, sometime between 9:00 am and 5:00 pm, or on Sunday, November 4, between 9:00 am and 12:30 pm.

Please note, a Manuscript Mart session can lead directly to publication—but don’t expect it to do so. Think of it, instead, as a learning opportunity, and you’ll get more out of it.

Manuscript Mart sessions are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. YOUR MANUSCRIPT MART REGISTRATION, WITH MANUSCRIPT AND PAYMENT ENCLOSED, MUST REACH THE NETWORK BY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19.

 

Guidelines

Submit two copies of no more than twenty double-spaced, single-sided, sequential pages of your fiction or nonfiction manuscript, along with two copies of a one-page query or synopsis. Make sure your name is on each page of your manuscript, and number those pages.

All submissions must be double-spaced, in twelve-point Times New Roman font, printed on one side only of 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper, with one-inch margins.

You must be registered for the conference for your Manuscript Mart session to be scheduled.

North Carolina Writers’ Network
Fall Conference Manuscript Mart
PO Box 21591
Winston-Salem, NC 27120

Checklist:

  • two copies of manuscript and query letter or synopsis
  • Manuscript Mart cover sheet;
  • Check to cover Manuscript Mart ($160);
  • A separate check to cover all other conference fees, if you are registering for the conference through the mail.

 

NOTE: If Manuscript Mart fills, your check will be returned to you.

 

Manuscript Mart Reviewers

From the names below, select your first, second, and third choice on your registration form. We will try to accommodate your first choice; if we cannot, we will select an appropriate editor or agent for you. The name of your assigned agent or editor, as well as the time and location of your session, will be included in the packet you will receive at the conference registration table.

Kaitlyn Johnson, Corvisiero Literary Agency**Closed**
Nikki Terpilowski, Holloway Literary**Closed**
Betsy Thorpe, Betsy Thorpe Literary**Closed**
Joanna Volpe, New Leaf Literary & Media**Closed**
Lynn York, Blair**Closed**

 

Return to Top

 


 

Critique Service

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is closed. On-site registration begins at 3:00 pm on Friday, November 2**

 

The Critique Service provides writers with in-depth literary critique of fiction, nonfiction, play/screenplay, or poetry, by a seasoned writer or editor. A one-on-one, thirty-minute review session will be scheduled for you, to take place on Saturday, November 3, sometime between 9:00 am and 5:00 pm, or on Sunday, November 4, between 9:00 am and 12:30 pm.

Critiques are scheduled on a first-come, first-served basis. YOUR CRITIQUE SERVICE REGISTRATION, WITH MANUSCRIPT AND PAYMENT ENCLOSED, MUST REACH THE NETWORK BY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19.

 

Guidelines

Submit two copies of no more than twenty double-spaced, single-sided, sequential pages of your fiction or nonfiction manuscript or play/screenplay (for book-length or full-length projects, you must include a one-page synopsis of the work as a whole, in addition to the twenty pages), or ten pages of poetry. Make sure your name is on each page of your submission. NUMBER YOUR PAGES.

Prose submissions must be double-spaced, in twelve-point Times New Roman font, printed on one side only of 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper, with one-inch margins.

Poetry submissions must be single-spaced, in twelve-point Times New Roman font, printed on one side only of 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper, with one-inch margins, and should include no more than one poem per page.

Play/screenplay submissions must be in proper format, in twelve-point Times New Roman font, printed on one side only of 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper, with one-inch margins.

Download and print the Critique Service cover sheet, which you may also download from the online Registration Form at www.ncwriters.org. Mail it with two hard copies of your submission to:

North Carolina Writers’ Network
Fall Conference Critique Service
PO Box 21591
Winston-Salem, NC 27120

Checklist:

  • Two copies of manuscript (and synopsis, if appropriate);
  • Critique Service cover sheet;
  • Check to cover Critique Service ($150);
  • A separate check to cover all other conference fees if you are registering for the conference through the mail.

 

NOTE: If Critique Service fills, your check will be returned to you.

 

Critiquers

From the names below, select your first, second, and third choice. We will try to accommodate your first choice; if we cannot, we will select an appropriate critiquer for you. The name of your assigned critiquer, as well as the time and location of your session, will be included in the packet you will receive at the conference registration table.

