White Cross School Blog

 

NC Literary Hall of Fame

 

 

Advertisement

ASHEVILLE—At the North Carolina Writers' Network 2019 Fall Conference, Anne Fitten Glenn will lead the session "Creative Ways to Promote Your Book (and Yourself)."

Fall Conference runs November 8-10 at the Doubletree by Hilton Asheville-Biltmore. Registration is now open.

Award-winning author and journalist Anne Fitten Glenn has been writing about and working in the beer business since the 1990s. She is the author of two books,Western North Carolina: A Mountain Brew History (2018) and Asheville Beer: An Intoxicating History of Mountain Brewing (2012), both published by Arcadia/The History Press. She was the national public relations director and east coast marketing manager for Oskar Blues Brewery for three years. Currently, she consults to breweries across the country in the arenas of communications and public relations as well as writing for both beverage trade and consumer magazines. She pens a regular “Mountain Brews” article for Edible Asheville and has written for numerous other publications, including All About Beer, Smoky Mountain Living, Edible Aspen, WNC Magazine, Asheville Citizen-Times,  and www.CraftBeer.com. She's lived in and written about the Asheville area since 1997.

This year, NCWN has been celebrating libraries, so we asked Anne to give us her best library memory.

Here's what she wrote:

“You must have a two documents verifying your permanent address,” said the librarian in her posh British accent. She looked at me through reading glasses that barely hung on the tip of her nose.

I wondered if I’d stepped into a Monty Python skit. But no, I was in the foyer of The British Library. And the woman who epitomized the forbidding librarian stereotype in my head was not an actor.

I felt, not for the first time, that being an American in London was a disadvantage. As a Southerner, I know folks who are bitter about a war that took place decades before they were born. In the UK, I’d engage with those still angry over one that ended centuries ago.

“If you want me to act the part of a brash revolutionary, disdainful of king and country, I will do so, ma’am.” I didn’t say that out loud, of course.

I’d moved to the U.K. on a whim after graduate school. After twenty-six years in the state of Georgia, I was desperate to live somewhere different for a spell. That's when I learned I could get a six-month post-graduate visa to work abroad.

I knew no one in London. I didn’t have a job lined up. But I kind of could speak the language.

I figured I could sling beer or work in a bookstore. Turned out my sister’s roommate’s uncle offered me the pull-out couch in his living room in exchange for house-sitting while he traveled. He worked in television and introduced me to a friend who was starting a small documentary production company. I had journalism and English degrees, some newspaper writing experience, an American passport, and most importantly, a bit of computer knowledge (who else remembers MS-DOS?). Thus began an adventure that would last more than two years.

The offices I worked in were located a few blocks from King’s Cross/St. Pancreas Station. My job was a typical entry-level position in the field. I spent workdays either bored out of my mind or chasing around a stressed-out director on deadline. On the dull days, I’d take a long lunch and wander around the city.

Like most writers, I have multitudinous happy library memories from my childhood and university days. When I discovered that the largest national library in the world was next to my Tube station, I was thrilled. Until that librarian stonewalled me.

“I do have a U.K. address,” I said. “But it’s not in my name. I’m house sitting. I have a passport, of course.”

She didn’t look impressed.

“Two forms of identifications with matching permanent addresses are required,” she said. “And you need to submit a form with your research project.”

“I can’t just read books that I want to read? What kind of library is this?” Again, feeling intimidated, I didn’t say this aloud.

The librarian had refocused on her desk—a not-so-subtle dismissal.

“Wait,” I said. “I work for a television production company, and we’re making a series of documentaries for the BBC, and I need to do research.”

This was a stretch as most of our research was done online through paid archives. However, I’d already learned that dropping “the BBC” into conversations increased my status.

“Bring me a note from your director. On company letterhead. And your passport. And an envelope addressed to you where you are living now.”

I waited a few days before taking my case to one of my bosses. I choose the more literary of the two—the man who was working on a screen adaptation of Hamlet. Even so, he was confounded. “You want to spend your lunch hour in The British Library?”

“That’s exactly what I want to do,” I replied.

And that's what I did, at least once a week for most of the next two years. I browsed the stacks, sat quietly in one of the reading rooms, and, despite the library’s research directive, read whatever I wanted to read.

Long gone are the days of publisher-organized book tours, press junkets, and author travel per diems. In "Creative Ways to Promote Your Book (and Yourself)," we’ll talk about the tried and true ways to promote your book and yourself as an author as well as exploring creative options that cost next to nothing. We’ll cover how to best use various social media outlets, how to engage regional and national media, how to solicit reviews and testimonials, and how to launch your book and organize a tour. We’ll discuss the least time-consuming things you can do to promote your book without losing your mind! While this class will focus on book promotions, if you haven’t written a book yet, it will help you learn how to find a wider audience for your writing. 

Fall Conference attracts hundreds of writers from around the country and provides a weekend full of activities that include lunch and dinner banquets with readings, keynotes, tracks in several genres, open mic sessions, and the opportunity for one-on-one manuscript critiques with editors or agents. Master Classes will be led by Abigail DeWitt (Fiction), Jeremy B. Jones (Nonfiction), and Nickole Brown and Jessica Jacobs (Poetry).

Register here.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to all writers, in all genres, at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

ASHEVILLE—At the North Carolina Writers' Network 2019 Fall ConferenceJeremy B. Jones will lead the Master Class in Nonfiction "Exploding Your Drafts."

Fall Conference runs November 8-10 at the Doubletree by Hilton Asheville-Biltmore. Registration is now open.

