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GREENVILLE—The 2018 Doris Betts Fiction Prize is now open for submissions.

The competition is for previously unpublished short stories up to 6,000 words and is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. North Carolina Literary Review subscribers with North Carolina connections (lives or has lived in NC) are also eligible. The winner receives $250 and publication in North Carolina Literary Review. The postmark deadline is February 15.

To submit, click here.

This year's final judge is Stephanie Powell Watts, winner of the Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence for her debut story collection, We Are Taking Only What We Need (Ecco Press, 2012), also named one of 2013’s Best Summer Reads by O: The Oprah Magazine. Her debut novel, No One Is Coming to Save Us (Ecco Press, 2017), follows the return of a successful native son to his home in North Carolina and his attempt to join the only family he ever wanted but never had. Her short fiction has been included in two volumes of the Best New Stories from the South anthology and honored with a Pushcart Prize. Born in the foothills of North Carolina, with a Ph.D from the University of Missouri and a BA from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, she now lives with her husband and son in Pennsylvania where she is an associate professor at Lehigh University.

For over twenty years, East Carolina University and the North Carolina Literary & Historical Association have published the North Carolina Literary Review, a journal devoted to showcasing the Tar Heel State’s literary excellence. Described by one critic as “everything you ever wanted out of a literary publication but never dared to demand,” NCLR has won numerous awards and citations.

Doris Betts was the author of three short story collections and six novels. She won three Sir Walter Raleigh awards, the Southern Book Award, the North Carolina Award for Literature, the John Dos Passos Prize, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters Medal for the short story, among others. Beloved by her students, she was named the University of North Carolina Alumni Distinguished Professor of English in 1980. She was a 2004 inductee of the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame.

Robert Wallace of Durham won the 2017 Doris Betts Fiction Prize for his story "The Science of Air," where "guilt, sadness, and wisdom conspire to make a gracefully introspective work of fiction." This was the second Doris Betts Fiction Prize for Robert Wallace.

Here are the complete guidelines:

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. North Carolina Literary Review subscribers with North Carolina connections (lives or has lived in NC) are also eligible.
  • The competition is for previously unpublished short stories up to 6,000 words. Multiple entries ok, but each requires a separate entry fee. No novel excerpts. Stories do NOT have to relate to NCLR’s annual special feature topic.
  • The deadline is February 15.
  • Simultaneous submissions ok, but please notify us immediately if your work is accepted elsewhere.
  • Submit previously unpublished stories online at https://nclr.submittable.com/submit. Submittable will collect your entry fee via credit card ($10 NCWN members or NCLR subscribers / $20 for non-members/non-subscribers).
  • To pay submission fees by check or money order, make payable to the North Carolina Writers Network and mail to: Ed Southern, PO Box 21591, Winston-Salem, NC 27120- 1591
  • Documents must be Microsoft Word or .rtf files. Stories should be double-spaced. Author's name should not appear on manuscripts. (Submittable will collect and record your name and contact information.) If you have any problems submitting electronically, email NCLR's This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
  • If submitting by mail, mail story manuscript with a cover sheet providing name, address, email address, word count, and manuscript title, to:

NCLR
ECU Mailstop
555 English
Greenville, NC 27858-4353
(but mail payment to the Network as per instructions above)

The winner and finalists will be announced by May 1. The winning story and select finalists will be published in the next year’s issue of the North Carolina Literary Review.

Questions may be directed to Margaret Bauer, Editor of the North Carolina Literary Review, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

The Promise Between Us by Barbara Claypole White

Lake Union Publishing
$14.95, paperback / $3.99, e-book
ISBN: 978-1-542048989
January, 2018
Fiction: Women's Fiction
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

“Barbara Claypole White does not merely write about people with mental illness—she inhabits them; she IS Katelyn, the young mother overcome with images of killing her new baby, the mother who leaves her baby to keep her safe…Later White IS that same child, Maisie, now beginning to struggle with OCD herself—and all Maisie’s worries, all her thoughts and the details of her pre-teen life are precisely, exactly right. Perfect. White knows how to tell a story, too, how to fully create each additional realistic and fascinating character, and also how to increase suspense as the family drama unfolds. This brilliant novel about obsessive compulsive disorder is compulsively readable.”
—NC Literary Hall of Fame inductee Lee Smith, New York Times bestselling author of The Last Girls

"This is an eye-opening and realistic exploration of mental illness—a topic that greatly deserves to be front and center."
—Jodi Picoult, New York Times bestselling author of Small Great Things

“In The Promise Between Us, Barbara Claypole White masters the art of bringing a reader up close and personal to the influences and forces of a mental illness. In this powerhouse of a story, Katelyn MacDonald’s decision to give up the precious gift of raising her baby, Maisie, in order to protect her, makes for a compelling page-turner. This is an in-depth portrayal of what it means to live in a world where every single thought or action comes into question; it is a story for the times, a story filled with stark realities; but most important of all, it is a story about hope, healing, and the strength of a mother’s love."
—Donna Everhart, USA Today bestselling author of The Education of Dixie Dupree

Metal artist Katie Mack is living a lie. Nine years ago she ran away from her family in Raleigh, North Carolina, consumed by the irrational fear that she would harm Maisie, her newborn daughter. Over time she's come to grips with the mental illness that nearly destroyed her, and now funnels her pain into her art. Despite longing for Maisie, Katie honors an agreement with the husband she left behind--to change her name and never return.

But when she and Maisie accidentally reunite, Katie can't ignore the familiarity of her child's compulsive behavior. Worse, Maisie worries obsessively about bad things happening to her pregnant stepmom. Katie has the power to help, but can she reconnect with the family she abandoned?

To protect Maisie, Katie must face the fears that drove her from home, accept the possibility of love, and risk exposing her heart-wrenching secret.

Bestselling author Barbara Claypole White writes hopeful family drama with a healthy dose of mental illness. Originally from England, she lives with her beloved OCD menfolk in the forests of North Carolina, where she has fourteen flowerbeds, one of which is home to Horace—a black snake who likes to scare the UPS guy. She is also an OCD Advocate for the A2A Alliance, a nonprofit group that promotes advocacy over adversity.

Barbara's novels include: The Unfinished Garden (2013 Golden Quill Best First Book); The In-Between Hour (Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance Winter 2014 Okra Pick); The Perfect Son (Goodreads Choice Awards Nominee for Best Fiction 2015); and Echoes of Family (Women's Fiction Writers Association 2017 Star Award Finalist).

To connect with Barbara, please visit www.barbaraclaypolewhite.com.

Blue Honey by Beth Copeland

The Broadkill River Press
$17.95, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-940120768
December, 2017
Poetry
Available from the publisher

Winner of the 2017 Dogfish Head Poetry Prize!

"The Blue Honey that flows through Copeland's collection by that name, through her parents' 'flurry of furious wings'—that flows through Japan, her siblings, an Alaskan airport, and The South, where a childhood was held by the ankles 'upside down and slapped'—that flows through a marriage, torn and mended, flows through it all with a fearless and loving spirit, with personality, humor, anger, and craft. Reader, I dare you to walk away from this elegy unmoved."
—Roger Weingarten, author of Ethan Benjamin Boldt (Knopf), Ghost-Wrestling (Godine), and The Four Gentlemen and Their Footmen (Longleaf, 2015)

"Beth Copeland's  is a lyrical case study of loss and the ways Blue Honeyin which it reverberates through a family's center ... Copeland is a master storyteller; she weaves each of these narratives seamlessly through the text, and her ear for language—not to mention her eye for the most delicate of details—is a veritable honey trap for the reader."
—Destiny Birdsong, MFA, Ph.D, recipient, Academy of American Poets Prize

"The structure of Blue Honey ... reenacts the circular journey that so many of us must make, from being cared for by our parents to ushering them through the mysterious borderland known as old age. Beth Copeland (writes) with breathtaking honesty ... metaphorically fresh and formally inventive ... Bravo to Copeland for not shying away from poetry's most arduous and important task, which is to write about life in a way that makes us feel less alone."
—Sue Ellen Thompson, editor The Autumn House Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and recipient of the 2010 Maryland Author Award

The poems in Blue Honey document Beth Copeland's father’s Alzheimer’s disease; her mother’s short-term memory loss; and their slow departure from this world. Not all of the poems are sad; some highlight the humor in forgetfulness. Beth hopes the poems will provide comfort to others experiencing the loss of loved ones.

Beth Copeland is the 2017-2018 Gilbert-Chappell Distinguished Poet for the central region of North Carolina. Her third full-length book Blue Honey received the 2017 Dogfish Head Poetry Prize. Transcendental Telemarketer was runner-up in the NC Poetry Society's 2013 Oscar Arnold Young Award for best poetry book by a North Carolina writer. Traveling through Glass received the 1999 Bright Hill Press Poetry Book Award. Her poetry has been published in many literary magazines and anthologies, and her work has been profiled by PBS NewsHour. She lives in a log cabin in rural Scotland County.

Time to Meet Max: Adventures in Guatemala with Anna and Cole by Gary Neil Gupton

IngramSpark
$8.99, paperback / $16.99, hardcover
ISBN: 978-0-692953969
November, 2017
Fiction: Children's Chapter Book
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

Time to Meet MAX:

Adventures in Guatemala!

“Here comes the tuk-tuk!” Anna and Cole travel to Antigua, Guatemala, seeking adventure. They ride in a chicken bus. “Do you know why they call it a chicken bus?” Well, do you? They ride horses to Volcano Pacaya. “Muy caliente!” They hike precarious jagged lava trails and jump off at the end—a hundred-meter gravelly slide. On the way they find something unexpected: a boy named Max. Max takes the children to places they’ve never been. He shows them things he cannot see. He shows them how to fly. Together. You too can fly.

Gary Neil Gupton has travelled to Guatemala on mission trips to build houses, distribute food and spread the love. He sailed on the eighteenth-century replica ship Endeavour. He took a walkabout in Key West with the spirit of Hemingway—to the Southernmost Point. He explored southern Spain, Panama, and Puerto Rico, by the canal and through rainforests. But his heart will always return to Guatemala where the children run barefoot—and teach us how to fly.

Loose Ends by Caroline Taylor

Moonshine Cove Publishing
$13.99, paperback / $5.99, e-book
ISBN: 978-1-945181-269
December, 2017
Fiction: Thriller
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

“Before you open Loose Ends, grip your hat firmly. Caroline Taylor expertly weaves multiple plot threads into a roller-coaster reading ride, twisty as a Slinky and unpredictable as a hurricane’s path.”
—Karen Pullen, author of Cold Feet and Cold Heart

“There’s nothing loose about Loose Ends. From the very first line, Caroline Taylor’s dark, zigzagging, and suspenseful narrative tightens the knot and doesn’t let up. You’ll want to devour it in one sitting.”
—Louis Bayard, author of Mr. Timothy and The Pale Blue Eye

“This book takes the sisters Cam and Carson through one disaster after another as they jump from the frying pan into the fire and back again. Whether fleeing criminals or the police, these two never run out of ingenious, if dangerous, escape plans. Taylor’s few-notches-above-suspense plot keeps raising the bar with every chapter. Will they survive?”
—Judy Hogan, author of the Penny Weaver mysteries and founding editor of Carolina Wren Press (now Blair)

WASHINGTON, D.C.—In the midst of Bicentennial celebrations, Carson Mahoney narrowly escapes a home invasion that reduces her house to rubble. In a West Virginia commune, her sister Cam kills the commune leader. Now both sisters must flee. Already a suspect in her secretive husband’s murder, Carson fears the police will suspect her of arson and put her in jail. It happened before, back when the two sisters were teenagers, imprisoned in a foreign country. It cannot happen again.

But running away is also not an option. Cam needs to find the innocent whose life she has saved. Carson must find the thugs who destroyed her home and her livelihood. All too soon, the sisters learn how impossible it is to hide and how difficult it is to trust those who offer help. Will they survive long enough to clear their names?

Caroline Taylor has written a tightly woven thriller full of female empowerment and bravery, with strong women seeking justice and formidable opponents in their way. With twists and turns, jolting from the present to the past, readers will be holding their breath until the very end.

Caroline Taylor is the author of two mystery novels, What Are Friends For? and Jewelry from a Grave; one nonfiction book, Publishing the Nonprofit Annual Report: Tips, Traps, and Tricks of the Trade, and numerous short stories and essays, which are featured on her website at www.carolinestories.com. She is a member of Mystery Writers of America, Sisters in Crime, and the North Carolina Writers’ Network. A longtime resident of Washington, DC, she now lives in North Carolina.

A Yorkie's Tale: Lessons from a Life Well-Lived by David L. Heaney

CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
$19.99, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-975991326
October, 2017
Fiction: Literary
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

"David Heaney has written a fascinating stealth book. From the gorgeous illustrations and the appealing Yorkie of the title, you might assume you were about to read a beguiling children's story. And you would be right (assuming the child has strong, direct parents who are willing to explore reality with their child). As you get deeper into the book you begin to sense that Heaney has snuck up on you and seduced you into an encounter with the demanding life events our culture is structured to paper over. The writing is straightforward, the animal conversations that children love and that disarms adults. Read it to your five-year-old, your aging friend, yourself, and you'll be drawn into a gentle but brave encounter with the conundrum of mortality. Discovering the reality of life that we're here for a season can be terrifying or incentive to embrace every day. With help from this Yorkie and his friend David Heaney, you may gain a new lease on living."
—Blayney Colmore

In this charming spiritual adventure, author and former pastor David L. Heaney uses the adventurous journey of a dog, a rat, and a parrot to impart important truths about the nature of life and the inevitability of death.

Niles, an aging Yorkie, has led a pampered life with his two loving owners and knows nothing of death. When his new friend Nathaniel, an inquisitive fruit rat, shares the puzzling tale of a family burying a sleeping cat, Niles's life begins to really change. Another neighborhood critter, an eccentric possum called Leach, explains to the two befuddled creatures that the cat wasn t simply sleeping it was dead.

Shaken by this revelation, Niles and Nathaniel decide they need to do something meaningful with their lives but what? They resolve to venture outside Niles s backyard, and with the help of Poppy, a friendly parrot, and guided by cryptic messages from a cat Niles encounters in his dreams, they begin to seek out answers.

Their travels take them from their own neighborhood through a canyon right to the edge of the ocean. Along the way, they encounter and benefit from the wisdom shared by others the seagulls, dolphins, and a visionary gorilla about the mysteries of life, and the grace that comes from living well unafraid of their own mortality.

David has spent his professional life as an Episcopal Priest, Psychotherapist, and consultant working with governments around the world with the development of their social assistance programs. He holds a M.Div. from the Divinity School at Yale University, a MA in Marriage and Family Therapy from the University of San Diego, and a BA from SUNY, College at Purchase. David lives with his wife, Lynda and their three dogs in Durham.

Opening the Mouth of the Dead by Catherine Woodard

lone goose press
$17.95, paperback / $1,750, limited-edition letterpress edition
ISBN: 978-0- 9905950-4-5
September, 2017
Poetry: Story in Poems
Available from the publisher or www.Amazon.com

“In this beautiful, haunted book, the author’s granddaddy asks her as a child, 'But what could I do?' The grown child says 'He asks as if I referee.' The child that survives catastrophic family history inevitably feels that she is a referee. The combatants are gone and were, always, not only powerful but unreadable. This child’s mind, facing a harrowing present and harrowing past, turns to a paradigm that she was given in the third grade: the Egyptian Book of the Dead. The ancient paradigm gives dignity and density to the tragedy of her parents’ lives. Litany, the insistent search for truth amid bewildering fragments, is what the survivor can perform to release, if not to save, the past. This is a superb book.”
—Frank Bidart, author of the forthcoming Half-light: Collected Poems 1965-2017and five previous collections, and winner of the Bollingen Prize for American Poetry and the Wallace Stevens Award

“Yes! This is news. In depth and energy, Catherine Woodard’s poetry penetrates the whole intense story. She has achieved a dazzling work.”
—Marie Ponsot, winner of the Poetry Society of America’s Frost Medal and Poetry magazine’s Ruth Lilly Prize for lifetime achievement and author of Collected Poems and six previous collections

“Like a yearning, incantatory prayer, these extraordinary poems build to an exquisite and devastating story of loss. With a child’s precision of observation made especially poignant through her third grade reading of the Egyptian Book of the Dead, Woodard’s narrator renders a brilliant portrait of a troubled family—a poem cycle truly remarkable for its economy, surprising humor, and sharp truths.”
—Kate Walbert, author of A Short History of Women, Our Kind, and other novels

The central character of Woodard’s first full-length poetry collection, Opening the Mouth of the Dead (September 7, 2017) is a third-grade girl growing up in 1960s North Carolina who uses the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead to navigate her complicated relationship with her father. She struggles to reconcile her heart with her brain in a family where her father grapples with alcoholism and depression.