John Amen ,Poetry**Closed**
Margaret Bauer , Fiction, Nonfiction**Closed**
Eric Glawe , Plays, Screenplays**Closed**
John G. Hartness , Genre Fiction**Closed**
Amy Rogers , Fiction, Nonfiction**Closed**

 

Return to Top

 


 

 

Faculty Biographies

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is closed. On-site registration begins at 3:00 pm on Friday, November 2**

 

 

John Amen is the author of several collections of poetry including strange theater (New York Quarterly Books, 2015), a finalist for the 2016 Brockman-Campbell Award. He is co-author, with Daniel Y. Harris, of The New Arcana. His latest collection, Illusion of an Overwhelm, work from which was chosen as a finalist for the Dana Award, was released by New York Quarterly Books in 2017. His poetry, fiction, reviews, and essays have appeared in journals nationally and internationally, and his poetry has been translated into Spanish, French, Hungarian, Korean, and Hebrew. He is a Staff Reviewer for No Depression. He founded and continues to edit The Pedestal Magazine.

Margaret Bauer is the Ralph Hardee Rives Chair of Southern Literature and Distinguished Professor of Harriot College of Arts and Sciences at East Carolina University, where she has served as Editor of the North Carolina Literary Review for more than twenty years. Under her editorship, NCLR has received four awards from the Council of Editors of Learned Journals. She has also edited two books on North Carolina playwright Paul Green, and one of her articles on Green explores his collaboration with Richard Wright on adapting Native Son for the stage. She is the author of four books of literary criticism, including A Study of Scarletts: Scarlett O’Hara’s Literary Daughters, but has turned to creative writing in recent years. Her awards include the 2017 North Carolina Award for Literature, the R. Hunt Parker Memorial Award for significant contributions to North Carolina literature, and the 2018 John Tyler Caldwell Award for the Humanities.

Michele T. Berger is a professor, writer, creativity expert, and pug-lover. Her main love is writing speculative fiction, though she also is known to write poetry and creative nonfiction, too. Her fiction has appeared in UnCommon Origins: A Collection of Gods, Monsters, Nature and Science by Fighting Monkey Press; You Don’t Say: Stories in the Second Person by Ink Monkey Press; Flying South: A Literary Journal; 100wordstory; Thing Magazine; and The Red Clay Review. Her nonfiction and poetry have appeared in The Chapel Hill News, Glint Literary Journal, Oracle: Fine Arts Review, Trivia: Voices of Feminism, The Feminist Wire, Ms. Magazine, Carolina Woman Magazine, Western North Carolina Woman, A Letter to My Mom (Crown Press), Luminescent Threads: Connections to Octavia Butler (Twelfth Planet Press) and various zines. Her sci-fi novella “Reenu-You” was recently published by Book Smugglers Press.

As a stay-at-home Mom,Kim Boykin started writing, grabbing snippets of time in the car-rider line or on the bleachers at swim practice. After her kids left the nest, she started submitting her work, sold her first novel at age fifty-three, and has been writing like crazy ever since. She is the author of A Peach of a Pair, Echoes of Mercy, Palmetto Moon, and The Wisdom of Hair. Her books are well-reviewed and, according to The Huffington Post, she knows how to tell a story that will charm and fascinate her readers.

Bryn Chancellor is the author of the novel Sycamore (Harper/HarperCollins 2017), which was a Southwest Book of the Year, an Indie Next pick, an Amazon Editors’ Best Book of 2017, and among Bustle’s Best Debuts of 2017. Her story collection When Are You Coming Home? (University of Nebraska Press, 2015) won the Prairie Schooner Book Prize, and her fiction and nonfiction have appeared in numerous publications. A recipient of a 2018 North Carolina Artist Fellowship, her honors include fellowships from the Alabama and Arizona state arts councils and the Poets and Writers Maureen Egen Writers Exchange Award. A graduate of Vanderbilt University’s MFA Program, she is an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

Morri Creech was born in Moncks Corner, SC, in 1970 and was educated at Winthrop University and McNeese State University. He is the author of four collections of poetry, Paper Cathedrals (Kent State University Press, 2001); Field Knowledge (Waywiser, 2006), which received the Anthony Hecht Poetry prize and was nominated for both The Los Angeles Times Book Award and the Poet’s Prize; The Sleep of Reason (Waywiser, March 2013), a finalist for the 2014 Pulitzer Prize; and Blue Rooms (Waywiser, October 2018). A recipient of NEA and Ruth Lilly Fellowships, as well as grants from the North Carolina and Louisiana Arts Councils, he is the Writer-in-Residence at Queens University of Charlotte, where he teaches courses in both the undergraduate creative writing program and in the low-residency MFA program. He lives in Charlotte with his wife and two children.