Jeremy B. Jones is the author of Bearwallow: A Personal History of a Mountain Homeland, which was awarded Gold in "Memoir" in the 2015 Independent Publisher Book of the Year awards and named the 2014 Appalachian Book of the Year in Nonfiction. His essays appear in Oxford American, Brevity, The Iowa Review, and frequently in Our State magazine. Jeremy is an associate professor of English at Western Carolina University and the co-editor of In Place, a literary nonfiction book series from Vandalia Press.

This year, NCWN has been celebrating libraries, so we asked Jeremy to give us his best library memory.

Here's what he wrote:

"When I was a boy, my grandmother volunteered at the library down the road. She had worked in the high school library until she retired, and then she became the minder for my cousins and me in the summers. We were wild animals, and she kept us fed and safe whenever we stepped indoors briefly. When we started back to school, she drove down Chimney Rock Road to the tiny Edneyville branch library (a singlewide trailer above a creek) to shelve books and file cards. Later, we sometimes went with her, especially once the card catalog became a computer and she needed our help. I remember reading books in her house, pulling novels off shelves in that library, but as a boy, I only wanted to be outside. Books seemed too small, too slow. So I blurred past everything.

"A year after my book Bearwallow came out, a memoir that is dedicated to my grandparents, I had the chance to read from my book at an event in that small library above the creek. Before the reading started, I walked the stacks (three rows of them) and couldn’t shake the impossibility of it all: finding my own book on those shelves I’d rushed through as a boy, where Grandma straightened all spines. In truth, I’d only written my book because I finally learned to ask my grandparents to tell me stories. I’d learned to sit still (sometimes) and listen to them talk to me about their lives, about the far-off world that is the past. I’d started sorting out who I was, who I might become, by listening to all the tales of the people who’d come before me.

"My grandmother has passed on now, and when I take my sons to the library every week for the next Boxcar Children mystery or Pete the Cat, I imagine everything that those rows of books might mean for them. For who they might become. And whether they know it or not, I know this: wherever they go, my grandma and that singlewide library are taking them there."

No matter the form—memoir, personal essay, lyric, biography—a draft often benefits from an explosion: making the material more ambitious, rangier, and, sometimes, messier. Jeremy's Master Class will explore the seams of your material to see where we might place a charge and blow things open. What’s the story under the story? Could a counter thread create unexpected meaning? Where could we dig deeper into memories to discover bigger questions? We will read excerpts of complex, ambitious nonfiction and try numerous exercises to build our writerly muscles. Then we’ll put those muscles to work, as we workshop our drafts and consider where they might go next, how they might blow wide open.

Fall Conference attracts hundreds of writers from around the country and provides a weekend full of activities that include lunch and dinner banquets with readings, keynotes, tracks in several genres, open mic sessions, and the opportunity for one-on-one manuscript critiques with editors or agents. Additional Master Classes will be led by Abigail DeWitt (Fiction) and Nickole Brown and Jessica Jacobs (Poetry). Ron Rash will give the Keynote Address.

Register here.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to all writers, in all genres, at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

ASHEVILLE—Most visitors to Asheville are already aware that Asheville is a foodie haven and a beer drinker's paradise, boasting more breweries per capita than any other city in the country. They also are likely aware of Asheville's countless outdoor opportunities, from hiking to rafting to rock climbing and more.

What they may not know is that Asheville is a music lover's paradise as well, recently named one of the top 10 music destinations in the country by National Geographic Traveler.

The North Carolina Writers' Network 2019 Fall Conference runs November 8-10 at the DoubleTree by Hilton Asheville-Biltmore. Registration is open.

Saturday night's annual banquet will feature the Asheville-based Pan Harmonia, which has been offering world-class chamber music for twenty years. At Fall Conference, Pan Harmonia will present the premiere of a music and poetry fusion work, "Rubble Becomes Art," a triptych of songs composed by Dosia McKay inspired by poetry by North Carolina writers Sally Atkins, Valerie Foote, and Cathy Larson Sky. 

Pan Harmonia travels widely, bringing different arrangements and musicians depending on the venue and program. They partner with a wide-array of community groups and aim to bring music to people of all ages. In 2008, they became the first chamber music group invited to tour with the North Carolina Arts Council’s cARTwheels program. Pan Harmonia created "Fandango, Tango, Huapango," which brought the vibrancy of Latin music, art, and dance to more than 10,000 children across North Carolina.

Click here to view Pan Harmonia's YouTube channel, where you can watch scores of performances.

For anyone with a family, it can be a challenge to attend a weekend conference, especially if that weekend conference is out of town. But with a locale like Asheville, there is fun to be had for the entire family. A November weekend in the mountains, which should allow visitors to catch the tailend of the stunning autumn foilage, should be an easy sell for family members young and old.

NCWN's Fall Conference venue is only steps from terrific shopping at Biltmore Village and the iconic Biltmore Estate.

Pre-registration for the NCWN 2019 Fall Conference ends November 1.

Register here.

For more ideas on what to do in and around the Asheville area, visit www.exploreasheville.com

Sponsors of the North Carolina Writers’ Network 2019 Fall Conference include the Blue Ridge Level Sponsor, UNC Asheville's Great Smokies Writing Program, as well as Asheville FM 103.3; the Flatiron Writers Room; the North Carolina Arts Council; the North Carolina Humanities Council; Alice Osborn: Author/Book Coach/Editor; Smoky Mountain LivingThe Thomas Wolfe MFA Program in Creative Writing at Lenoir-Rhyne University Asheville; Katie Winkler and Teach.Write.; and WNCW 88.7.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to all writers, in all genres, at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

 
Joomla Template: from JoomlaShack