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DURHAM—Former Piedmont Laureate Mimi Herman will lead the poetry session "Poetry Nap: Relax Your Way to Great" at the North Carolina Writers' Network 2021 Fall Conference, November 19-21, at the Sheraton Imperial Hotel in Durham/RTP.

Conference registration is open.

Mimi Herman  is a writer and editor, Kennedy Center teaching artist, and co-director of Writeaways writing workshops in France, Italy, New Mexico, and online. Since 1990, she has engaged over 25,000 students with writing workshops. She is a Warren Wilson alumna and the 2017 North Carolina Piedmont Laureate, and serves as a member of the AWP Board of Directors. Mimi has held readings at Why There are Words, Symphony Space, and—with David Sedaris—at Memorial Auditorium in North Carolina. Her writing has appeared in Michigan Quarterly Review, Shenandoah, Crab Orchard Review, The Hollins Critic, Prime Number, and other journals. She is the author of Logophilia and The Art of Learning. Her latest collection of poetry, A Field Guide to Human Emotions, is available from Finishing Line Press, and her novel, The Kudzu Queen, will be released from Regal House Publishing in 2023. You can find Mimi at www.mimiherman.com and www.writeaways.com.

This year, NCWN is asking authors for "one good piece of advice," either something they were once told that they never forgot, or something they wished they could go back and tell their younger selves. 

"The one piece of advice I'd give new writers is this," Mimi says. "Write 15 minutes every day. It doesn't have to be good. It doesn't have to be smart. It doesn't have to connect with what you wrote yesterday or what you'll write tomorrow. Just fifteen minutes every day (though you can certainly write more if you're inspired). If you miss a day, don't punish yourself by forcing yourself to write 30 minutes (or 45 if you miss three, 60 if you miss four, etc.). Just start again with your fifteen minutes.

"I wrote a novel that way.

"By the way, this also works for experienced writers who are trying to find their way back into their writing lives."

If your life feels like one commitment piled on top of another, with no time for writing, to ease your way into inspiration. In "Poetry Nap: Relax Your Way to Great," you’ll slowly relax, breathe deeply as we rarely get the opportunity to do, and take a journey into the deepest part of yourself. When you emerge from your poetry nap, you’ll be ready to spill ideas and images onto the page, and craft them into poetry. This workshop is designed for writers of all levels.

Fall Conference attracts hundreds of writers from around the country and provides a weekend full of activities that include lunch and dinner banquets with readings, keynotes, tracks in several genres, open mic sessions, and the opportunity for one-on-one manuscript critiques with editors or agents. North Carolina Poet Laureate Jaki Shelton Green will give the Keynote Address. Additional poetry sessions will be led by Dasan Ahanu, Fred Joiner, Han VanderHart, and more.

Register here.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to all writers, in all genres, at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

DURHAM—Mesha Maren, author of Sugar Run (Algonquin Books, 2019) and an assistant professor at Duke University, will lead the Fiction Master Class "Get Out Your Jungle Red Fingernails, or How to Write Your Way Off the Plateau of Mediocrity" at the North Carolina Writers' Network 2021 Fall Conference, November 19-21, at the Sheraton Imperial Hotel in Durham/RTP.

Conference registration is open.

Mesha Maren is the author of Sugar Run (Algonquin Books, 2019) and Perpetual West (2022). Her work has appeared in the Oxford American, the Guardian, Tin House, the Southern Review, and elsewhere. She was the recipient of the Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize, an Elizabeth George Foundation grant, and fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and the Ucross Foundation. She is an assistant professor at Duke University and also serves as a NEA Writing Fellow at the federal prison camp in Alderson, West Virginia.

This year, NCWN is asking authors for "one good piece of advice," either something they were once told that they never forgot, or something they wished they could go back and tell their younger selves. Mesha says:

"My piece of advice is keep going until you reach the end for the first time! In the words of my former teacher and mentor Lauren Groff, "ride the wave." When I was working on my first novel as a graduate student I kept doubting myself and stopping, turning around in the manuscript to look back and critique myself. Lauren Groff told me to move forward at all costs and it was a great advice. It is important, especially when writing a novel, to build moment and get an idea of the scope of the entire project before doing line edits. Ride the wave to the end and then turn around and start editing!"