Sarah Creech is the author of Season of the Dragonflies and The Whole Way Home, both published by William Morrow. Her short fiction and essays have appeared in various publications, including Lit Hub, The Cortland Review, Writer’s Digest, and storySouth. She’s an Assistant Professor of English and Creative Writing at Queens University of Charlotte.

North Carolina nativeTracy Crow is a former Marine Corps officer and assistant professor of journalism and creative writing, and the author/editor of six books, including the newly released novella, Cooper’s Hawk: The Remembering; the award-winning memoir, Eyes Right: Confessions from a Woman Marine; the breakthrough writing text, On Point: A Guide to Writing the Military Story; and the recently released popular history, It’s My Country Too: Women’s Military Stories from the American Revolution to Afghanistan with co-author Jerri Bell. As president and CEO of the military arts nonprofit, MilSpeak Foundation, Tracy organizes and leads writing workshops around the country to support the creative endeavors of military servicemembers, veterans, and their families. She has a BA in creative writing from Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida, and an MFA in creative writing from Queens University of Charlotte.

Georgann Eubanks is the author of the three-volume Literary Trails series commissioned by the NC Arts Council and published by UNC Press. Her latest book is The Month of their Ripening: North Carolina Heritage Foods Through the Year (UNC Press, 2018). Georgann has published poetry, fiction, profiles, reviews, and essays in many magazines and journals, including Southern Cultures, South Writ Large, Our State, and Oxford American. Since 2000, she has been a principal with Donna Campbell in Minnow Media, LLC, an Emmy-winning multimedia company that primarily creates independent documentaries for public television. Eubanks has taught creative writing and the power of story to nonprofit leaders, UNC undergraduates, public school students, and adult writers in many contexts. Eubanks is director of the Table Rock Writers Workshop and a founder of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. She is the current president of the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association and serves on the NCWN board.

Ian Finley holds an MFA in Dramatic Writing from the Tisch School at New York University. He served as Resident Playwright for Burning Coal Theatre Company, a small, professional theatre in Raleigh, from 2004 through 2012. In 2012, he was named the Piedmont Laureate in the field of Playwriting and Screenwriting by the arts councils of central North Carolina. He is the author of The Nature of the Nautilus (winner of the Kennedy Center’s Jean Kennedy Smith Award), And There Was War in Heaven (finalist for the O’Neill National Playwrights Conference), Native, The Greeks, 1960, Jude the Obscure, Suspense, A Perfect Negroni, 11:50, and the Our Histories cycle of site-specific plays for Burning Coal.

Julie Funderburk is author of the poetry collection The Door That Always Opens (LSU Press) and a limited edition chapbook, Thoughts to Fold into Birds (Unicorn Press). She is the recipient of a Fellowship in Literature from the North Carolina Arts Council, a fellowship from the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, and a scholarship from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference. Her work appears in journals such as 32 Poems, Best New Poets, The Cincinnati Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, and Ploughshares. A NCWN Board of Trustees member, she is an Assistant Professor of English and Creative Writing at Queens University in Charlotte, where she directs The Arts at Queens.

Eric Glawe is a recent graduate of the University of California at Los Angeles’ Department of Theater, Film, and Television with his MFA in Screenwriting. During his time at UCLA, Eric was able to learn from great screen and television writers such as Ana Lily Amirpour (A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, The Bad Batch), Jill Goldsmith (NYPD Blue, Ally McBeal, Law and Order and Boston Legal), Charles Holland (JAG, The Quad, Black Lightning), Linda Voorhees (Lion King II: Simba’s Pride), Lew Hunter (Fallen Angel, Otherworld), and recently retired department chair Richard Walter. In addition, Eric was chosen to learn from Francis Ford Coppola, assisting on his project, Distant Vision. He learned from producing great Joe Roth (The Sixth Sense, Maleficent, Alice in Wonderland) and was an Intern at Warner Bros. with Berlanti Productions (Arrow, Flash, Riverdale, Love, Simon). His most recently produced project was an adaptation of Romeo and Juliet titled Romeo and Julio, a short film recently screened at UCLA. Eric’s bio-pic screenplay on the life of Disney artist Mary Blair is currently being submitted to producers. Eric teaches Screenwriting and Film Studies at Winthrop University in Rock Hill, SC.