Catherine Woodard is the author of Opening the Mouth of the Dead, a story in poems published by lone goose press in two editions: paperback and limited-edition book art. She helped return Poetry in Motion to the New York City subways and is a vice president of the Poetry Society of America. Her poems  have appeared in literary journals, anthologies, and CNN  online. A former journalist, Woodard chairs an advisory committee for the News Literacy Project.

Catfish by Madelyn Bennett Edwards

IngramSpark
$14.99, paperback / $8.99, e-book
ISBN: 978-0-9994027-0-2
October, 2017
Fiction: Coming of Age / Historical
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

It's the 1960s and early 70s in small-town south Louisiana. Susanna Burton, a white girl whose traumatic home life is hidden behind her father’s political power, finds acceptance and forbidden love with an African American family and a young black man named Rodney Thibault. Rodney provides the tenderness and warmth Susie has never known in an era when anti-miscegenation is the law of the land. Even after the Supreme Court strikes down such discrimination, the Ku Klux Klan, other white supremacists, and Susie’s parents stand in the way of love. Forced to go their separate ways and live several states apart for years on end, Susie and Rodney continually find their way back together.

At the heart of the novel, giving Susie and Rodney the strength to overcome the harshness of their world, and telling Susie stories of his family’s escape from slavery and oppression, is Catfish, patriarch of the black family that accepts Susie more fully than her own blood.

Race in America is growing more divisive even as mixed-race couples break barriers and bring more colorless children into the world. Why this divide exists is a thorn for Madelyn Edwards who was raised by a woman of color whom she still loves beyond measure.

In her debut novel, Catfish, Madelyn subtly explores the chasm between black and white families that existed in the Deep South in the 1960s and ‘70s when Jim Crow and the Ku Klux Klan defied federal laws.

If readers find themselves rooting for Rodney and Susie at the end of the book, Madelyn feels she has accomplished her task of blending color lines and making prejudice a forgotten emotion with Catfish.

Madelyn Bennett Edwards, or “Maddy,” as her friends call her, is a big believer in education, because she fought so hard to get one. She went to beauty school and put herself through college cutting hair, and graduated from Louisiana College wth a BA in Journalism at thirty-eight-years-old, a single mom with two children. She recently earned an MA in Writing at sixty-plus years old from Lenoir Rhyne University.

Maddy is a former television news reporter and producer who started her own company producing television vignettes for hospitals across the country. A Louisiana native, she started MBC in Alexandria, LA, moved it to Nashville, Tennessee in 1994, and sold it in 2003. She presently lives in Asheville with her architect husband, Gene. They have a dozen grandchildren in three states and spend their free time traveling, camping in their RV, and gardening.

Maddy writes about race in American in a way that attempts to bridge the divide.

One Window's Light: A Collection of Haiku edited with an introduction by Lenard D. Moore

Unicorn Press
$18.00, paperback / $25.00, hardcover / $35.00, special edition
ISBN: 978-0-87775-006-2
November, 2017
Poetry: Haiku
Available from the publisher

"A literal and metaphorical groundbreaker, this unique and indispensable collection contains a brilliant array of haiku by five members of the Carolina African American Writers' Collective, including founder and guiding spirit Lenard D. Moore, who serves as its editor. In the deft hands of Gideon Young, Sheila Smith McKoy, Crystal Simone Smith, and L. Teresa Church, we find strands of lyrical precision intertwined with earthy and treasured mundanities against a backdrop of emotionally transporting moments. Long before ecocriticism and ecopoetics entered their current vogue state, Moore shattered preconceptions by exploring the connections between Japanese and African American aesthetics. In this volume, we see his extraordinary skill as a revelatory poet in dialogue with four gifted writers who have been nurtured by his example and become literary leaders in their own right."
—Lauri Ramey, co-editor of Journal of Foreign Languages and Cultures

"This collection is a lighted window into lives of African American haiku poets with powerful connections to earth and family. The poems resonate with past and present horrors and with hope for the future."
—Ruth M. Yarrow, author of Lit from Within

"This collection is like a window that presents the light of insights into African American history and culture and offers fresh haiku for the reader to see, hear, touch, smell, and taste for a growth of sensibility, a moment of enlightenment, a rhythm of creative thinking, and an appreciation of African American heritage. The most impressive part of this collection is its focus on environment and current events, offering a clear point of view that haiku is not just about nature; it is also about human nature and society. Such an important haiku collection in American haiku history, One Window’s Light, as Moore states in his introduction, ‘extends the tradition’ of African American haiku already enriched by Lewis Alexander, Richard Wright, Etheridge Knight, James Emanuel, Sonia Sanchez, Kalamu ya Salaam, and many other younger black poets."
—John Zheng, editor of African American Haiku: Cultural Visions

Lenard D. Moore, a native of North Carolina and U.S. Army Veteran, is the founder and Executive Director of the Carolina African American Writers’ Collective. Moore’s work has appeared in over 400 publications, such as Callaloo, African American Review, Obsidian, Prairie Schooner, North Carolina Literary Review, and North American Review. His work also has appeared in over 100 anthologies, including The Haiku Anthology (Norton, 1999). His poetry has been translated into several languages. His books include The Open Eye (NC Haiku Society Press, 1985) andThe Open Eye, Limited 30th Anniversary Edition (Mountains & Rivers Press, 2015), among others. Another collection, The Geography of Jazz, is forthcoming. He is recipient of the Haiku Museum of Tokyo Award (1983, 1994, and 2003); 1992 First Prize Winner in Traditional Style Haiku sponsored by Mainichi Daily News (Tokyo, Japan); Sam Ragan Award in the Fine Arts (2006); Raleigh Medal of Arts for Lifetime Achievement (2008); and North Carolina Award for Literature (2014). He is a Cave Canem Fellow (1998-2000). He is former President of the Haiku Society of America and the longtime Executive Chairman of the NC Haiku Society. Mr. Moore, Associate Professor of English, teaches Creative Writing and African American Literature at the University of Mount Olive.

I Would, but My DAMN MIND Won't Let Me! by Jacqui Letran

A Healed Mind
$14.97, paperback / $4.97, e-book / $1.99, audiobook
ISBN: 978-0997624403
September, 2016
Nonfiction
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

Do you believe that life is unfair or that change is impossible? Are you unhappy and frustrated with your life? If you answered yes, you’re not alone! Teen Confidence Expert Jacqui Letran is here to show you a quick and easy path to a happier, healthier life. You can learn to create permanent changes for the better!

Your past can cause you to believe that making positive improvements requires a miracle. In Letran’s award-winning book I Would, but My DAMN MIND Won't Let Me! you will learn the simple steps to overcome your obstacles and struggles. Once you understand how your mind works, you will have the knowledge and power to take control of your thoughts and feelings. The power to challenge your old negative patterns and create the exact life you want is in your hands.

In this book, you will discover:

  • How to challenge old negative beliefs and create positive new patterns
  • How to stay calm and in control of even the most difficult situations
  • How to keep unhealthy thoughts at bay and replace them with positive ones
  • How to use the power of your mind to create the success you deserve
  • How to create positive life experiences and much, much more!

I Would, but My DAMN MIND Won't Let Me! is a groundbreaking guide to help you take control of your life. If you like real-life advice that works fast and doesn’t talk down to you, then you will love Jacqui Letran’s game-changing book for teens and young adults. This book is recommended for teens, parents of teens, professionals working with teens, and anyone who is interested in learning how to take control of their mind.

Jacqui Letran is a multi award-winning author, international speaker, nurse practitioner, and founder of Teen Confidence Academy and Healing Minds. She is passionate about her commitment to guiding her clients to achieve remarkable success in their academic, personal, and professional lives. Through private sessions, group workshops, and keynote engagements, Jacqui teaches that success and happiness are achievable by all, regardless of current struggles and circumstances. A gifted and energetic leader, Jacqui dedicates her life’s work to helping her clients and students transform into happy, confident, and successful people.

She is also the winner of the:

  • 2017 Literary Classics' Gold Medal for Young Adult Self-Help Books
  • 2016 Literary Classics' Lumen Award for Literary Excellence
  • 2016 Literary Classics' Gold Medal for Youth Adult Nonfiction
  • 2016 Readers' Favorite Gold Medal Award for Young Adult Nonfiction

Re-Write Men by Michael Gaspeny

Finishing Line Press
$14.99, paperback
ISBN: 978-1635343557
November, 2017
Poetry
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

“In these poems, we encounter characters as down-and-out, as demented, and as holy as Hazel Motes in Flannery O’Connor’s Wise Blood: Preacher Cruckshank, Stub, Mojo, Skeletal Stanley, Flipper. The persona is sometimes a neighbor on Redbud Lane, sometimes an animal advocate, often a hospice volunteer calling in on a hospital or ‘firetrap hotel’ to watch Bonanza or bring a last meal of cornbread and beans. In this world, so masterfully crafted with pain and compassion, it’s hard to tell the caregiver from the taker, the dying from the dead. Characters ‘crush cigarillos out on their palms,’ live with their ‘eyes tuned inside’ and climb into the attic to check the ‘rafters for something dangling.’ Yet, because near-death awareness may inform their outbursts—‘I’ll be back, but I ain’t Christ’ or ‘Watch the horses! The real show’s inside’—they offer revelations we may not yet know we need.”
–Janice Moore Fuller, author of Sex Education and On the Bevel

“There is a lovely, tough-but-tender-hearted mood to these gritty, noirish poems. If ‘the devil is in the details,’ then Gaspeny’s poems are indeed devilish, but the better angels are dancing there, too, and profligately. Strong sentiment held in check by formal clarity is so often the secret of memorable poems, and Gaspeny has learned that arduous lesson by heart. Strongly narrative and chock full of vivid characters and voices—Stub, Preacher Cruckshanks, Sister Rosetta, Flipper—Re-Write Men is a fond and fearful mash-up of Weegee and Philip Levine.”
–Jim Clark, author of Dancing on Canaan’s Ruins

As a poet, short-story writer, and reporter, Michael Gaspeny has published widely. For nearly four decades, he taught English and Journalism, mainly at Bennett College and High Point University, where he received the distinguished teaching award. While gaining an MFA in creative writing at the University of Arkansas, he worked as a sportswriter covering the Razorbacks and as a general assignments reporter. His features on Bill Clinton's first campaign for national office have been frequently quoted in biographies of the former president. Gaspeny holds an MA from the University of Richmond and an undergraduate degree from Randolph-Macon College. Michael has won the Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition and the O. Henry Festival Short Story Competition. For his service as a hospice volunteer, he was awarded the North Carolina Governor's Award for Excellence. He lives in Greensbor with his wife Lee Zacharias, the novelist and essayist. They have two sons.


CHARLOTTE—Registration is now open for the North Carolina Writers' Network's online class "The Tao of Self-Doubt: Ancient Wisdom for Modern Writers" led by Malcolm Campbell.

The class will take place on Thursday, February 16, at 7:00 pm, online. This course is capped at forty (40) registrants, first-come, first-served. There is a $25 fee to register.

Register here.

Writing is a difficult, lonely endeavor—one marked by occasional vacillation between self-doubt (“I’m a hack”) and grandiosity (“I’m the greatest writer ever”). Yet, self-doubt and heightened self-esteem are healthy, useful emotions for the writer, when they exist within certain limits. How can we put these and other emotions to use in our apprenticeship as writers? What are some effective means of preparing ourselves for the emotional realms of writing? Of working with editors and in writing groups? And of dealing with the time we spend alone, in reflection, both when we’re writing and when we’re not? Malcolm will present ten lessons—culled from Taoist, Buddhist, Christian, and Judaic teachings (plus from snippets of existential philosophy)—for how to work through the emotional demands on creative individuals. We’ll laugh, we’ll cry, we’ll sing Kumbaya.

Malcolm Campbell is the author of two adventure travel guidebooks, editor of professional golf instructor Dana Rader’s golf instructional book, Rock Solid Golf, and founder of the independent publishing house, Walkabout Press. In Malcolm’s twenty years as a commercial writer, he’s written everything from power-tool-accessory catalogs to television commercials to cover/feature stories for national magazines. Malcolm is the 2008 recipient of the Doris Betts Fiction Prize, a member of the NCWN Board of Trustees, and teaches in the University of North Carolina at Charlotte's Writing Program.

"The Tao of Self-Doubt: Ancient Wisdom for Modern Writers" is the North Carolina Writers' Network's third offering in their 2016-2017 Winter Series. The final class will be held in March.

"This new program initiative allows us to further our mission to connect and serve all the writers of North Carolina," said NCWN communications director Charles Fiore. "We view these online courses as a supplement to our current programs, and we remain committed to continuing to offer ample opportunities for all of us to get together face-to-face and in-person as well."

The online class "The Tao of Self-Doubt: Ancient Wisdom for Modern Writers" is available to anyone with an internet connection. Instructions for accessing the online class on Thursday, February 16, will be sent to registrants no less than twenty-four hours prior to the start of class.

Register here.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 


GREENSBORO—The Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition is now open for submissions.

The Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition accepts one-poem submissions. The contest awards the winner $200 and publication in storySouth. The deadline is Wednesday, March 1.

Final judge David Blair grew up in Pittsburgh. He is the author of three books of poetry: Ascension Days, which was chosen by Thomas Lux for the Del Sol Poetry Prize, Arsonville, and Friends with Dogs. His poems have appeared in Boston Review, Ploughshares, Slate Magazine, and many other places as well, including the anthologies The Best of Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet, Devouring the Green, and Zoland Poetry.

He has taught at the New England Institute of Art and in the M.FA. Writing Program at the University of New Hampshire. He lives in Somerville, Massachusetts, with his wife and daughter, and he has a degree in philosophy from Fordham University and an M.F.A. in creative writing from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Read his poem "Allies in Boston," for free, here. Read his poem "Gospel," here.

Sarah Huener of Durham won the 2016 Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition for her poem “To Pluto.” Ruth Moose of Pittsboro was named First Runner Up; Maria Rouphail, of Raleigh, received an Honorable Mention.

Read all the winning poems, and finalists, in Issue 42: Fall 2016 of storySouth.

The competition is administered by Terry L. Kennedy, Associate Director of the MFA in Creative Writing Program at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

storySouth is an online literary journal dedicated to showcasing the best poetry (and fiction and creative nonfiction) that writers from the "new south" have to offer. Facilitated by the Graduate Program in Creative Writing at UNCG, storySouth aims to prove that "the internet is not just a medium of flash and style; that excellent writing can attract attention without programming gimmicks and hard-to-read fonts." storySouth believes the American South today is a "mix of traditional and new, regional and international." Published poets include Cathy Smith Bowers, Al Maginnes, Dannye Romine Powell, and Elizabeth Swann.

 This competition honors the work and legacy of the poet and critic Randall Jarrell, who taught at what is now the University of North Carolina at Greensboro for nearly eighteen years. He was a 1996 inductee of the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame who left behind nine books of poetry, four books of literary criticism, four children’s books, five anthologies, a bestselling academic novel, a translation of Goethe’s Faust, Part I, and a translation of Chekhov’s The Three Sisters, produced on Broadway by The Actors’ Studio.

Here are the complete guidelines to the Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition:

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network.
  • The postmark deadline is March 1.
  • Entries can be submitted one of two ways:
    1. Send one printed copy through the U.S. Postal Service (see guidelines and address below), along with a check for the appropriate fee, made payable to the North Carolina Writers' Network.
    2. Submit an electronic copy online at http://ncwriters.submittable.com, and pay by VISA or MasterCard.
  • Poem will not be returned. If submitting by mail, include a self-addressed stamped envelope for a list of winner and finalists. The winner and finalists will be announced in May.
  • An entry fee must accompany the poem. Multiple submissions are accepted, one poem per entry fee: $10 for NCWN members, $15 for nonmembers.
  • You may pay member entry fee if you join the NCWN with your submission. Checks should be made payable to the North Carolina Writers’ Network.
  • Submissions should be one poem only (40-line limit).
  • Poem must be typed (single-spaced) and stapled in the left-hand corner.
  • Author's name should not appear on manuscripts. Instead, include a separate cover sheet with name, address, phone number, e-mail address, word count, and manuscript title. (If submitting online, do not include a cover sheet with your document; Submittable will collect and record your name and contact information.)
  • If submitting by mail, send submissions to:

Terry L. Kennedy
MFA Writing Program
3302 MHRA Building
UNC Greensboro
Greensboro, NC 27402-6170

The non-profit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

WINSTON-SALEM—At the moment, the North Carolina Writers’ Network has just shy of 1,400 members—and we want to know more about all of you.