In "Get Out Your Jungle Red Fingernails, or How to Write Your Way Off the Plateau of Mediocrity" we will explore constraint-based writing techniques that will help us to surprise our own selves with our writing, avenues towards that white-hot flame of risk that resides at the center of all great writing. We will look at prompts and constraints that writers such as Amy Hempel, Mary Robison, Gordon Lish, and Robert Stone have used to enliven their writing as well as a few original constraints that Mesha herself has developed, and we will talk about methods to help ourselves shake it up and use our hard-earned writing skills in brand new ways.

Writers who have participated in workshops for any extended length of time come to know, in an almost subliminal way, what other workshop participants are going to say about our work. We know the basics, of course, and could chant in our sleep: show don’t tell, use active language, Freytag’s triangle, sentences must work on more than one level! We also come to know the specifics of our teachers and peers: Professor X will question my use of poetic language or Professor Y will tell me I’m not starting the story in the right place. And we begin to realize what will be praised for. Professor Z loved my descriptions of pine trees, we think, so I’ll put some beautiful pine trees in my next story and hope that Professor A praises me too. And in this way we can, if we are not careful, become very comfortable with crafting our precious little pieces. We coast along the plateau of mediocrity, painstakingly writing our short stories just like Professor X taught us to. We are following Freytag’s model (or very carefully not following it), we are emulating the masters, we are following the advice of Professors X, Y and Z and we are hoping fervently that our piece will be praised at the workshop table. But are we writing the most blindingly brilliant and shatteringly original literature that we could possibly imagine? No, probably not. We are afraid of falling because we know how falling feels and finally now we are kind of not falling down all the time, but that is exactly when we must learn to get our own jungle red fingernails, stop being afraid and push ourselves to write wilder and deeper.

For more about Master Classes, and to apply, click here.

Fall Conference attracts hundreds of writers from around the country and provides a weekend full of activities that include lunch and dinner banquets with readings, keynotes, tracks in several genres, open mic sessions, and the opportunity for one-on-one manuscript critiques with editors or agents. North Carolina Poet Laureate Jaki Shelton Green will give the Keynote Address. Additional Master Classes will be led by Tyree Daye (Poetry) and Marianne Gingher (Creative Nonfiction).

Register here.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to all writers, in all genres, at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

FLETCHER, NC—Writers today have more ways to share their work with the world than at any other point in history. Digital platforms have, by and large, obliterated the need for gatekeepers, allowing creators to connect directly with their fans.

From podcasting to writing and producing short films, ever-evolving technologies offer writers exciting and innovative—some might say "newfangled"—ways of reaching new audiences.

On Tuesday, October 19, at 7:00 pm EST, writer, editor, and teacher Katie Winkler will lead the online class "The Big Share: Alternative Forms of Publication in a Digital Age."

Registration is closed.

For more than 30 years, Katie Winkler has been writing for publication and production. Through technology, she has found new avenues to share her work with people all over the world. In "The Big Share," she'll discuss some of the non-traditional publishing avenues that offer writers a creative outlet as well as incentive to keep improving their writing and a reason to produce their art—without costing much. This conversation will cover podcasting; editing a literary journal; writing and producing for stage and screen; blogging; and more.

The cost for the class is $35 for NCWN members, $45 for non-members. Space is limited.

Katie Winkler lives in the beautiful mountains of Western North Carolina. She is a writer, teacher, wife and mother in love with all her jobs. A trustee of the North Carolina Writers' Network, Katie is the founder and publisher of the literary magazine Teach.Write, which features creative works by composition teachers and writing students or work that is about teaching and learning. She is an English instructor at Blue Ridge Community College: www.heymrswinkler.com.

"The Big Share" is the first class in the North Carolina Writers' Network's 2021-2022 series of online classes.

"The Network offered online classes long before the COVID-19 pandemic, and we'll continue to do so moving forward," said NCWN communications director Charles Fiore. "While nothing can replace the energy of an in-person event, online classes can still be inspirational. More importantly, they offer a way to connect with writers across the state and beyond while staying safe."

The online class "The Big Share" is available to anyone with an internet connection, or who even owns just a telephone. Instructions for accessing the online class on Tuesday, October 19, will be sent to registrants no less than 24 hours prior to the start of class. The class will be archived and made available to registrants for repeated viewings.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

 
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