Judy Goldman’s memoir Together: Memoir of a Marriage and a Medical Mishap, will be published by Nan A. Talese/Doubleday in February 2019. She’s also the author of two novels, two poetry collections, and an earlier memoir. That memoir, Losing My Sister, was a finalist for SIBA’s Memoir of the Year and ForeWord Review’s Memoir of the Year. Her fiction won the Sir Walter Raleigh Award, Mary Ruffin Poole Award for First Fiction, and was a finalist for SIBA’s Novel of the Year. Her poetry won the Gerald Cable Prize and the top three prizes for a poetry book by a North Carolinian. Her work has appeared in The Southern Review, Kenyon Review, Gettysburg Review, Ohio Review, Prairie Schooner, Shenandoah, Crazyhorse, and Real Simple magazine. She received the Hobson Award for Distinguished Achievement in Arts and Letters, the Fortner Writer and Community Award for “outstanding generosity to other writers and the larger community,” and Queens University’s Beverly D. Clark Author Award.

Patrice Gopo’s essays have appeared in a variety of literary journals and other publications, including Gulf Coast, Creative Nonfiction, Full Grown People, and online in The New York Times and The Washington Post. Her writing has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize, and she is the grateful recipient of a North Carolina Arts Council Fellowship in Literature. She is the author of All the Colors We Will See: Reflections on Barriers, Brokenness, and Finding Our Way, an essay collection about race, immigration, and belonging. Please visit www.patricegopo.com to learn more.

Jaki Shelton Green is the current poet laureate of North Carolina. She was inducted into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame in 2014, was the 2009 NC Piedmont Laureate, and in 2003 received the North Carolina Award for Literature for her fine poetry and "inveterate championing of the underdog." Her poetry collections and chapbooks include Feeding the Light, breath of the song, Dead on Arrival, Conjure Blues, and singing a tree into dance. Her poetry has appeared in The Crucible, The African-American Review, Obsidian, Ms., and Essence. She lives in Mebane.

Maureen Ryan Griffin has taught the art and craft of writing for twenty-five years through a wide variety of venues, including Queens University and Central Piedmont Community College in Charlotte, the John Campbell Folk School in the Appalachian Mountains, and Chautauqua Institution in New York. An award-winning poetry and nonfiction writer, Griffin has published in numerous publications, including Calyx, Chelsea, Cincinnati Poetry Review, and The Texas Review. She is the author of Spinning Words into Gold, a Hands-On Guide to the Craft of Writing, a guide through grief entitled How Do I Say Goodbye?, and three poetry books. A poem from her latest collection, Ten Thousand Cicadas Can’t Be Wrong, was featured on The Writers’ Almanac. Recipient of the 2018 Irene Blair Honeycutt Legacy Award honoring a community member who has contributed outstanding service in support of local and regional writers, Maureen offers individual coaching, as well as retreats, workshops, and classes, through her business, WordPlay (www.wordplaynow.com).

John G. Hartnessis a teller of tales, a righter of wrongs, defender of ladies’ virtues, and some people call him Maurice, for he speaks of the pompatus of love. He is also the award-winning author of the urban fantasy series The Black Knight Chronicles, the Bubba the Monster Hunter comedic horror series, the Quincy Harker, Demon Hunter dark fantasy series, and many other projects. He is also a cast member of the role-playing podcast Authors & Dragons, where a group of comedy, fantasy, and horror writers play Pathfinder. Very poorly. In 2016, John teamed up with a pair of other publishing industry ne’er-do-wells and founded Falstaff Books, a small press dedicated to publishing the best of genre fiction’s “misfit toys.” In his copious free time, John enjoys long walks on the beach, rescuing kittens from trees, and playing Magic: the Gathering..