A one-on-one conversation with each and every one of you would take the rest of this year, though, so we’ll just have to settle for another online survey.

Like the last survey we conducted, in 2011, all responses to this survey are completely voluntary and entirely anonymous. We need those responses, though, to give us a clear picture of who our members are.

Please take a few minutes (you should need no more than ten) and complete our 2016 Member Survey. Let us know more about who you are, where you are from, and what you are looking for.

Click HERE to begin the survey.

Your answers to our questions about you will help us answer your questions about writing. We appreciate your time and cooperation, as well as your membership in the North Carolina Writers’ Network.

 Many thanks to NCWN member Pamela Taylor for her help designing this survey.

 

GREENSBORO—The Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition is now open for submissions.

The Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition accepts one-poem submissions. The contest awards the winner $200 and publication in storySouth. The deadline is Tuesday, March 1.

Sarah Rose Nordgren will serve as the final judge. Nordgren is the author of the poetry collection Best Bones (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2014), which was selected by Ed Ochester for the Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize. Her poems appear widely in journals such as Ploughshares, American Poetry Review, Agni, and Copper Nickel. Among her awards are two fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center, an Individual Excellence Award from the Ohio Arts Council, and a Walter E. Dakin Fellowship from the Sewanee Writers Conference. Native to North Carolina, Nordgren is currently a doctoral student in poetry at the University of Cincinnati and Associate Editor at 32 Poems.

Read her poem "The Weed," for free, here. Read a review of her poetry collection, Best Bones, here

Gabrielle Freeman of Greenville, NC, won the 2015 Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition for her poem “Failure to Obliterate.” Maureen Sherbondy of Raleigh was named First Runner Up; Melissa Hassard, of the Triad, and Kathryn Kirkpatrick of Vilas, were given honorable mentions.

Read all the winning poems, and finalists, in Issue 39: Spring 2016 of storySouth.

The competition is administered by Terry L. Kennedy, Associate Director of the MFA in Creative Writing Program at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

storySouth is an online literary journal dedicated to showcasing the best poetry (and fiction and creative nonfiction) that writers from the "new south" have to offer. Facilitated by the Graduate Program in Creative Writing at UNCG, storySouth aims to prove that "the internet is not just a medium of flash and style; that excellent writing can attract attention without programming gimmicks and hard-to-read fonts." storySouth believes the American South today is a "mix of traditional and new, regional and international." Published poets include Cathy Smith Bowers, Al Maginnes, Dannye Romine Powell, and Elizabeth Swann.

 This competition honors the work and legacy of the poet and critic Randall Jarrell, who taught at what is now the University of North Carolina at Greensboro for nearly eighteen years. He was a 1996 inductee of the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame who left behind nine books of poetry, four books of literary criticism, four children’s books, five anthologies, a bestselling academic novel, a translation of Goethe’s Faust, Part I, and a translation of Chekhov’s The Three Sisters, produced on Broadway by The Actors’ Studio.

Here are the complete guidelines to the Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition:

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network.
  • The postmark deadline is March 1.
  • Entries can be submitted one of two ways:
    1. Send one printed copy through the U.S. Postal Service (see guidelines and address below), along with a check for the appropriate fee, made payable to the North Carolina Writers' Network.
    2. Submit an electronic copy online at http://ncwriters.submittable.com, and pay by VISA or MasterCard.
  • Poem will not be returned. If submitting by mail, include a self-addressed stamped envelope for a list of winner and finalists. The winner and finalists will be announced in May.
  • An entry fee must accompany the poem. Multiple submissions are accepted, one poem per entry fee: $10 for NCWN members, $15 for nonmembers.
  • You may pay member entry fee if you join the NCWN with your submission. Checks should be made payable to the North Carolina Writers’ Network.
  • Submissions should be one poem only (40-line limit).
  • Poem must be typed (single-spaced) and stapled in the left-hand corner.
  • Author's name should not appear on manuscripts. Instead, include a separate cover sheet with name, address, phone number, e-mail address, word count, and manuscript title. (If submitting online, do not include a cover sheet with your document; Submittable will collect and record your name and contact information.)
  • If submitting by mail, send submissions to:

Terry L. Kennedy
MFA Writing Program
3302 MHRA Building
UNC Greensboro
Greensboro, NC 27402-6170

 

NORTH CAROLINA—The 2016 Doris Betts Fiction Prize is now open for submissions. The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards the first-place winner $250 and publication in the North Carolina Literary Review. Finalists will also be considered for publication in NCLR.

The competition is for previously unpublished short stories up to 6,000 words. The Doris Betts Fiction Prize is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. North Carolina Literary Review subscribers with North Carolina connections (lives or has lived in NC) are also eligible.

The deadline is Monday, February 15.

The final judge is NCLR fiction editor Liza Wieland. She the author of seven books and three collections of short fiction. She has won two Pushcart Prizes, the Michigan Literary Fiction Prize, a Bridport Prize in the UK, and fellowships from The National Endowment for the Arts, The North Carolina Arts Council, and the Christopher Isherwood Foundation. She has recently been awarded a second fellowship from the North Carolina Arts Council. Her newest novel is Land of Enchantment.

For over twenty years, East Carolina University and the North Carolina Literary & Historical Association have published the North Carolina Literary Review, a journal devoted to showcasing the Tar Heel State’s literary excellence. Described by one critic as “everything you ever wanted out of a literary publication but never dared to demand,” the NCLR has won numerous awards and citations.

Doris Betts was the author of three short story collections and six novels. She won three Sir Walter Raleigh awards, the Southern Book Award, the North Carolina Award for Literature, the John Dos Passos Prize, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters Medal for the short story, among others. Beloved by her students, she was named the University of North Carolina Alumni Distinguished Professor of English in 1980. She was a 2004 inductee of the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame.

Brad Field of Wilmington won the 2015 Doris Betts Fiction Prize for his story, “Achmed’s Lesson,” a story offering deceptively simple language and a kind of cultural critique that transported readers to a world unfamiliar to many.

Kathryn Etters Lovatt’s “Eminent Domain,” a first-person reminiscence, won second place and also was selected for publication.

Here are the full guidelines for the 2016 Doris Betts Fiction Prize:

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. North Carolina Literary Review subscribers with North Carolina connections (lives or has lived in NC) are also eligible.
  • The competition is for previously unpublished short stories up to 6,000 words. Multiple entries ok, but each requires a separate entry fee. No novel excerpts. Stories do NOT have to relate to NCLR’s annual special feature topic.
  • The deadline is Monday, February 15
  • Simultaneous submissions ok, but please notify us immediately if your work is accepted elsewhere.
  • Submit previously unpublished stories online at https://nclr.submittable.com/submit. Submittable will collect your entry fee via credit card ($10 NCWN members or NCLR subscribers / $20 for non-members/non-subscribers).
  • To pay submission fees by check or money order, make payable to the North Carolina Writers Network and mail to: Ed Southern, PO Box 21591, Winston-Salem, NC 27120- 1591
  • Documents must be Microsoft Word or .rtf files. Author's name should not appear on manuscripts. (Submittable will collect and record your name and contact information.) If you have any problems submitting electronically, email NCLR's This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
  • If submitting by mail, mail story manuscript with a cover sheet providing name, address, email address, word count, and manuscript title, to:

NCLR
ECU Mailstop
555 English
Greenville, NC 27858-4353
(but mail payment to the Network as per instructions above)

The winner and finalists will be announced by May 1. The winning story and select finalists will be published in the next year’s issue of the North Carolina Literary Review.

Questions may be directed to Margaret Bauer, Editor of the North Carolina Literary Review, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Hats Off! to Eric Roe whose story "Bell," which will be published by Chautauqua this coming summer, has won Chautauqua's Editors Prize. Also, his essay "Joe New Hire's First Night" appeared in South 85 in December, and his essay "Machines" is forthcoming in The Tishman Review this spring.

 

Hats Off! to Denise Heinze whose debut novel Sally St. Johns (BookLocker, 2017) was favorably reviewed by Donna Meredith in Southern Literary Review. "The sassy narrator and her outlandish but devoted mother provoke frequent laughter," says Meredith. "The plot chuckles along to an unexpected but earned conclusion that left me wondering if the answer to our energy problems might be right under our behinds."

 

Hats Off! to Suzanne Cottrell whose poem "Snowfall Artistry" appears in the online Weekly Avocet, issue 268 (January 21, 2018). Her poem "Wintry Liberation" appears in the inaugural online issue of Cagibi Literary (January 15, 2018). And her poem "Abused" has been selected for the print issue of Unwanted Visitors published by Inwood Indiana, a subsidiary of Prolific Press, later this month.

 

Hats Off! to Consuelo Marshall whose poem "Myself as Playboy Bunny" won First Prize (£500) in the Verve Poetry Festival Competition, Birmingham, UK. Luke Kennard was the final judge. Consuelo will travel to take part in the poetry and spoken word festival, which runs February 15-18.

 

Hats Off! to Malaika Albrecht and Marty Silverthorne who are finalists to be The Heart of the Pamlico Poet Laureate. On February 3 at 7:00 pm, Albrecht and Silverthrone, along with other finalists, will give a reading to celebrate the power of words. Judges for the free event are John Hoppenthaler, Luke Whisnant, and Phillip Shabazz. "The Heart of Pamlico Poet Laureate will serve as the ambassador of Eastern North Carolina's vibrant literary life," says Eileen Lettick, a representative of the Pamlico Writers' Group, "promoting its poetic community and celebrating the written word in North Carolina, always mindful of the fact that poetry matters."

 

Hats Off! to Stephanie Andrea Allen whose essay "On Black Lesbian Femme Invisibility" appears in Sinister Wisdom 107, "Black Lesbians—We are the Revolution."

 

Hats Off! to Maryrose Carroll who reads from her book BEATS ME, Love, Poetry, Censorship from Chicago to Appalachia on Big Table Books. Big Table was born in 1958 through successful efforts to fight against censorship attempts by the University of Chicago, and the US Post Office.

 

Hats Off! to Laura Golden whose essay "Roots of Recovery" is forthcoming in the anthology Howling Up to the Sky: The Opioid Epidemic (PACT Press, February 2018). Quail Ridge Books in Raleigh will host a book release party and reading on February 2 at 7:00 pm.

 

Hats Off! to Suzanne Cottrell whose poem "Aged" appears in issue 85 of Burningword Literary Journal. Also, five of her flash fiction pieces were posted on Nailpolish Stories, A Tiny Colorful Journal.

 

 

Hats Off! to Heather Bell Adams whose debut novel Maranatha Road  (WVU Press, 2017) was favorably reviewed by Donna Meredith in Southern Literary Review. "Marantha Road is an exquisite story with characters so real they could step off the pages into your living room. All the strengths and flaws of small town life are laid bare."

 

Hats Off! to John Stickney of Leland who has two new poems in Uut Poetry, a magazine that celebrates Surrealism.

 

Hats Off! to Nancy Simpson Brantley who was presented with the Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award by Marquis Who's Who, the world's premier publisher of biographical profiles. Nancy has been "an active member of the North Carolina Writers' Network since its inception in 1985 and served on the Executive Board. In 1991 she co-founded the North Carolina Writers' Network-West, a program to serve writers in the remote areas of the North Carolina mountains. She served as program coordinator for ten years."

 

Hats Off! to North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame inductee A.R. Ammons (1926-2001) who was featured in The New Yorker (December 4, 2017). Two volumes of his complete poems have just been published by W.W. Norton & Company. "The majesty of Ammons’s achievement, scattered previously in more than twenty volumes, some out of print for decades, can now be recognized."

 

Hats Off! to Joan Leotta whose essay about Thanksgiving was published in Sasee Magazine. In December, her "The Seven Fishes" won the Wilda Morris Competition for poems about holidays gone awry. Visual Verse published two of her poems written in response to their December prompt. Betty Fedora published her mystery "The Dying Season," and Ruby for Women published the essay "January a New Start"; her poem "Opposite of Wishing in December;" and her essay "Thanksgiving, a Time of Hospitality in November." Writing in a Woman's Voice accepted her piece of flash fiction, "Lady of the Lake," and a poem, both of which will go live online in February.

 

Hats Off! to Suzanne Cottrell whose flash fiction piece "Garden Varieties" was selected for Nailpolish Stories' Best of 2017, which was posted online December 31, 2017. “'Best of 2017' stories were selected for their use of unique language, breadth of story in so few words, emotional impact, and the complex and original relationship of the titles to their stories."

Also, her nonfiction piece "Timeless Land" was a semi-finalist in Parks and Points' 2017 Fall Contest, and her poems "On Ice" and "Celestial Visions" are forthcoming in Poetry Quarterly.

 

Hats Off! to NCWN trustee Michele Tracy Berger whose novella "Reenu-You" was named a 2017 Top 10 Fantastical Book of the Triangle by Samuel Montgomery-Blinn of Indy Week. "Profane, funny, and moving, it's a taut, well-woven novella of friendship, loss, and abuse of power."

 

GREENSBORO—The North Carolina Writers’ Network 2015 Spring Conference will be held Saturday, April 18, in the MHRA Building and the Curry Auditorium on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Registration is now open.

This year’s faculty includes a multi-platinum songwriter, a 2014 inductee of the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame, an NEA grant recipient, and several longtime, distinguished instructors of creative writing. By creating a friendly, safe, but focused learning environment, Spring Conference offers attendees not only the chance to improve one’s writing but to learn how to successfully create a writing life—and flourish.

“You come to these conferences to learn how to comport yourself,” says Keith Flynn, founder and managing editor of the Asheville Poetry Review. “To develop the professionalism and humility that will allow you to make the connections and relationships necessary to build a vibrant literary career.”

Jaki Shelton Green, of Mebane, will give the Keynote Address. Green was inducted into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame in 2014, was the 2009 Piedmont Laureate, and in 2003 received the NC Award for Literature. Author of several poetry collections, she will also lead the poetry workshop “Conversations in the Lines.”

Joseph Mills, author of five poetry collections, will lead the Poetry Master Class, “Changing Stories.” Award-winning author Valerie Nieman, who teaches in the creative writing program at NC A&T State University, will lead the Fiction Master Class, “A Matter of Interpretation.” The Creative Nonfiction Master Class, “Creating Presence,” will be taught by Eric G. Wilson, author of four books including the forthcoming Keep It Fake: Inventing an Authentic Life (FSG, 2015).

Additional offerings include a poetry workshop with Rachel Richardson; fiction workshops with New York Times bestselling author Charlie Lovett and Jacob Paul; creative nonfiction with Marianne Gingher and Tom Maxwell (formerly of the Squirrel Nut Zippers); writing for children with award-winning author Eleanora E. Tate; and two workshops focused on the publishing industry: “Don’t Forget the Small Stuff: Building Your Career” with Press 53 publisher Kevin Morgan Watson and “The Art of Branding for Authors” with Faun Finley.

The Network also will offer a brand-new program this year: “Slush Pile Live!”

Throughout the day, attendees are encouraged to drop off either 300 words of prose or one page of poetry at the registration table. The author’s name should not appear on the manuscript. At 5:00 pm, a panel of editors will listen as the submissions are read out loud, and raise their hand when they hear something that would make them stop reading if the piece were being submitted to their publication. The editors will discuss what they did and did not like about the sample, offering constructive feedback on the manuscript itself and the submission process. All anonymous—all live!

“If you’ve never worked or volunteered for a publisher or literary magazine before, the submission process can seem kind of mysterious,” says NCWN Executive Director Ed Southern. “‘Slush Pile Live!’ will give attendees a peak into what goes through an editor’s mind as they read their way through a stack of unsolicited submissions, with the added bonus of giving feedback to anonymously submitted manuscripts in a non-threatening way.”