Jodi Helmer has been a full-time freelance writer since 2002, landing bylines in publications such as National Geographic Traveler, NPR, CountryLiving.com, Hemispheres, Smithsonian.com, WebMD, Wired, and many more. She is also the author of seven books, including three titles scheduled for release in 2019. Learn more at www.jodihelmer.com or @helmerjodi.

After receiving a BA in Writing, Literature, and Publishing from Emerson College, Kaitlyn Johnson refused to leave the concept of nightly homework behind. As well as being a junior agent for Corvisiero Literary Agency, she is also a freelance editor at her own company, K. Johnson Editorial, and has worked as a copyeditor for academic publisher codeMantra, a YA editor for Accent Press, and a Conference Assistant for GrubStreet in Boston. She has written various articles for Writer’s Digest and has had a flash fiction story published in the anthology A Box of Stars Beneath the Bed. You can view her submission guidelines and details of what she’s currently accepting at her agency profile. For #mswl listings and writerly life thoughts, feel free to check out her Twitter, @kaitylynne13.

Novelist, playwright, and screenwriter Robert Inman is a native of Elba, Alabama, where he began his writing career in junior high school with his hometown weekly newspaper. He left a thirty-one-year career in television journalism in 1996 to devote his full time to fiction writing. Inman’s latest stage play is Liberty Mountain, a drama about the settling of the Carolinas and the Revolutionary War Battle of Kings Mountain. It is staged every summer at the Joy Performance Center in Kings Mountain. He is the author of two musicals—Crossroads and The Christmas Bus: The Musical—for which he wrote book, lyrics, and music. His other stage plays are The Christmas Bus, Dairy Queen Days, Welcome to Mitford, A High Country Christmas Carol, and The Drama Club. He has written screenplays for six motion pictures for television, two of which have been “Hallmark Hall of Fame” presentations. His script for The Summer of Ben Tyler, a Hallmark production, won the Writers’ Guild of America Award as the best original television screenplay of 1997. His other Hallmark feature was Home Fires Burning, a 1989 adaptation of his novel.

Kathy Izard was an award-winning graphic designer for twenty years in Charlotte before launching the pilot program Homeless to Homes for the interfaith Urban Ministry Center in 2007. She led the city-wide effort to build Moore Place, Charlotte’s first permanent supportive housing for chronically homeless men and women. After Moore Place opened in 2012, Kathy worked on numerous civic projects, most recently leading the development campaign for HopeWay, Charlotte’s first nonprofit residential mental health treatment center that opened in 2016. She wrote about her efforts in the originally self-published memoir The Hundred Story Home, which received the 2017 Christopher Award. In 2017, the book and movie rights to her story were purchased by Thomas Nelson, a division of Harper Collins, and a new edition released June, 2018: www.kathyizard.com.

Randall Kenan is the author of a novel, A Visitation of Spirits; two works of nonfiction, Walking on Water: Black American Lives at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century and The Fire This Time; and a collection of stories, Let the Dead Bury Their Dead. He edited and wrote the introduction for The Cross of Redemption: The Uncollected Writings of James Baldwin. Among his awards are a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Mrs. Giles Whiting Award, the North Carolina Award, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters’ Rome Prize. Kenan is a 2018 inductee into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame. He is a Professor of English and Comparative Literature at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Terry L. Kennedy is the author of New River Breakdown (Unicorn Press, 2013), a collection of prose poems. He currently serves as Director of the Graduate Program in Creative Writing at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro and as editor of the online journal, storySouth. You can find him online at www.terrylkennedy.com.

Cynthia Lewis is Charles A. Dana Professor of English at Davidson College, where she has been teaching Shakespeare, Renaissance literature, and creative nonfiction since 1980. She has published numerous articles and two books on Shakespeare and his contemporaries, the latest just out: “The game’s afoot”: A Sports Lover’s Introduction to Shakespeare. Her creative nonfiction ranges in focus from American culture to personal essays and has been published in such venues as The Hudson Review, New Letters, The Antioch Review, Southern Cultures, The Massachusetts Review, and Charlotte Magazine. Four of her essays have been cited as a “Notable Essay” in the Best American Essays series between 2006 and 2016. Her essay “Return Engagement: The Haunting of Hamlet and Dale Earnhardt, Jr.” won Shenandoah’s Thomas Carter Essay Prize for 2016, and another essay, “Body Doubles,” was awarded the 2017 Meringoff Prize for nonfiction by the Association of Literary Scholars, Critics, and Writers.