In addition to new programming, familiar features will remain, including faculty readings, an open mic for conference participants, an exhibit hall packed with publishers and literary organizations, and “Lunch with an Author,” where conference-goers can spend less time waiting in line and more time talking with the author of their choice. Spaces in “Lunch with an Author” are limited and are first-come, first-served. Pre-registration and an additional fee are also required for this offering.

The NCWN 2015 Spring Conference is sponsored in part by 88.5 WFDD Public Radio and UNCG’s Creative Writing Program. Free parking for Spring Conference registrants will be available in the Oakland Avenue Parking Deck, across Forest Street from the MHRA Building (behind Yum Yum Better Ice Cream and Old Town Draught House).

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, and to register, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

GREENSBORO—The Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition is now open for submissions.

The Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition accepts one-poem submissions. The contest awards the winner $200 and publication in storySouth. The deadline is Sunday, March 1.

William Wright will serve as the final judge. The winner of the 2012 Porter Fleming Prize for Poetry, he is the author of four full-length poetry collections, including the forthcoming Tree Heresies (Mercer University Press). His chapbook Sleep Paralysis (Stepping Stones Press, 2012) won the South Carolina Initiative Prize. His work has appeared in various literary journals including Kenyon Review, Crab Orchard Review, and The Southern Poetry Review.

Wright is the founding editor of Town Creek Poetry and series editor of The Southern Poetry Anthology. He currently serves as a contributing editor for Shenandoah and has reviewed poetry and interviewed poets for Oxford American. In February, Wright will serve as a visiting writer at Eastern Washington University in Spokane, Washington, and the Writer-In-Residence at the University of Tennessee in the spring of 2016.

A sample of his poetry can be read, for free, in Issue 38: 2014 of storySouth.

Davidson poet Alan Michael Parker won the 2014 Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition for his poem, “Lights Out in a Chinese Restaurant.” Maureen Sherbondy of Raleigh was named First Runner Up; Melissa Hassard, of the Triad, and Kathryn Kirkpatrick of Vilas, were given honorable mentions.

This competition is administered by Terry L. Kennedy, Associate Director of the MFA in Creative Writing Program at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

storySouth is an online literary journal dedicated to showcasing the best poetry (and fiction and creative nonfiction) that writers from the "new south" have to offer. Facilitated by the Graduate Program in Creative Writing at UNCG, storySouth aims to prove that "the internet is not just a medium of flash and style; that excellent writing can attract attention without programming gimmicks and hard-to-read fonts." storySouth believes the American South today is a "mix of traditional and new, regional and international." Published poets include Cathy Smith Bowers, Al Maginnes, Dannye Romine Powell, and Elizabeth Swann.

 

This competition honors the work and legacy of the poet and critic Randall Jarrell, who taught at what is now the University of North Carolina at Greensboro for nearly eighteen years. He was a 1996 inductee of the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame who left behind nine books of poetry, four books of literary criticism, four children’s books, five anthologies, a bestselling academic novel, a translation of Goethe’s Faust, Part I, and a translation of Chekhov’s The Three Sisters, produced on Broadway by The Actors’ Studio.

Here are the complete guidelines to the Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition:

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network.
  • The postmark deadline is March 1.
  • Entries can be submitted one of two ways:
    1. Send one printed copy through the U.S. Postal Service (see guidelines and address below), along with a check for the appropriate fee, made payable to the North Carolina Writers' Network.
    2. Submit an electronic copy online at http://ncwriters.submittable.com, and pay by VISA or MasterCard.
  • Poem will not be returned. If submitting by mail, include a self-addressed stamped envelope for a list of winner and finalists. The winner and finalists will be announced in May.
  • An entry fee must accompany the poem. Multiple submissions are accepted, one poem per entry fee: $10 for NCWN members, $15 for nonmembers.
  • You may pay member entry fee if you join the NCWN with your submission. Checks should be made payable to the North Carolina Writers’ Network.
  • Submissions should be one poem only (40-line limit).
  • Poem must be typed (single-spaced) and stapled in the left-hand corner.
  • Author's name should not appear on manuscripts. Instead, include a separate cover sheet with name, address, phone number, e-mail address, word count, and manuscript title. (If submitting online, do not include a cover sheet with your document; Submittable will collect and record your name and contact information.)
  • If submitting by mail, send submissions to:

Terry L. Kennedy
MFA Writing Program
3302 MHRA Building
UNC Greensboro
Greensboro, NC 27402-6170

 

NORTH CAROLINA—The 2015 Doris Betts Fiction Prize is now open for submissions. The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards the first-place winner $250 and publication in the North Carolina Literary Review. Finalists will also be considered for publication in the NCLR.

For over twenty years, East Carolina University and the North Carolina Literary & Historical Association have published the North Carolina Literary Review, a journal devoted to showcasing the Tar Heel State’s literary excellence. Described by one critic as “everything you ever wanted out of a literary publication but never dared to demand,” the NCLR has won numerous awards and citations.

The competition is for previously unpublished short stories up to 6,000 words. The Doris Betts Fiction Prize is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. North Carolina Literary Review subscribers with North Carolina connections (lives or has lived in NC) are also eligible.

The final judge is NCLR fiction editor Liza Wieland. She the author of seven books and three collections of short fiction. She has won two Pushcart Prizes, the Michigan Literary Fiction Prize, a Bridport Prize in the UK, and fellowships from The National Endowment for the Arts, The North Carolina Arts Council, and the Christopher Isherwood Foundation. She has recently been awarded a second fellowship from the North Carolina Arts Council.

Laura Herbst of Pittsboro won the 2014 Doris Betts Fiction Prize for her story, “The Cliffs of Mobenga.” Two finalists from the 2014 competition were invited to revise and resubmit their stories for publication consideration: “World Without End” by Taylor Brown of Wilmington and “Big Joy Family” by Jude Whelchel of Asheville.

Doris Betts was the author of three short story collections and six novels. She won three Sir Walter Raleigh awards, the Southern Book Award, the North Carolina Award for Literature, the John Dos Passos Prize, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters Medal for the short story, among others. Beloved by her students, she was named the University of North Carolina Alumni Distinguished Professor of English in 1980. She was a 2004 inductee of the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame.

 

 

Here are the guidelines for the 2015 Doris Betts Fiction Prize. The deadline is February 15:

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. North Carolina Literary Review subscribers with North Carolina connections (lives or has lived in NC) are also eligible.
  • The competition is for previously unpublished short stories up to 6,000 words. One entry per writer. No novel excerpts. Stories do NOT have to relate to NCLR’s annual special feature topic.
  • Submit previously unpublished stories online at https://nclr.submittable.com/submit. Submittable will collect your entry fee via credit card ($10 NCWN members or NCLR subscribers / $20 for non-members/non-subscribers).
  • To pay submission fees by check or money order, make payable to the North Carolina Writers Network and mail to: Ed Southern, PO Box 21591, Winston-Salem, NC 27120- 1591
  • Documents must be Microsoft Word or .rtf files. Author's name should not appear on manuscripts. Instead, include a separate cover sheet with name, address, phone number, e-mail address, word count, and manuscript title. (If submitting online, do not include a cover sheet with your document; Submittable will collect and record your name and contact information.) If you have any problems submitting electronically, email NCLR's This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The winner and finalists will be announced in April. The winning story and select finalists will be published in the next year’s issue of the North Carolina Literary Review.

Questions may be directed to Margaret Bauer, Editor of the North Carolina Literary Review, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

 

Pirate Queen: Book of the Navigator by H.N. Klett

Raven Rock Press
$14.99, paperback / $3.99, e-book
ISBN: 978-0-9979699-0-0
January, 2017
Fiction: YA/Sci Fi-Fantasy
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

“H.N. Klett’s debut fantasy novel is good old traditional fun! A swashbuckling universe with lots of surprises, revelations, battles, turnabouts, and humor—you name it. Just what we expect from the genre and more. Way to go, Mr. Klett!”
—Fred Chappell, former Poet Laurette of NC and the award-winning author of Dagon and A Shadow All of Light

Hailey Heartstone did not have an ordinary childhood. The only daughter of a merchant sailor, she grew up climbing ship’s rigging, balancing high above decks, but lately Hailey struggles to find the balance in her life. She fears that her days on the sea are coming to an end and that a course has been plotted for her that will end in a stifling arranged marriage. But all that is about to change.

In one fateful moment, Hailey’s life is ripped from its safe and predictable course and thrust into a storm of peril. She stumbles upon an ancient book and unlocks a dangerous power that thrusts her into a world full of deadly mists and phantom pirates intent on recovering what once was theirs.

Kidnapped from her family, Hailey must face true fear as she is forced into a journey to protect the power that she found and seek out those willing to help her save all that she loves before it is too late.

In this thrilling fantasy adventure, a young girl gifted with untapped abilities unlocks a dangerous power and must find her inner strength in time to fight the battle of her life, to save her family, and protect all that she holds dear. Fraught with twists and turns, H.N.Klett weaves an exhilarating adventure filled with magical powers, pirate clashes, hidden treasure, and unlikely friendships.

H.N.Klett is a writer, podcast producer, warrior poet, and (possibly) a madman, who hails from Raleigh. A natural storyteller, H.N. has been writing and telling tales since he was a little boy, inundating teachers, professors, and anyone who would listen with his poetry, plays, short stories and novels. He uses life experiences of creating and breaking things to weave stories of intrigue, fantasy, science fiction, and humor.

He has been described as a maniac armed with a pen and has created a swath of destruction in his wake. In the process of creating his first book he successfully broke an unbreakable computer, shattered a shatterproof case, and annihilated several other machines much to the chagrin of his friends and loved ones. He is kept in Greensboro, for your safety.

You can (safely) visit him at www.hnklett.com.

The Ruin Season by Kristopher Triana

Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing
$14.95, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-943720071
June, 2016
Fiction: Southern Gothic / Crimei Noir
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

"The Ruin Season by Kristopher Triana portrays mental illness and small town dynamics with a grit and a fearlessness I've rarely seen before."
Dead End Follies

"Richly rendered in character and setting, and an emotional clarity that rings that Lansdale/McCarthy bell and puts the thrill in thriller."
Ginger Nuts of Horror

"I wouldn’t be surprised to find this on a few best of lists come the end of the year. I know it will definitely be on mine. Absolutely superb."
The Grim Reader

Jake Leonard has his share of trouble.

He’s close to forty now and still suffers from bipolar disorder and the painful memories of the psychotic episodes that derailed his life and sent him behind bars as a youth. He lives in the rural south where he spends his days breaking horses and his nights training dogs in solitude. His nineteen-year-old girlfriend, Nikki, is the daughter of the sheriff, and she’s just getting worse with drugs, alcohol and satanic metal, eventually leading into heroin and low-budget porn. When Jake reconnects with his ex-wife, things get even more complicated, and the limits of love and sanity get pushed to the breaking point.

The Ruin Season is a haunting tale of a mentally ill man struggling in a cruel world. It is a story of unrequited love and bloody revenge. It moves forward in the style of gritty southern gothic novels, in the tradition of Daniel Woodrell, Stewart O'Nan, and Cormac McCarthy. It shows both the tender and horrible sides of mental illness as well as the seedy underbelly of small town America.

Kristopher Triana is the author of The Ruin Season, Body Art, and Growing Dark, the latter of which was called "a must read" by Rue Morgue Magazine. His work has appeared in many magazines and anthologies, including the D.O.A Extreme Horror series, The Year's Best Hardcore Horror, and Stiff Things, to name a few. His work has been translated to Russian, and Festa Verlag will be releasing a German-language edition of his novel Body Art in late 2017. He had drawn praise from Cemetery Dance, Publisher's Weekly, Rue Morgue Magazine,The Ginger Nuts of Horror, and The Horror Fiction Review.

He works as a professional dog trainer and lives in North Carolina with his wife.

Seasons in the Garden by Sandra Fischer

Evergood Books
$9.95, paperback
ISBN: 978-0996838009
November, 2015
Nonfiction: Gardening
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

Ever since the first garden appeared on earth and seasons were set in place, human kind has been subject to, as well as inspired by, the changes taking place in nature and in people. In spring new life appears, followed by summer’s flowering, fall’s fruition and finally winter’s rest. The seasons of both nature and humans possess many parallels as found in the author’s reflections in Seasons in the Garden. Through prose and poetry, scripture verses and illustrations, the reader can journey through the seasons and contemplate the likenesses found within nature and humanity.

Seasons in the Garden is a collection of inspirations written over fifty seasons of the author's life for the Dataw Island Garden Club. Sandra Fischer's observations show insightful parallels in the seasons of gardening and nature as they relate to the seasons of humanity. Through poetry and prose she guides us through the seasons.

Sandra Fischer taught high school English and owned a Christian bookstore in Indiana for several years. Much of her writing is devoted to stories of inspiration gleaned from her experiences growing up in the Midwest. She has been published in Guideposts, Faithwriters Magazine online, and in several anthologies. Sandra retired and lived in South Carolina for fifteen years before relocating to Southern Pines in 2016 where she continues to write inspirational articles and create new stories. She is a platinum member of www.Faithwriters.com where many of her writings are found.

The Fish Tank: and Other Short Stories by Maria Elena Alonso-Sierra

Maria Elena Alonso-Sierra
$5.75, paperback / $1.99, e-book
ISBN: 978-0998257402
December, 2016
Fiction: Short Stories
Available from www.Amazon.com

A collection of short stories from the mind of romantic suspense author Maria Elena Alonso-Sierra that will take your imagination on a ride across all genres.

Delve into For the Fun of Writing, where flights of fancy are given voice in “Jerry’s Gift” and “Rites of Passage.” Glide into Soul Songs, stories from the Cuban Diaspora, where the author weaves many of her own exile experiences in “The Fish Tank” (award winner), “Bubbles Don’t Bring Smiles,” “Lullaby,” and “A Day in the Life of Benito José Fuentes.” Take a peek at Prologues, two prequel short stories that introduce characters in upcoming novels. Twists and turns run rampant in “Into the Light,” and “Mirror, Mirror: A Detective Nick Larson Story.” Finally, enjoy The End, a short-short of whimsy in “Everyone’s a Critic.”

Ms. Alonso-Sierra is the author of two romantic suspense novels, The Coin and The Book of Hours. She holds a Masters in English literature and has worked as a professional dancer, singer, journalist, and literature teacher. When not writing, she roams around to discover new places to set her novels. She is currently working on her third, full-length novel.

Rosa and the Red Apron by Joan Leotta

Theaq Publishing
$12.95, paperback / $2.99, e-book
ISBN: 978-1-681890319
November, 2016
Children's: Ages 3-9
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

Join Rosa in this next book of the Rosa series, Rosa and the Red Apron, as she demonstrates being helpful through modeling of the folktale, "Little Red Hen," read to her by her mother. Rosa helps her mother make cookies for Grandma's birthday party where Rosa receives a surprise gift.

Including essays, poetry, short stories and young adult fiction, Joan Leotta is a versatile and award-winning author, poet, and story performer. Leotta has been playing with words on paper and on stage from the first time she could hold a pen and climb. She gathers inspiration for writing and performing from everyday incidents and objects. She has been a story performer, mostly for children, for more than thirty years--including historic characters and folklore shows. To her credit are four young adult novels, numerous plays and poems, and a picture book called WHOOSH! Joan attended Ohio University and Johns Hopkins, where she concentrated on international relations and economics. Joan grew up in Pittsburgh now lives, and spends a lot of time walking the North Carolina beaches, with her husband Joe. Her motto is "encouraging others through pen and performance."

Russ HatlerNORTH CAROLINA—Welcome to the new website of the North Carolina Writers’ Network! Things are grouped a little differently now than they were on our old site, so here are a few tips to help you get oriented:

At the top of the page is a menu bar. If you’re looking for any information about the Network, including contact info, it’s under “About Us.”

If you’re looking for information about conferences, competitions, or hunting for our events calendar, that’s under “Programs and Services.”

Hats Off!, Book Buzz, and other sections that showcase our members are under “Our Members.”

And if you’re a member of NCWN, you can sign in and then access the “Members Only” section, which includes “Opportunities” and contacts for “Literary Agents and Editors.” But you must be a current member, and you must sign in, to access this section.

Below the menu bar are graphics which link to our White Cross School Blog, the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame, and one of our current contests, the 2014 Doris Betts Fiction Prize.

A bit farther down the right-hand side of the page is a menu of links. In redesigning our site, we decided there are other organizations who keep much better databases of things like funding opportunities, literary magazines, and publishers than we ever could. So most of these menu items link to trustworthy, outside sites. Enjoy!

Another major change is that, in order to submit your news to Hats Off! or Book Buzz, or submit an event for an inclusion in our events calendar, there’s no longer any need to e-mail us. Simply click on the link(s) provided, fill out the appropriate form, and we’ll take care of the rest.

Can’t find something? See a typo? Something not working right? E-mail Charles Fiore, Communications Director, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

NORTH CAROLINA—The 2014 Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition is now open for submissions. This contest awards the first-place winner $200 and publication in storySouth.

The 2014 Randall Jarrell Competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. Submissions should be one poem only (40-line limit). The contest deadline is March 1.

The final judge is Jillian Weise, author of The Book of Goodbyes (BOA Editions, 2013), which received the 2013 James Laughlin Award from the Academy of American Poets, which recognizes a superior second book of poetry by an American poet. Her debut poetry collection, The Amputee’s Guide to Sex, was published by Soft Skull Press in 2007. Weise is also the author of the novel The Colony (Counterpoint/Soft Skull Press, 2010). Her other honors include a Fulbright Fellowship and the 2013 Isabella Gardner Poetry Award from BOA Editions. She teaches at Clemson University and lives in Greenville, South Carolina.

storySouth is an online literary journal dedicated to showcasing the best poetry (and fiction and creative nonfiction) that writers from the "new south" have to offer. Facilitated by the Graduate Program in Creative Writing at UNCG, storySouth aims to prove that "the internet is not just a medium of flash and style; that excellent writing can attract attention without programming gimmicks and hard-to-read fonts." storySouth believes the American South today is a "mix of traditional and new, regional and international." Published poets include Cathy Smith Bowers, Al Maginnes, Dannye Romine Powell, and Elizabeth Swann.

This competition honors the work and legacy of the poet and critic Randall Jarrell, who taught at what is now the University of North Carolina at Greensboro for nearly eighteen years. The competition is administered by Terry L. Kennedy and the Graduate Program in Creative Writing at UNCG.

Alan Michael Parker won the 2013 Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition for his poem, "The Ladder." Joseph Mills, Katherine Soniat, and Ross White received honorable mentions.

Here are the eligibility requirements and guidelines:

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network.
  • Submissions should be one poem only (40-line limit).
  • Poem must be typed (single-spaced) and stapled in the left-hand corner.
  • Author's name should not appear on the poem. Instead, include a separate cover sheet with author's name, address, e-mail address, phone number, and poem title.
  • Poem will not be returned. Include a self-addressed stamped envelope for a list of winner and finalists. The winner and finalists will be announced in May.
  • An entry fee must accompany the poem. Multiple submissions are accepted, one poem per entry fee: $10 for NCWN members, $15 for nonmembers.
  • You may pay member entry fee if you join the NCWN with your submission. Checks should be made payable to the North Carolina Writers’ Network.
  • Send submissions to:

Terry L. Kennedy
MFA Writing Program
3302 MHRA Building
UNC Greensboro
Greensboro, NC 27402-6170

NORTH CAROLINA—If you are a writer of creative nonfiction, who has been on the fence about sending in an entry to the Rose Post Creative Nonfiction Competition, then now would be a good time to hop down and submit.

Thanks to a generous donation from Rose Post’s family, the prize amounts that will be awarded for the top three entries in this contest have been increased: $200 for 3rd Place; $300 for 2nd Place; and $1,000 for 1st Place.

The winning entry will still be considered for publication by Southern Cultures magazine, as well.

The Rose Post Creative Nonfiction Competition encourages the creation of lasting nonfiction that is outside the realm of conventional journalism and has relevance to North Carolinians. Subjects may include traditional categories such as reviews, travel articles, profiles or interviews, place/history pieces, or culture criticism.

The postmark deadline for entries into the 2014 contest is Friday, January 17. Online submissions must be received before midnight on that date.

This year’s final judge is Hannah Dela Cruz Abrams, whose novella The Man Who Danced with Dolls won a 2013 Whiting Writers’ Awards of $50,000, one of the richest prizes in American literature. She holds an MFA (’07) from the University of North Carolina Wilmington, where she now teaches in the English Department. She is the recipient of a North Carolina Arts Council Fellowship, a Rona Jaffe Writer’s Award, a Hartshook Fellowship, and a Byington Award. Born on Guam, Abrams is currently at work on her memoir, The Following Sea, about growing up on a cutter that made port throughout the South Pacific.

Rose Post worked for the Salisbury Post for fifty-six years as a reporter, feature writer, and columnist. She won numerous state and national awards for her writing and earned the N.C. Press Women's top annual award four times. She received the O. Henry Award from the Associated Press three times, the Pete Ivey Award, and the School Bell Award for educational coverage. Nationally, she won the 1989 Ernie Pyle Award, the Scripps Howard Foundation National Journalism Award for human-interest writing, and the 1994 National Society of Newspaper Columnists' Award.

Here are the complete guidelines:

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network.
  • The postmark deadline is January 17.
  • The entry fee is $10 for NCWN members, $12 for nonmembers.
  • Entries can be submitted in one of two ways:
    1. Send two printed copies through the U.S. Postal Service (see guidelines and address below), along with a check for the appropriate fee, made payable to the North Carolina Writers' Network.
    2. Submit an electronic copy online at http://ncwriters.submittable.com, and pay by VISA or MasterCard.
  • Each entry must be an original and previously unpublished manuscript of no more than 2,000 words, typed in a 12-point standard font (i.e., Times New Roman) and double-spaced.
  • Author's name should not appear on manuscript. Instead, include a separate cover sheet with name, address, phone number, e-mail address, word count, and manuscript title. If submitting electronically, page 1 should be your cover sheet.
  • An entry fee must accompany the manuscript. Multiple submissions are accepted, one manuscript per entry fee: $10 for NCWN members, $12 for nonmembers.
  • You may pay the member entry fee if you join the NCWN with your submission. Checks should be made payable to the North Carolina Writers’ Network.
  • Entries will not be returned. Winners will be announced in March.
  • Send submission to:
North Carolina Writers' Network
ATTN: Rose Post
PO Box 21591
Winston-Salem, NC 27120

 

 NORTH CAROLINA—The 2014 Doris Betts Fiction Prize is now open for submissions. The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards the first-place winner $250 and publication in the North Carolina Literary Review. Finalists will also be considered for publication in the NCLR.

For over twenty years, East Carolina University and the North Carolina Literary & Historical Association have published the North Carolina Literary Review, a journal devoted to showcasing the Tar Heel State’s literary excellence. Described by one critic as “everything you ever wanted out of a literary publication but never dared to demand,” the NCLR has won numerous awards and citations.

The Doris Betts Fiction Prize is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. North Carolina Literary Review subscribers with North Carolina connections (lives or has lived in NC) are also eligible.

The final judge is NCLR fiction editor Liza Wieland (left). She the author of seven books and three collections of short fiction. She has won two Pushcart Prizes, the Michigan Literary Fiction Prize, a Bridport Prize in the UK, and fellowships from The National Endowment for the Arts, The North Carolina Arts Council, and the Christopher Isherwood Foundation. She has recently been awarded a second fellowship from the North Carolina Arts Council.

Claudette Cohen of Carolina Beach won the 2013 Doris Betts Fiction Prize for her story, “The Mayor of Biscoe.”

Doris Betts was the author of three short story collections and six novels. She won three Sir Walter Raleigh awards, the Southern Book Award, the North Carolina Award for Literature, the John Dos Passos Prize, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters Medal for the short story, among others. Beloved by her students, she was named the University of North Carolina Alumni Distinguished Professor of English in 1980.

Here are the guidelines for the 2014 Doris Betts Fiction Prize:

Doris Betts Fiction Prize
Submission Deadline: February 15 (annual)

The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards the first-prize winner $250 and publication in the North Carolina Literary Review. Finalists will also be considered for publication in the NCLR.

Eligibility and Guidelines

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. North Carolina Literary Review subscribers with North Carolina connections (lives or has lived in NC) are also eligible.
  • The competition is for previously unpublished short stories up to 6,000 words. One entry per writer. No novel excerpts. Stories do NOT have to relate to NCLR’s annual special feature topic.
  • Submit previously unpublished stories online at https://nclr.submittable.com/submit. Submittable will collect your entry fee via credit card ($10 NCWN members or NCLR subscribers / $20 for non-members/non-subscribers).
  • To pay submission fees by check or money order, make payable to the North Carolina Writers Network and mail to: Ed Southern, PO Box 21591, Winston-Salem, NC 27120- 1591
  • Documents must be Microsoft Word or .rtf files. The author’s name should not appear in the story file. Title the file with the story’s title to connect the story with your name. If you have any problems submitting electronically, email NCLR's This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

The winner and finalists will be announced in April. The winning story and select finalists will be published in the next year’s issue of the North Carolina Literary Review.

Questions may be directed to Margaret Bauer, Editor of the North Carolina Literary Review, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

A Life Time in Reverse: What's on Your Bucket List? by Chuck Werle

CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
$9.00, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-508835752
September, 2015
Memoir
Available from www.Amazon.com

The online book is divided into two major sections: Mine and Yours. The first evolves from cruising through the author's experience over six decades to the second, where readers learn how to form their own lifelong Bucket Lists from seventy suggestions that could have affected their lives.

The 13,000-word mini-book features thirty-eight episodes or chapters, often including lessons to be learned.

The episodes and events are divided into five sections to expedite the process: personal, humor, adventure/travel, careers, and sports/hobbies.

Chuck Werle wears many hats. In the past two years. Chuck has concentrated on helping other authors by editing their manuscripts and promoting finished products. He also managed to write his second book. In 2009, he authored his first book, From Tee to Green in the Carolina Mountains. It was published by iUniverse in Bloomington, Indiana, and is available on Amazon and from your local bookstore. During that period, he was a golf columnist for the Laurel of Asheville magazine, until 2010.

He is also principal of Carolina Image Builders, a public relations counseling firm with a national reputation in media relations and crisis communications.

Werle retired to Asheville from Chicago in 2000 after he was chosen the Outstanding Public Relations Executive by both Chicago chapters of the Public Relations Society of America.

A native of Lapeer, Michigan, he earned a BA degree in Journalism from Michigan State University and advanced degrees from the University of Illinois—Chicago and San Jose University Institute. He began his public relations career with Miller Brewing Company after four years as a reporter for the Milwaukee Journal.

The Haunting of William Gray by Renee Canter Johnson

The Wild Rose Press, Inc.
$16.99, paperback / $5.99, e-book
ISBN: 9781509204366
November, 2015
Fiction: Romance
Available from www.Amazon.com

Can Madeline Waters capture a picture of the ghost William Gray believes is haunting him? Others have caught some shadowy figures on film at the Antebellum house, built in the eighteen hundreds on a privately-owned island, in Winyah Bay, South Carolina.

A single photo would result in William granting permission for her to use the private journals of his long-dead ancestor and namesake, Captain William Gray, in her thesis research.

Madeline's disbelief in the supernatural isn’t helpful and she wonders if the wealthy loner is suffering a mental collapse until she experiences the ghost of the Captain herself. Saving her from drowning, he floods her with the emotions she has longed for, and opens a dimension for her previously thought to be pure fantasy.

Is it possible to fall in love with an apparition, or will she be able to aid in setting his spirit free? With help from a local Gullah woman's knowledge of voodoo, the mystery unravels. In the process, William and Madeline's hearts also become entwined.

Renee Canter Johnson was born in North Carolina, where she still resides. She has studied in France, Italy, and has been awarded two terms at Noepe Center for Literary Arts on Martha's Vineyard.

 

Waiting on Unknown Roads by Sara Claytor

Main Street Rag
$14.00, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-59948-538-6
November, 2015
Poetry
Available from the publisher

"In this stunning collection, Sara Claytor perfectly captures the archetype of the Wise Crone—not to be confused with any sort of pathetic figure, but a human being at the pinnacle of her earthly power—a woman who dances on her own grave because she hasn’t wasted a moment of her life. Embracing love, loss, joy, and sorrow with equal ferocity, these poems have much to teach us if we take the time to ‘listen’."
—Terri Kirby Erickson, author of A Lake of Light and Clouds

"Sara Claytor was born on the wild side of words. She has taken her life and spun her worlds into clear-eyed amazement on the page. And given it to us wrapped in gold and tied in silver. What joy! What tears! What magic! Nothing worthy has, or ever will, escape Claytor’s bright quickness."
—Ruth Moose, author of Doing It at the Dixie Dew

"Whether writing about lost loved ones, magical childhood places, a bag lady, the various faces of God, or one’s own slow demise, Sara Claytor connects us to other human beings, and gracefully does so. With roads into the past where wounds 'still glimmer…/like broken glass,' some poems are heartbreaking. All journeys are uncertain and Claytor keeps us reading to discover what waits around the bend. This is an engaging book."
—Peter Makuck, author of Long Lens (New & Selected Poems)

Gladys Knows Her Fate

No one cares about an old naked woman on the beach,
her legs, stiff as if spray-starched,
spread like a wishbone.
She eats Roquefort cheese and peaches,
juice lacquering her breasts in luminous blotches.
No one cares that her tits look like melted taffy,
her wisps of pubic hair like prickly grass.
She licks her fingers, flicks a peach pit into the ocean’s edge.

No matter the sun, the glare, the wind
whipping her hair into gray spaghetti strings.
No matter gasps, giggles from passers-by shuffling sand.
Unconcerned. Proud. Expectant.
She waits for her last lover, Neptune,
to rise from the sea,
erase her blotchy-veined skin,
grant her iridescent mermaid fins,
hand her a lobster cell phone
so she can dial God.

A native Tar Heel and former teacher of literature, writing, and speech/drama communications, Sara holds two graduate degrees from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Recipient of numerous poetry prizes, short stories have received first place in Sensations Magazine competition; at the Virginia Highlands Festival, and The Charlotte Writers' Club. Poems and fiction have appeared in over 130 publications including a short story reprinted as one of twelve top stories of the last five years in The Pisgah Review. She has worked as a fiction editor for a small press and as co-editor of the former internet journal The Moonwort Review. Her published books include: Reviving the Damsel Fish, Memory Bones, Carrboro Poetica, and Howling on Red Dirt Roads which was one of two books recognized by the Poetry Council of North Carolina for the year 2008. For the seventh year, she coordinates the North Carolina Poetry Society Reading Series at McIntyre’s Fine Books near Chapel Hill, which brings in poets from across the state for monthly readings.

Night Rumbles by Nancy Janes

Rockrose Press
$12.99, paperback / $1.99, e-book / $17.95, audiobook
ISBN: 978-0-692314074
March, 2015
Fiction: Sci-Fi / Fantasy / Christian
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

"This book is awe-inspiring and a true pleasure to read. It is a wondrous fantasy tale that sent me on a lovely journey. It had an almost a calming feeling within me as I read it."
MagicWanda review 2015

Brad, a being of light, left a paradise to enter a world of tyranny. Why?

On the planet Lydo, in the city of Iru, nineteen-year-old Brad, a research student at the Science Academy, enters Daganland, a Netherworld city, to research its little-known inhabitants. The caveat: he will lose his memory and take on the form of the natives.

Waking up in the town of Nofer in Daganland, Brad enters into a world ruled by a Tyrant. It is a planet of darkness where the inhabitants live and work by night. The majority of the inhabitants are former humans. Brad is assigned to cross over to the human world to observe their habits and behaviors as a part of his future career. Instead of obeying his instructors to be merely an observer he grows fond of the humans, and his studies take a new direction.

Using sharp insight interlaced with dashes of wit and satire, Nancy Janes weaves a twisting tale that creates a candid portrait of humanity and its idiosyncrasies from the vantage point of a pure outsider battling forces he doesn't quite fully grasp.

Nancy Janes (Zelman) is a former clinical social worker who now writes full-time. She has written two books: The Boy Who Walked a Way and and Night Rumbles, loosely based upon upon each other.

Fantasy/Sci-FI, short stories in the Americana vein, and poetry are her interests. Her writings are Christian-based, but the secular reader will find in them the universal themes of human struggles and the search to master life's troubles.