Erika Marks is the author of five women’s fiction novels for Penguin’s NAL imprint: Little Gale Gumbo, The Mermaid Collector, The Guest House, It Comes in Waves, and The Last Treasure—as well as several romance novellas for Tule Publishing. Having written and submitted over a dozen manuscripts before receiving her first contract, she knows that the road to publication can be both challenging and deeply rewarding. She has led workshops for writers on all aspects of the publication process, as well presented on topics of craft. Originally from New England, she spent nearly the last decade in beautiful North Carolina and has recently moved to Maryland.

Gail Z. Martin writes epic fantasy, urban fantasy, and steampunk for Solaris Books, Orbit Books, and Falstaff Books. Series include Darkhurst, the Chronicles of The Necromancer, the Fallen Kings Cycle, the Ascendant Kingdoms Saga, the Assassins of Landria, and Deadly Curiosities. Newest titles include Vengeance, Tangled Web, and Assassin’s Honor. Gail has also written five nonfiction books on social media and marketing and life change. 30 Days to Social Media Success was named by Life Hack to be one of the Top 20 Business Books to Read in 2016. Her newest books are The Essential Social Media Marketing Handbook and Fresh Start Success (co-written with Larry N. Martin).

Paula Martinac is a fiction writer, playwright, and screenwriter. Her recent novel, The Ada Decades, was a finalist for the 2018 Ferro-Grumley Award for LGBT Fiction, and her fiction debut, Out of Time, won a Lambda Literary Award. A fifth novel, Clio Rising, will be published by Bywater Books in May, 2019. Her short stories have appeared in Raleigh Review, Main Street Rag, and elsewhere, and her plays have been produced at festivals in Pittsburgh, New York, and Washington, DC. Her full-length screenplay, Foreign Affairs, placed second in the 2003 POWER UP Screenplay Award. She teaches creative writing to undergraduates at UNC Charlotte and is a writing coach with Charlotte Center for the Literary Arts.

Dannye Romine Powell is the author of four poetry collections, the most recent from Press 53, Nobody Calls Me Darling Anymore. She has twice won the Brockman Campbell Award, as well as the Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition award in 2011. She has won fellowships in poetry from the NEA, the NC Arts Council, and Yaddo. She has served as book editor and local news columnist of the Charlotte Observer and is the author of Parting the Curtains: Interviews with Southern Writers.

Paul Reali is a co-founder of Charlotte Center for Literary Arts, Inc. (Charlotte Lit), a nonprofit dedicated to elevating the literary arts in the Charlotte area. He is the co-author of Creativity Rising, a why-to and how-to guide to finding creative solutions, with more than 10,000 copies in print; and is the co-editor of three volumes in the Big Questions in Creativity series from ICSC Press. His articles and essays have been published in more than a dozen publications, including the Winston-Salem Journal, InSpine Magazine, Lawyers Weekly, NC Entrepreneur, and Office Solutions. Among other honors, Paul was awarded First Place in the Ruth Moose Flash Fiction Contest and the Elizabeth Simpson Smith Short Fiction Contest. Paul has an MS in Creativity from SUNY Buffalo State. He can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Susan Rivers’ debut novel, The Second Mrs. Hockaday, was a finalist for the Center for Fiction First Novel Award 2017 and was one of four finalists for the SIBA Southern Book Prize 2018 for Southern Fiction. Rivers began her writing career in West Coast theater, where she studied with Sam Shepherd, and where her plays were produced at the Eureka Theater in San Francisco, at Seattle Repertory Theatre, and in Los Angeles at the Mark Taper Forum. She is a veteran of the Playwrights Festival at Sundance Institute for the Arts and the Eugene O’Neill Playwrights Conference, where she worked with Sarah Jessica Parker and studied with August Wilson and Lloyd Richards. Rivers was awarded the Julie Harris Playwriting Award for Overnight Lows and a New York Drama League Award for Under Statements. She lives and writes in upstate South Carolina.

Amy Rogers is a writer and reporter for NPR station WFAE in Charlotte, where she is contributing editor for the online food magazine WFAEats: All Things Food and Culture. Her work has been featured on Foodnetwork.com, in Cornbread Nation 1: The Best of Southern Food Writing, and many other publications. She has authored and edited multiple books, including Hungry for Home: Stories of Food from Across the Carolinas. She was a founder and publisher of Novello Press, the groundbreaking literary publishing project that put into print more than 300 writers, many for the first time, along with luminaries such as Pat Conroy, Ron Rash, and Dori Sanders. As an editor, writing coach, and workshop presenter, Rogers has worked with hundreds of people to hone their skills and find satisfaction in their writing.

After receiving a BA in English, Nikki Terpilowski worked in the marketing communications field for several years as a writer and editor for civilian and government clients. Deciding she wanted to align her professional career with her lifelong passion for reading and writing, she interned at the Elaine English Agency based in Washington, DC, and then moved into literary management, representing a small group of women’s fiction and romance writers that has expanded to include a list of YA, literary, historical, Southern, mystery, and thriller authors. Based in Raleigh and established in 2011, Holloway Literary is a full-service agency that represents writers in romance, women’s and Southern fiction, mystery, thriller, historical, literary, science fiction, and select young adult. Nikki loves all types of fiction but is particularly interested in finding fresh Southern voices and stories that highlight the beauty and quirkiness of the Southeastern United States.

Betsy Thorpe has been in the book publishing business since graduating from college. She has worked as an editor at Atheneum Publishers (Simon & Schuster), HarperCollins, Broadway Books (Random House), and John Wiley & Sons. She opened up her own literary services company in 2000, where she has guided many authors to publication, and ghost-written many books, some of which have appeared on Oprah, People magazine, and The New York Times. Betsy lives in Charlotte with her two teenage daughters and rescue dog, Charlie.

Joanna Volpe is a literary agent and the president of New Leaf Literary & Media, where she represents a broad reach of fiction and nonfiction. Joanna works with incredible talent such as Leigh Bardugo (Six of Crows, Henry Holt), Melissa Dahl (Cringeworthy: A Theory of Awkwardness, Portfolio), Veronica Roth (Divergent, Katherine Tegen Books), and Jeff Jackson (Destroy All Monsters: The Last Rock Novel, FSG). In her fiction, she is seeking unique and diverse perspectives, and enjoys morbid, strange, and offbeat topics. Her tastes in adult nonfiction range from foodie books and travel books to general pop-culture and pop-science, on to narrative nonfiction featuring captivating and powerful women.

Kim Wright is the author of Love in Mid Air (Grand Central), The Unexpected Waltz, The Canterbury Sisters, and Last Ride to Graceland (Gallery Books), which is the 2017 recipient of the Willie Morris Award for Southern Fiction. Her six-volume historical mystery series, City of Mystery, follows the adventures of the first forensics unit in Scotland Yard. Kim also teaches, and as The Story Doctor she offers both Charlotte-based workshops and one-on-one coaching to novelists, specializing in the areas of story arc, pacing, and narrative structure.

Lynn York is the Publisher of Blair. In January, 2018, the nonprofit Carolina Wren Press acquired the titles of John F. Blair, Publisher. The resulting press, based in Durham, is named Blair. The mission of Blair is to seek out, nurture, and promote literary works by new and underrepresented writers. York, a graduate of Duke University, is the author of two novels, The Piano Teacher and The Sweet Life.

Lisa Zerkle’s poems and reviews have appeared in The Collagist, Comstock Review, Southern Poetry Anthology, Broad River Review, Tar River Poetry, Nimrod, storySouth, poemmemoirstory, Cider Press Review, and Main Street Rag, among others. Her poem “Relics of the Great Acceleration” won the North Carolina Writers’ Network 2017 Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition. She is the author of Heart of the Light and a former editor of Kakalak. She lives in Charlotte, where she is the curator of 4X4CLT, a public art and poetry poster series, for the Charlotte Center for Literary Arts.

 

 

Return to Top

 


 

Support for the 2018 Fall Conference is provided by the North Carolina Arts Council, the North Carolina Humanities Council, The Arts & Science Council, The English Department at Davidson College, Freedom.toAl Manning, Odin Law & MediaAlice Osborn: Editor/Book Coach/Author, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte Department of English, and the William M. Hendricks Family Foundation.

 

                                                                   

 

  

   

  


 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Joomla Templates: by JoomlaShack