Helloooo Vietnam: 364 Days and a Wake-Up by Colonel Tom Davis

Old Mountain Press
$3.99, e-book
ASIN: B00MSVVIZU
August, 2014
Memoir
Available from www.Amazon.com

This e-book is the second chapter of the Tom Davis' memoir: The Most Fun I Ever Had With My Clothes On: A March from Private to Colonel. In his memoir, the author relates his experiences during the thirty-one years spent in the US Army, rising through the ranks from private to full colonel. Twenty of those years he served with US Army Special Forces (Green Berets).

This book chronicles his time in three combat zones: Vietnam, Bosnia, and Iraq/Turkey. Included are his experiences commanding Special Forces Operational A Detachments which specialized in Underwater Operations, High Altitude Low Opening Parachuting, Mountaineering, and Small Atomic Demolitions Munitions as well as two Special Forces Battalions and a Joint Special Operations Task Force.

Each chapter covers his duties and responsibilities at the Army Installation where he served. Sometimes funny. Sometimes sad. Always interesting.

Col (Ret) Thomas (Tom) Hoyt Davis, III (AKA The Squid), holds a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Georgia and a master's degree from the University of Southern California. Tom entered the Army as a private and retired as a full colonel. He spent twenty of his thirty-plus years in the Army serving with Special Forces (Green Berets) on four continents and in ten foreign countries. He has worn a Green Beret at every rank from 2LT to Colonel and commanded at every level from Special Forces A Teams to a Joint Special Operations Task Force. The various A Teams he commanded specialized in Mountaineering, Underwater Operations, High Altitude Low Opening (HALO) parachute techniques, and Small Atomic Demolitions Munitions (SADM). In addition to the Army's Command and General Staff College and Army War College, he has attended Airborne, Ranger, Special Forces, Underwater Operations (UWO), Danish Combat Swimmer, Special Forces Surface Swimmer Infiltration Technique Course, High Altitude Low Opening (HALO) parachute school, Small Atomic Demolitions Munitions (SADM) and others.

His short stories, articles, and poetry have been published in Poets Forum, The Carolina Runner, Triathlon Today, ByLine, Georgia Athlete, The Saturday Extra (magazine section of the Fayetteville Observer), A Loving Voice Vol. I and II, and Special Warfare (a professional military journal published by the Special Warfare Center). Many of his short stories have received honors in writing contests sponsored by ByLine magazine. Other books by Tom include The Life and Times of Rip Jackson, The Patrol Order, Growing up In Vienna, Georgia, and an action adventure novel, The R-complex. He has recently published his memoir: The Most Fun I Ever Had With My Cloths On: A March from Private to Colonel.

Thinking about the Next Big Bang in the Galaxy at the Edge of Town by Scott Owens

Main Street Rag
$14.00, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-59948-548-5
December, 2015
Poetry
Available from the publisher

"A symphony of musical memory and lyrical philosophies, Thinking About the Next Big Bang in the Galaxy at the Edge of Town triumphs—from 'All the Meaningful Noise' to 'Persona' and on to 'Used,' the last sound-poem. Owens invents possums and God, plus himself at various ages, until the impractical art of love becomes the way to give meaning to the racket of surround, longing 'for the kindness we could do for each other.'"
—Shelby Stephenson, North Carolina Poet Laureate

"In this new book of poems, Scott Owens revisits many of the themes we have come to expect from him, often in the mode of the confessional, endlessly awakening the reader’s senses with a whole gallery of deep images. However, there is more, for this is the furthest Owens has descended into the well of contemplation, and in doing so, he proves here to be a poet that doesn’t just write to document, but one that must write to be alive."
—Tim Peeler, author of Checking Out and Waiting for Charlie Brown

Reclamation

Having seen the transformation of one
rundown furniture plant into expensive
restaurant, brewery, boutique shops
for clothes and frozen yogurt, and noticing
the ongoing cleaning out of another,
and knowing it had already happened with my life,
education and divorce and writing
redeeming what had once been worthless,
I couldn’t help but wonder how much
could be achieved with any body
nearly worn out, teeth straightened
with invisalign, eyes fixed by laser,
gut restored with probiotics,
foot pain eliminated by the Strassburg Sock,

but then even after rejuvenation,
even among the young, it’s not always
pretty, not always full of grace,
the crude, oil-stained nuts and bolts
of life, the unphotogenic face,
a bad day that keeps getting worse,
walls that don’t line up, some bricks
uneven, some not quite the right size,
and that’s what the mortar’s for,
the gray areas of tolerance,
forgiveness, understanding,
empathetic appreciation of things
being left imperfect, only as good
as we can stand to make them be.

Originally from Greenwood, SC, Scott Owens holds degrees from Ohio University, UNC Charlotte, and UNC Greensboro. He currently lives in Hickory, where he teaches at Lenoir Rhyne University, edits Wild Goose Poetry Review, owns and operates Taste Full Beans Coffeehouse and Gallery and coordinates Poetry Hickory. Thinking About the Next Big Bang in the Galaxy at the Edge of Town is his thirteenth collection of poetry. His work has received awards from the Academy of American Poets, the Pushcart Prize Anthology, the Next Generation/Indie Lit Awards, the North Carolina Writers Network, the NC Poetry Society, and the Poetry Society of SC. He has been featured on The Writer’s Almanac four times, and his articles about poetry have been featured in Poet’s Market twice.

The Complete Tryon Diary by Susan McNabb

CreateSpace
$12.99, paperback / $3.99, e-book
ISBN: 978-1512044393
June, 2015
Nonfiction: Humor
Available from www.Amazon.com

Fall in love with Tryon, North Carolina, in this complete collection of Susan McNabb’s insightful and often funny weekly newspaper columns from the Tryon Daily Bulletin as she discovers the unexpected in small-town life after nearly three decades in Hollywood. Included are all 50 columns, capturing a year in the “friendliest town in the South” with thoughts on Tryon native Nina Simone, the Mule Club, rented goats, and trashion shows.

Susan McNabb is the author of The Complete Tryon Diary, a collection of columns from the Tryon Daily Bulletin, "The World's Smallest Daily Newspaper," in which she chronicles her adjustment to small-town life in North Carolina after nearly three decades in Los Angeles. Tryon Diary: Tales from the Friendliest Town in the South is a collection of her 2014 columns.

Susan grew up in Asheville, North Carolina, and received an English Literature degree from the University of Tennessee before moving to L.A. to pursue modeling and commercial acting. Now settled in Tryon with her husband and rescued dogs, Susan is also an accomplished potter and fiber artist. You can visit Susan at www.susanmcnabb.com or on Facebook, Goodreads, or Twitter.

A Love We Deserve (True Love Book 2) by Betsy Anne

CreateSpace
$12.95, paperback / $2,99, e-book
ISBN: 978-1-508732471
March, 2015
Fiction: Romance
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

In this sequel to Mine, Not Hers (Book 1 in the True Love series), we find funny Georgia girl Melanie at her breaking point.

Melanie's husband Chris has come home for the last time smelling of a cheap mistress. She's finally had enough. She kicks him to the curb once and for all, but now what?

Bearing witness to the love her best friend Katie shares with her husband Jason, has opened her eyes to see that she deserves more than what she's settled for. Problem is, where to begin? How does she meet someone when she's so jaded and distrustful of men?

After fumbled attempts with bars, dating websites, and personal trainers, she's had enough. Swearing off men altogether, she throws all of her energy into making her life better, and working for a cause she believes in. When she least expects it, she meets a handsome, muscular stranger whose enraptured by her. Even though she's drawn to him by an intense attraction, she pushes him away, knowing that Mr. Perfect will be next in her line of failed relationships.

Is he strong enough to break down the brick wall she's built around her heart or will he protect his own which hides deep secrets from his past?

A page turner from the beginning, Melanie's sad, funny, steamy, and sweet story will envelope the reader until the very last page.

Betsy Anne is a happily married, hopeless romantic with three children. Her first novel Mine, Not Hers, was completed in April 2014 and published digitally and in paperback on Amazon.com. Betsy Anne holds a BS degree in Sociology from The University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She and her New Jersey-born husband Henry love hanging out with their children and families, traveling, their secondary children (two cats and a dog), and spending time at their beach house in South Carolina. She is currently writing her third novel.

 

The North Carolina Writers’ Network is now accepting submissions for its annual Doris Betts Fiction Prize, administered by the North Carolina Literary Review.

The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards $250 and publication in the NCLR to the author of the winning short story. Up to ten finalists will also be considered for publication. The contest is open to writers with North Carolina connections (who live or have lived in NC), members of the North Carolina Writers’ Network, or subscribers to the NCLR.

Published since 1992 by East Carolina University and the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association, the North Carolina Literary Review has won numerous awards and citations. The Doris Betts Fiction Prize honors beloved writer and teacher Doris Betts (1932-2012), who in the course of her long career won three Sir Walter Raleigh awards, the Southern Book Award, the North Carolina Award for Literature, the John Dos Passos Prize, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters Medal for the short story, among other recognitions. Her Souls Raised from the Dead was on the New York Times’ list of top twenty best books in 1994. Among her many other acclaimed works are The Astronomer and Other Stories, Beasts of the Southern Wild and Other Stories, and The Scarlet Thread. She was inducted into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame in 2004.

Entries to the 2013 contest can be submitted through the NCLR’s online submission process at www.nclr.ecu.edu/submissions/submit-online.html. Full submission guidelines are as follows:

Postmark deadline: February 15 (annual)
Submissions accepted: January 1 – February 15

The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards the first-prize winner $250 and publication in the North Carolina Literary Review. Finalists will also be considered for publication in NCLR.

 

Eligibility and Guidelines

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. North Carolina Literary Review subscribers with North Carolina connections (lives or has lived in NC) are also eligible.
  • The competition is for previously unpublished short stories up to 6,000 words. One entry per writer. No novel excerpts. Stories do NOT have to relate to NCLR’s annual special feature topic.
  • Submit previously unpublished stories online at https://nclr.submittable.com/submit. Submittable will collect your entry fee via credit card ($10 NCWN members or NCLR subscribers / $20 for non-members/non-subscribers).
  • To pay submission fees by check or money order, make payable to the North Carolina Writers Network and mail to: Ed Southern, PO Box 21591, Winston-Salem, NC 27120- 1591
  • Documents must be Microsoft Word or .rtf files. The author’s name should not appear in the story file. Title the file with the story’s title to connect the story with your name. If you have any problems submitting electronically, email NCLR'sThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

The winner and finalists will be announced in April. The winning story and select finalists will be published in the next year’s issue of the North Carolina Literary Review.

Questions may be directed to Gabrielle Brant Freeman, Submission Manager of the North Carolina Literary Review, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Leah Hampton of Waynesville, NC, won the 2012 Doris Betts Fiction Prize for her story, "The Saint." Gregg Cusick, Ronald Jackson, and Kathryn Lovatt received Honorable Mentions.

The non-profit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

North Carolina Literary ReviewThe North Carolina Writers' Network is now accepting submissions for three annual competitions. These contests offer members and non-members the chance to put their work in front of industry professionals around the state--fellow authors, publishers, and editors--and gain recognition that will further their career. But the postmark deadlines are fast approaching, so the time to submit is now.

January 17 marks the deadline for the Rose Post Creative Nonfiction Competition, which encourages the creation of lasting nonfiction work that is outside the realm of conventional journalism and has relevance to North Carolinians. Subjects may include traditional categories such as reviews, travel articles, profiles or interviews, place/history pieces, or culture criticism. The first-, second-, and third-place winners will receive $300, $200, and $100 respectively. The winning entry will be considered for publication by Southern Cultures magazine. Award-winning author Anne Clinard Barnhill will be the final judge.

January 30 is the deadline for the Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize honoring internationally celebrated North Carolina novelist Thomas Wolfe. The winner receives $1,000 and possible publication in The Thomas Wolfe Review. The competition is open to all writers regardless of geographical location or prior publication. Acclaimed author Josephine Humphreys will serve as the final judge.

Josephine HumphreysFinally, the Network is accepting submissions for the Doris Betts Fiction Prize. This competition honors acclaimed author and North Carolina native Doris Betts. The prize awards the first-place winner $250 and publication in the North Carolina Literary Review. Finalists will also be considered for publication in NCLR. The postmark deadline is February 15.

The distinguished judges are a large part of what makes these competitions so prestigious. Anne Clinard Barnhill, who will judge the Rose Post Creative Nonfiction Competition, has signed a two-book deal with St. Martin's Press. Her debut novel, At the Mercy of the Queen, was published in January, 2012. Her poetry chapbook, Coal, Baby, will also appear in early 2012 from Finishing Line Press. She is the author of two books: What You Long For (Main Street Rag, 2009—short-story collection) and At Home in the Land of Oz: Autism, My Sister, and Me (Jessica Kingsley, 2007—memoir). Her articles and short stories have appeared in a variety of newspapers, literary anthologies, and magazines. Her work has won various awards and grants.

Anne Clinard BarnhillJosephine Humphreys, final judge of the Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize, is a recipient of an Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She is the author of Dreams of Sleep (winner of the 1985 Ernest Hemingway Award for first fiction), Rich in Love, The Fireman's Fair, and Nowhere Else on Earth.

The North Carolina Literary Review, which will choose the winner and finalists for the Doris Betts Fiction Prize, is entering its twentieth year of publication and has been called "the state's literary journal of record."

For more information on all three contests, including submission guidelines. visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

North Carolina Literary ReviewNORTH CAROLINA--The North Carolina Writers' Network is still accepting submissions for its 2012 Doris Betts Fiction Prize. This competition honors acclaimed author and North Carolina native Doris Betts, three-time winner of the Sir Walter Raleigh Award and recipient of the North Carolina Award for Literature, among many other honors.

The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards the first-prize winner $250 and publication in the North Carolina Literary Review. Finalists will also be considered for publication in NCLR.

Thomas Wolf of Chapel Hill won the 2011 Doris Betts Fiction Prize for his story "Boundaries." This was Mr. Wolf's second award, having also won in 2007 for his story, "Distance." "Boundaries" will be published in the 2012 issue of NCLR, along with the second-place story, "The Honey Wagon," by Joseph Cavano.

The 2011 competition drew nearly 100 entries. The Doris Betts Fiction Prize is sponsored by the Network and managed by the editorial staff of the North Carolina Literary Review. Published since 1992 by East Carolina University and the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association, NCLR has won numerous awards and citations.

The Doris Betts Fiction Prize
Postmark deadline: February 15 (annual)
Submissions accepted: January 1 – February 15

Eligibility and Guidelines:

 

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of NC or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. NCLR subscribers with NC connections (who live or have lived in NC) are also eligible.
  • The competition is for unpublished short stories up to 6,000 words. One entry per writer. No novel excerpts. No simultaneous submissions.
  • Submit story electronically via the NCLR’s online submission process. For electronic submission instructions and to start the online submission process, go to: www.nclr.ecu.edu/submissions/submit-online.html.
  • Author's name should not appear on the manuscript. Author will register with the NCLR’s online submission system, which will collect contact information and connect it to the author's submission.
  • An entry fee must be mailed to the NCLR office (address below) by the postmark deadline (February 15).
  • You may pay the Network member/ NCLR subscriber entry fee if you join the NCWN or subscribe to the NCLR with your submission: $10 (NCWN members, NCLR subscribers) or $20 (nonmembers/ nonsubscribers--must be a NC resident).
  • Checks should be made payable to the North Carolina Writers’ Network. (Separate checks should be made payable to the North Carolina Literary Review only if purchasing a subscription to the NCLR.)
  • Mail checks or money orders to:

North Carolina Literary Review
ECU Mailstop 555 English
Greenville, NC 27858-4353

  • The winner and finalists will be announced in May.
  • Questions may be directed to the NCLR at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

Hats Off! to Anne Anthony who claimed Third Place in the "Aftermath" Writing Contest from Brilliant Flash Fiction. Read her story "Bathroom Break" here

Hats Off! to Tanya Binford whose book Crossing the Wake: One Woman's Great Loop Adventure is the 2016 winner of the First Full-Length Book Award from Seven Sisters Book Awards. The Seven Sisters Book Awards was started in 2015 by author Lynne Hinton as a way to encourage and celebrate women authors. "Beautifully told, this is a story of one woman's courageous journey," the awards judge says of Crossing the Wake. "Telling her story with clarity and honesty, Binford takes us all on a great adventure inspiring us to do the thing we think we cannot do!"

 

Hats Off! to Sally Stewart Mohney, author of Low Country, High Water (Texas A&M University Press), who was nominated for Georgia Author of the Year in Poetry. Sally's collection won the Texas Review Breakthrough Prize: North Carolina.

 

Hats Off! to Tony Wayne Brown whose short story "A Hand That Won't There" appears in the Winter edition, "Mindscapes and Dreams," of the GNU Journal published by the MFA Program at National University. "A Hand That Won't There" is based on actual events.

 

Hats Off! to Connie Gunter whose essay "Degrees of Poor" was the 2015 Nonfiction Prize Winner in the Literary Contest sponsored by New Southerner. Connie traveled to Louisville, KY, to give a reading. Her essay also was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. "With grace and affection, the author gives us a moving portrait of her parents and the struggles they went through to provide for their family in a small Appalachian town, where every penny counted," said final judge Richard Goodman. "The writing is lyrical and honest, and the story carries with it a deep resonance, because, even with the profound admiration the writer has for her parents, she does not avert her eyes to the internal conflicts those difficult and humiliating circumstances created."

 

Hats Off! to Joan Leotta whose article on "Setting a Path for the New Year" appears in Ruby for Women magazine. Also, poems of hers have been accepted by Wild World, Indiana Voice Journal, and Poetry and Prose.

 

Hats Off! to Maren O. Mitchell whose poem "Camouflage Addict" appears in the current issue of Pedestal Magazine. Also, The Lake, based in England, has published two of her letter poems, "B, Unabashedly Buxom," and "J, Descended from I," in their January issue.

 

Hats Off! to Emmanuel Kane who contributed to the blog post "Why Does Poetry Matter?" on the Poetry Matters Project, Ltd. "Poetry matters because it captures remotest feelings and thoughts," Kane says. "It takes the mind and soul to a place where others fear to tread. Poetry allows us to be ourselves, to speak our mind, to laugh the healthiest laugh and cry the deepest cry. Poetry reveals who we are and how we want our space, our world, to be or become. As God’s creation, we speak and think and act poetically. Therefore we are poetry and poetry matters.” Kane is the author of Theaters of War (2006) and Growing Flames, Fury and Lavender (PRA Publishing, forthcoming).

 

Poet and editor Dan Albergotti, the winner of the 2005 Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition, will judge this year’s Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition.

Submissions for this year’s Jarrell contest are now open, until the March 1 postmark deadline.

A graduate of the MFA program at UNC Greensboro and former poetry editor of The Greensboro Review, Albergotti currently teaches creative writing and literature courses and edits the online journal Waccamaw (www.waccamawjournal.com) at Coastal Carolina University in Conway, South Carolina.  He is the author of The Boatloads (BOA Editions, 2008), selected by Edward Hirsch as the winner of the 2007 A. Poulin, Jr. Poetry Prize.  His poems have appeared in The Cincinnati Review, Shenandoah, The Southern Review, The Virginia Quarterly Review, and Pushcart Prize XXXIII: Best of the Small Presses.

The Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition honors the work and legacy of the poet and critic Randall Jarrell, who taught at what is now the University of North Carolina at Greensboro for nearly eighteen years.

The contest accepts one-poem submissions.  The winner receives $200, publication in The Crucible literary journal, and an invitation to read his or her poetry at UNC Greensboro’s Founders Day activities.

The competition is administered by Terry L. Kennedy and the graduate program in creative writing at UNCG, and is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network.  Questions may be directed to Kennedy at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  Full guidelines are below.

Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition
Postmark deadline: March 1 (annual)

Eligibility and Guidelines

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the NC Writers’ Network.
  • Submissions should be one poem only (40-line limit).
  • Poem must be typed (single-spaced) and stapled in the left-hand corner.
  • Names should not appear on the poem but on a separate cover sheet along with address, phone number, and poem title.
  • Poem will not be returned. Include a self-addressed stamped envelope for a list of winners.
  • An entry fee must accompany the poem. Multiple submissions are accepted, one poem per entry fee: $10 for NCWN members, $15 for nonmembers. You may pay member entry fee if you join the NCWN with your submission. Checks should be made payable to the North Carolina Writers’ Network.

The winner will be announced in May.

Send submissions, indicating name of competition, to:
Terry Kennedy
MFA Writing Program
3302 MHRA Building
UNC Greensboro
Greensboro, NC 27402-6170

Checks should be made payableto the North Carolina Writers’ Network.

The North Carolina Writers’ Network is now accepting submissions for its annual Doris Betts Fiction Prize, administered by the North Carolina Literary Review.

The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards $250 and publication in the NCLR to the author of the winning short story, up to 6,000 words.  The contest is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina, a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network, or a subscriber to the NCLR.

Robert Wallace of Durham won the 2010 Betts prize for his story “As Breaks the Wave Upon the Sea.”

Entries to the 2011 contest can be submitted through the NCLR’s online submission process at www.nclr.ecu.edu/submissions/submit-online.html.  Full submission guidelines, including entry fees, are listed below.

Doris Betts Fiction Prize
Postmark Deadline: February 15 (annual)
Submissions Accepted from January 1 – February 15

The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards the first-prize winner $250 and publication in the North Carolina Literary Review. Finalists will also be considered for publication in the NCLR.

Eligibility and Guidelines

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. North Carolina Literary Review subscribers with North Carolina connections (lives or has lived in NC) are also eligible.
  • The competition is for short stories up to 6,000 words. One entry per writer. No novel excerpts.
  • Submit story electronically via the NCLR’s online submission process. For electronic submission instructions and to start the online submission process, go to: www.nclr.ecu.edu/submissions/submit-online.html.
  • Names should not appear in the Word file of the story; authors will register with the NCLR’s online submission system, which will collect contact information and connect it to story submission.
  • An entry fee must be mailed to the NCLR office (address below) by the postmark deadline (February 15 each year).
  • You may pay the Network member/NCLR subscriber entry fee if you join NCWN or subscribe to the NCLR with your submission:

$10/NCWN members and/or NCLR subscribers
$20/nonmembers (must be a North Carolina resident)

  • Checks for submission fee and/or Network membership should be made PAYABLE TO the North Carolina Writers’ Network (separate checks payable to the NCLR only if purchasing a subscription).
  • Mail checks or money orders to:

North Carolina Literary Review
ECU Mailstop 555 English
Greenville, NC 27858-4353

The winner and finalists will be announced in May. Winning story and select finalists will be published in the next year’s issue of the North Carolina Literary Review.

Questions may be directed to the North Carolina Literary Review, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keepsakes by Shawndra Russell

Shawndra Russell Communications
$4.99, e-book
ASIN: B00QPQIO3S
February, 2015
Fiction: Women's
Available for pre-order from www.Amazon.com and from the publisher

Chapter 1

“You’re moving to ITALY? And you want a DIVORCE?”
“Yes,” she said quietly.
“What about ‘til death do us part?” he yelled. “Didn’t that mean anything to you?”
“Of course it did. But this means more.”
“How can it mean more than us?”
“Because it does.”
“I don’t understand Bridgette. When did this happen?”
“I applied for this artist’s residency on a whim about six months ago and was notified I’d won a spot a couple months after that.”
“So you’ve known for four months and didn’t tell me?”
“I’m sorry, Gabe. I thought this would be easier.”
At that moment, he heard a car horn. What else could he say? She had her bags packed, her one-way flight booked, and her mind set. She was going to Italy to look at masterpieces, paint masterpieces, be surrounded by greatness. Apparently, she didn’t think Gabe was all that great anymore. Apparently, she thought he was holding her back from her true potential. Apparently, she was a cold, heartless bitch.

Keepsakes begins with a divorce bomb when Bridgette tells Gabe she's leaving him and moving to Italy moments before her cab pulls up to whisk her away. In the aftermath, Gabe and his group of friends living in Charleston, South Carolina, navigate through the pain and confusion together. Gabe turns to the keepsakes of he and Bridgette's relationship to remember the good times and figure out what's next. Should he fight for his marriage, or begin the next chapter of his life?

Shawndra Russell is an author, digital marketer, and freelance writer who has contributed to Forbes Travel Guide, Society South, Travel+Leisure, BeerAdvocate, Media Bistro, Snooth, and Business in Savannah, among others. Her novels include Couple Friends and Keepsakes, and she has published three social media resources titled 51 Ways to Help Your Social Media Manager Crush It!, Start Today: DIY Social Media for Small Businesses, and Start Today: Social Employee Advocacy Program.

Russell splits time between her adopted cities of Asheville, North Carolina, and Savannah, Georgia, and lives with her husband and first-look editor Gary and their Boston terrier, Massy. Her free time is spent trying craft beers, traveling whenever possible (so far hitting China, most of Europe, Canada, Mexico, Dominican Republic, and thirty of the states including Hawaii and Alaska), and of course, reading some of her favorite authors like Nora Ephron, Emily Giffin, Veronica Roth, and Candace Bushnell.

“I like to explore milestones in people’s lives with my fiction,” Russell explains. “Love, friendship, divorce, careers, death...these are the topics that affect us all, and through my novels I aim to take readers through the ups and downs of life.”

She loves Twitter and sharing her favorite quotes from books mid-read at @ShawndraRussell. You can read some of her other published work and blog at www.shawndrarussell.com.

She's also an alum of Ashland University where she played college volleyball and earned her BA in English before heading on to become a Thundering Herd at Marshall University, earning her MA as the Graduate Assistant Coach for the volleyball team.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Spy Doc by Catherine Yee

Whiskey Creek Press
$3.99, e-book
September, 2014
Fiction: Thriller
Avaialble from www.Amazon.com

This is a different kind of spy story about men and women who seek to understand what makes the varied assortment of world leaders and other world notables, both good and evil, tick. They gather and assess information gleaned from endless hours of research and file gathering, to put together a profile that will provide our government the tools needed to deal with these people and their governments.

Buried in the bowels of one of the several intelligence agencies in the US government is an office of clandestine medical personnel. Their mission is to analyze the health and mental state of international persons of interest and report their findings to America’s policymakers. The team is on call 24/7 to comment on and analyze any written observations, pictures or videos of such persons of interest that may come into the hands of the U.S. government. The goal is to provide timely information to policymakers and negotiators so that the United States of America may achieve maximum success in dealing with the people concerned. Usually this is done in the safe confines of the Agency walls, but sometimes the analysts are forced to place themselves in harms way. Through it all and despite the circumstances, their Code of Honor is to Do No Harm.

Catherine Yee is an Air Force, Vietnam-era veteran assigned to the Strategic Air Command Headquarters, 8th Air Force, at Westover AFB, Massachussets, in 1960. After her husband's discharge from the Air Force, they moved to his hometown of Shreveport, Louisianna. A few years following, she went to work for AT&T's telephone manufacturing plant in Shreveport where she worked for twenty-one years. In the late 1980s her husband took a promotion with Gannett News Service and they moved to Northern Virginia. There, Yee worked for a mortgage bank. Following that, she worked for the Central Intelligence Agency where sje remained for sixteen years until her retirement in 2005.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erasing the Doubt by Mary Kendall

Finishing Line Press
$14.49, paperback
February, 2015
Poetry
Available from the publisher

“Mary Kendall’s Erasing the Doubt is captivating from start to finish. Moments of nostalgia, memory, and wisdom rise and stir the heart with each turn of the page. The reader is summoned not only to know the author but themselves through these thoughtfully honed poems. Each page reveals the poet’s understanding of her world and her reflections on life. Kendall’s work aches with longing, beauty and power. She has cleverly entwined classic literature, the Greeks, and Russian modernists with the enduring beauty of prose and a dash of contemporary style, to give us a unique and personal work well worth reading."
— Kelle Grace Gaddis, MFA, author of Polishing a Gem on the Surface of the Sea and editor, Brightly Press

Erasing the Doubt is Mary Kendall's first chapbook. Often described as a lyrical or meditative poet, Kendall has presented a selection of poems that offer an introspective examination of human interactions in actions and words.

The beautiful cover photograph, "Schwerelos (Weightless)," is by talented Dresden, Germany, photographer Christine Ellger, and used with her very generous permission.

Mary Kendall is a poet and a retired reading teacher who lives with her husband in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Mary has a B.A. degree in English and a M.Ed. degree in Reading and Language. She worked as a reading specialist/teacher for thirty-four years. During her many years of teaching, one of her most favorite activities was writing poetry with children.

Over the years, Mary has sporadically published poems in print and online poetry journals. In 2005, she was the grand prizewinner in a writing competition sponsored by the publication, Carolina Woman. She is also the co-author of A Giving Garden (© 2007), a children’s book based on one of her poems.

Mary formally studied poetry writing in the early 1970s with poet Ruth Whitman in Cambridge, MA, and many years later, in 2004, had the fortune to take a writing workshop with poet Jane Hirshfield at the Aspen Summer Words writing program.

Mary has a poetry writing practice blog called A Poet in Time. Contact information: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Running Music by Crystal Simone Smith

Longleaf Press
$10.00, paperback
ISBN: 978-0-9829290-9-4
December, 2014
Poetry
Available from the author

"I suppose it is not too unusual for a person to have family responsibilities, a job, and a vocation, and for that person to find it hard to keep things ongoing and mostly under control. Running Music addresses this subject with candor, sometimes rueful humor, and always with a determined attitude, 'game face,' they say these days."
—Fred Chappell, North Carolina Poet Laureate, 1997-2002

"Running Music is a necklace of tales interloping rich narratives from beginning to end…endless in surprises. Crystal Simone Smith captures the miracles and horrors; the sublime found in the mundane; the haunting awareness of entanglement. These are poems shot straight from the heart… intentionally hitting or missing, sometimes both. Running Music sings with solidarity for the children, for the relentless love of life and living…a tribute and offering to the breath of the running spirit."
—Jaki Shelton Green, 2014 inductee, NC Literary Hall of Fame

"The speaker in Crystal Simone Smith's collection of poems, Running Music, stays keenly observant while wrapped up in life's daily routine. She is both world-weary and hopeful, engaged and curiously amused. Here she is—coming upon a field of buttercups in the rain, poised in a pack of runners at the start of a race, nursing her son through a long night. Time and again in these sane poems, she lays out her experience, and her insights, with the resolve of an expert craftsman. In poem after poem, Smith boldly embraces the challenges life hands her, then she calmly sets them down and run swiftly into the night."
—Sebastian Matthews, author of We Generous and Miracle Day

Crystal Simone Smith was raised in Prince George’s County, Maryland, and educated in North Carolina at Bennett College, UNC-Greensboro, and Queens University of Charlotte. She is the author of Routes Home (Finishing Line Press). Her work has appeared in numerous journals including: Callaloo, Nimrod, Barrow Street, Obsidian II: Literature in the African Diaspora, African American Review, and Mobius: The Journal of Social Change. She is an alumnus of the Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop and the Yale Summer Writers Conference. She holds an MFA from Queens University of Charlotte and lives in Durham, NC, with her husband and two sons where she teaches English Composition II and Creative Writing. She is currently the Managing Editor of Backbone Press. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Place Where I Left You by Sandra Ann Winters

Salmon Poetry
$21.00, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-908836-93-9
November, 2014
Poetry
Available from the publisher or www.Amazon.com

“Sandra Ann Winters’ poems are refreshingly direct, heroic in their address of the issues at the heart of the human condition. A natural empathy for the ‘individual journey’ is leavened by a superb mastery of her chosen craft, what Joyce calls ‘a scrupulous meanness.’ Her experience of growing up in rural North Carolina along with her extensive travels in Ireland bring a unique dimension to a poetry that transcends geographic and socio-cultural divides. How she unpeels the masks that would distract us from an assessment of our true Selves is quite unique in modern poetry. A most welcome and timely addition to the canon of Irish poetry.”
—Eugene O’Connell, Editor, Cork Literary Review

“In The Place Where I Left You, Sandra Ann Winters has given us poems that disturb our comforting myths of family, place, and self—themes the book’s divisions announce—as well as poems that testify to quotidian heroism in simple acts of persevering: the will to plant, to wash greens, mow hay, paint rooms, to ‘hang on.’ Whether in impoverished, rural North Carolina, or the high haunts of Yeats and Lady Gregory, these thematic loci are the universal landscape out of which all human individuation emerges and, sometimes, transcends.

"Winters’ poems are word paintings, and, like the impressionist masters the poet emulates, her carefully wrought pictures establish life, but from a distance. The distance, as in ‘The Kitchen,’ separating the poet’s strategic act of copying Monet’s mustard-colored walls from the inanity of picking ‘yellow nits’ from her son’s hair; or the distance in time, the decade elapsed between the planting and abandonment of an unsuccessful wisteria vine that suddenly bursts into an ‘explosion' of lavender.’ A distance traveled, survived, through all the ways we humans fail and, sometimes, save each other, or ourselves. Winters’ palette is expunged of the rosy; her touch, hot, in pursuit of the ‘mot juste.’

"The editor of Ireland’s Cork Literary Review, Eugene O’Connell, calls Winters’ collection a ‘welcome and timely addition to the canon of Irish poetry.’ The same might be said for American letters.”
—Janet Joyner

"Sandra Ann Winters’ poems 'range from earth to stars and cut to the quick.' The impulse to confront loss with unflinching honesty is finely balanced by the impulse toward joy and dazzlement—by language, by color, by wild creatures, by sustaining relationships with others. . . These are wise poems. Whatever the loss, new life waits. Wisteria dormant for a decade blooms again. The spirit endures and ‘we all hang on’ (‘The Wisteria Blooms’).”
—Becky Gould Gibson, author of Need-Fire, writes on Calving Under the Moon

“Sandra Ann Winters takes us ‘one foot and two inches / above [our] line of vision’ in poems reminding us to expand our own focus and be wary of what we usually overlook in the process of living our daily lives. From planting wisteria to taking a shower, looking for a dog or laying out a corpse, her words startle us with tender insights and graceful expression.”
—Terri Strug, author of Musical Progression in the Poetry of Randall Jarrell, writes on Calving Under the Moon

Sandra Ann Winters was winner of the 2011 Gregory O’Donoghue International Poetry Competition with her poem “Death of Alaska.” The editors of the North Carolina Literary Review nominated “Water Signs” for the 2011 Pushcart Prize. Her poems have been published in the Cork Literary Review, Southword Journal, the North Carolina Literary Review, the Wisconsin Review, and others. She is author of a previous poetry chapbook, Calving Under the Moon (Finishing Line Press, 2013).

The Place Where I Left You will be formally launched in Ireland at the Cork Spring Poetry Festival February 12, 2015, and in the U.S. at the Association of Writers and Writing Programs (AWP) conference in Minneapolis, MN, April 9-11, 2015. In approximately June, 2015, Dufour Editions (and Amazon.com) will distribute her book in the US.

Visit Sandra’s new website at sandraannwinters.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Second-Greatest Baseball Game Ever Played by Drew Bridges

iUniverse
$24.95, hardcover / $14.95, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-491747797
October, 2014
Memoir
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

A soldier coming home to build a life beyond war is one of the oldest stories ever told. From Homer's Odysseus to today's wounded warrior, there are millions of such stories. They are all unique and they all share common features. The Second-Greatest Baseball Game Ever Played is one of those stories, told in part from an American GI's World War II letters to his pregnant wife, in part through the author's memories and reflections about his solder-father, and in part through an afternoon of baseball played by ten to fifteen-year olds in western North Carolina in 1957.

The Brooklyn Dodgers defeated the New York Yankees in the seventh game of the 1955 World Series in the greatest baseball game ever played. The second-greatest baseball game ever played took place Saturday, June 29, 1957. No Yankees, Giants, Dodgers, Cardinals, or Red Sox were there. The game played out in author Drew Bridges’s hometown of Hildebran in western North Carolina. Two teams of boys, ten to fifteen years old, faced off on the high school baseball diamond, no uniforms and no organized league. Bridges played second base, his brother played third, and their dad coached the team.

In this memoir, Bridges tells the story of that afternoon of baseball and how it came to be through his recollections and his father’s wartime letters to his mother who was pregnant with their first child. It shares the words of an ordinary American serviceman who is dreaming about a life beyond war.

Field of Dreams meets A League of Their Own meets The Sandlot in this story of a soldier’s return home from World War II and his work with others in the community to build a youth league baseball program. The Second-Greatest Baseball Game Ever Played shares the game of baseball through the eyes of a ten-year-old and shows how this game captured the heart and soul of a community and became so vital to all.

Kirkus Reviews calls the author an "entertaining writer" who presents "intriguing characters." Signed copies are available at The Storytellers Book Store in the town of Wake Forest, NC.

Drew Bridges is a (mostly) retired psychiatrist who has reclaimed his undergraduate English major identity by opening The Storytellers Book Store of Wake Forest. He lives in Wake Forest with his wife Lauren who co-owns the bookstore. He is a graduate of Gardner-Webb Jr. College, Lenoir Rhyne College, and the Medical School of UNC, Chapel Hill. He has a previous novel, Family Lost and Found, and a book about storytelling.

The heart of the North Carolina Writers’ Network beats in response to the needs and requests of its members. Its members are the poets, novelists, essayists, writers of short stories, flash fiction, nonfiction, novellas—all the vibrantly talented wordsmiths we have, who live and work across our state, from the western tip of our Blue Ridge Mountains to the wide, sandy beaches of our eastern shores.

What does the NCWN mean to me, personally? Let me set the scene …

Timing is just about everything. Well, it certainly was on the day I received the worst critique of my life. I’m sure you know the type: learned author reads your sentences aloud. Shakes his head, disgusted. Your BP ramps up like you’ve just run the mile. You wait for his feedback and pray it won’t slice you to red-ribbon shreds. It shoots out like poison arrows from his lips: “I don’t know, Jan. Maybe you should think about going back to school.” (Insert shower scene from Psycho here; he is killing you.)

Time moved at glacial speeds for me after that day. I did not write for six months. My bruised heart thumped erratically. I cried at the oddest intervals, and I was making my spouse sick. One day, the Hubs said, “Dear, you have got to do something different.”

Of course, I gave him the stink eye because his timing seemed to suck. In truth though, it was perfect. Online, I input my membership data to the NCWN’s user-friendly Web site and rediscovered such delicious entrees as their guide to literary agents, calendar of upcoming events, Hats Off, resource links, and writing competitions. In the dessert section, Submit It, I read the call for submissions by a well-known publisher in Winston-Salem.

The deadline for their Open Awards was a few months off, so I decided to enter. What’d I have to loose? Soon, my computer and I were back on track. I wrote every day for the next six months and submitted everything I’d written to Press 53. One of my pieces earned a spot on the finalist list (2008), and I floated to cloud nine and back. I felt a whole lot smarter about the timing of things, not to mention, clearer on the fundamental definition of who my community needed to be. By the way, my novella, Hard Times and Happenstance, won first place honors in the 2009 Press 53 Open Awards Anthology and will be published this fall.

So, what does the NCWN mean to me personally? It is where my tender fellow writers and poets—the ones who speak in special tongues, the ones who shape-shift the world into a place we can actually bear (or stop putting up with) come together—online or at a conference, at a reading or via phone. It is where we can be counted and a place we can feel at home. The North Carolina Writers’ Network is my community. Together, we make the best of good times better.

So, dear, if you’re not a member already, do something different today. Join. You’ll thank yourself tomorrow for the good timing you had today. See you, Jan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiddledeedee by Shelby Stephenson

Press 53
$14.95, paperback
ISBN 978-1-941209-17-2
January, 2015
Poetry
Available from your local bookstore or the publisher

"Shelby Stephenson can walk out his back door—even in his sleep, it seems, so tithed to the land is his subconscious—and see what lies hidden before our very eyes: in the roods and plowsoles, the tree bark and creek beds, in his beloved spectre ancestors forever singing in his head. He writes about the mystery of the dirt—what it yields, what it reclaims—with more precision and prescience than any poet I can think of. I can hear him now, whispering his sacramental litany, his invocation: 'it is nothing but a song—the long journey home.' Fiddledeedee is Shelby at his best. Blessed be his wholly liturgical verse—the bard, the very voice, of North Carolina."
—Joseph Bathanti, former Poet Laureate of North Carolina

"I am very moved by Fiddledeedee, by the accumulating strength of its forward movement as well as by telling details, of the natural and spiritual world."
—A.R. Ammons, winner of the 1973 and 1993 National Book Award for Poetry

“'What can we do but sing?' Shelby Stephenson writes in Fiddledeedee. In this long poem, he has enriched and deepened the themes of previous books, among them, Middle Creek Poems, The Persimmon Tree Canal, and Poor People. We often have poems of memory that are rooted in the poet’s rural upbringing in North Carolina, rustic, elegiac, comic, grim. In Fiddledeedee, memories or homage are not an end in themselves. The poet continually seeks to connect who he was with who he is—exploratory riffs that can surprise his understanding—and therefore ours. The result is a compelling poem of meditative complexity that at the same time is poignant, lyrical, and philosophical."
—Merrill Leffler, author of Mark the Music

“'Where is the word that holds ALL I am trying to say?' asks Shelby Stephenson in the Prologue to Fiddledeedee. He unleashes a poetic answer that plays and keens, singing its long journey home, immersing us in the living language of a place, the East Carolina flatlands. With three-line stanzas, often breathtaking, Stephenson leads us through the lay of his ancestral land. He gives voice to his place and its people and does so unashamedly, with passion and precision, and, yes, with real country music."
—Kathryn Stripling Byer, former Poet Laureate of North Carolina

Shelby Stephenson lives on the small farm where he was born near Benson, in the Coastal Plain of North Carolina. “Most of my poems come out of that background,” he says, “where memory and imagination play on one another.” Educated at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, University of Pittsburgh, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, he is professor emeritus at the University of North Carolina-Pembroke, and served as editor of the international literary journal Pembroke Magazine from 1979 until his retirement in 2010. His awards include the Zoe Kincaid Brockman Memorial Award, North Carolina Network Chapbook Prize, Bright Hill Press Chapbook Award, and the Brockman-Campbell Poetry Prize. He has published a poetic documentary Plankhouse (with photographs by Roger Manley), plus ten chapbooks, most recently Steal Away (Jacar Press). Family Matters: Homage to July, the Slave Girl won the 2008 Bellday Poetry Prize and the 2009 Oscar Arnold Young Award. The state of North Carolina presented Shelby with the 2001 North Carolina Award in Literature, and in 2014 he was inducted into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame. He will be installed as North Carolina's eighth poet laureate this year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To by Scott Owens

Main Street Rag
$15, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-59948-505-8
November, 2014
Poetry
Available from the publisher

"In To, Scott Owens illustrates the joy, frustration, and oxymoronic nature of writing poetry. Only someone who is deeply committed to and believes in the art and craft of poetry could compile such a compelling collection of ars poetica. In fact, the titles alone compel: "The Sun Was Like an Oxymoron," "Arse Poetica," "On the Recent Reports of the Death of Poetry," and so on. This is poetry for the smart reader, the common reader, the reader who's not sure if poetry is his or her thing but is willing to give it a shot. In To, Owens promises to sway all comers. Once I started reading this collection, I couldn't put it down until the very end."
—Robert Lee Brewer, author of Solving the World's Problems and editor of Poet's Market

"Scott Owens' To is a masterful collection of poems on the subject of poetry, such that poetry as a genre acts as the singular ordering device for this most fascinating and valuable contribution to our understandings of the genre. Owens' poems are replete with insight, humor, wisdom, compassion, irony, honesty, and an unassailable knowledge; Owens is both an experienced and very talented poet, both sides everywhere on display throughout To. Buy this book, read it, and let anyone borrow it; each reader will enjoy, learn, profit, and grow––poetry fan or not, whether twenty or four times twenty."
—Ronald Moran

"Poetry, Scott Owens assures us, owes nothing to anyone. This claim is well substantiated by the poems in To, where Owens uses such classic elements as line and stanza, image and rhyme to heighten language in ways that can’t be ignored or denied. Given even half a chance, these poems will carry their readers from whimsy to grief, from despair to delight. They will take readers forward and take them back, from the simple human need to be about to the business of making words do what they must, and thus, in making art, to mean."
—Phebe Davidson

Scott Owens is originally from Greenwood, SC. He holds degrees from Ohio University, UNC Charlotte, and UNC Greensboro and currently lives in Hickory, NC, where he teaches at Catawba Valley Community College, edits Wild Goose Poetry Review and 234, writes for the Outlook Newspaper, and serves as vice-president of the NC Poetry Society. His previous ten books have received awards from the Academy of American Poets, the Pushcart Prize Anthology, the Next Generation/Indie Lit Awards, the North Carolina Writers' Network, the NC Poetry Society, and the Poetry Society of SC.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Narratives: Evolution by Vince Guaglione

Create Space Independent Publishing Platform
$6.95, paperback / $0.99, e-book
ISBN: 978-1500260842
June, 2014
Personal growth, Personal transformation, Philosophy/Consciousness and Thought
Available from www.Amazon.com

The Narratives is a collection of short introspective essays written by an average guy in an effort to better understand himself, his life, and his relationship with the world around him while traveling the road of self-discovery. This series can best be described as the author's unique brand of journaling, encompassing both self-reflective entries, and an expression of thought and opinion surrounding social issues of the present day.

The Narratives: Evolution documents a new chapter in the author's personal growth, following a period of instability, grief, and mourning brought on by the death of a loved one. Each short journal-style essay presented in this work touches on the author's search for substance, depth, and purpose, and is written with full transparency, providing the reader with a unique window into the author's soul.

The Narratives: Evolution, is the fourth volume in The Narratives series.

Vince Guaglione is a guy who asks lots of questions, not only of himself but of his society and the world around him. Although he claims he's found no real answers, that hasn't stopped him in his quest to gain perspective on a little something we call life. When he's not at his real job, you can find him sucking down venti-sized coffees at a brisk pace his local Starbucks, thinking up new writing projects, or pondering his mystery questions of life. Originally from Philadelphia PA, Vince now resides in Raleigh NC.

While working on working his Narratives series, Vince pulled together some ideas from his youth and crafted two stories, classified in the short fictional realm, titled "Chasing Angels" and "Eva."

 

"Writing the New South is a brilliant, exciting, and NECESSARY project---sign me up, count me in! The 'New South' is a cauldron of change, a fertile field of art, a proving ground  for new possibilities.  I can't wait to see what everyone has to say, and in what genres. This is a real opportunity for us all to deepen our understanding of where we live, who we are, and what we believe in."

--Lee Smith

 

Like it or not, North Carolinians are living in momentous times.

The state is home to two of the world’s largest military bases, as wars continue in Iraq and Afghanistan. The state was home to two of the nation’s largest banks, until one was sold to keep it from collapsing. The state once known as a bulwark for Republican presidential candidates voted Democratic in a record-setting election.

A state long known for explosive growth is in danger of losing jobs and population. A state long Red turned Blue, and elected its first female governor.

While no one can predict what will happen, every North Carolinian can and should record what has happened, and how it felt as it happened – especially North Carolina’s writers. It has been said that one cannot spit in North Carolina without hitting a writer. Here is an opportunity for all those writers to do something for the people of this state, something that can provide understanding and perhaps even comfort during these tumultuous times.

With the coming of the New Year, the North Carolina Writers’ Network will launch a program called “Writing the New South,” offering its members a platform to record and share their experiences and interpretations of living in North Carolina as North Carolina changes dramatically.

“Whether they do so through essays, short stories, poetry, or even letters or journals, we want our members to grapple with what’s going on in the state and in the world,” Ed Southern, executive director of the North Carolina Writers’ Network, said. “We are North Carolina writers living in a historic moment for North Carolina. We need to be writing about what’s happening around us, to us, to our families and friends and neighbors.”

The Network has created a special section on its website – http://www.ncwriters.org/features/writing-the-new-south - for submissions to Writing the New South. Network members can upload their poems, stories, essays, or other submissions. Each submission will be reviewed by qualified editors, and the best of the submissions will be displayed online. The Network is also in discussions to have the submissions compiled and published in book form.

“We’re looking for submissions, in whatever genre, that will approach the world around us with imagination, depth, and responsibility,” Southern said.

The first Writing the New South work, by award-winning novelist (and Network member) Lee Smith, is a “postcard” from Hillsborough, where Smith lives.

“Writing the New South is a brilliant, exciting, and necessary project … The ‘New South’ is a  cauldron of change, a fertile field of art, a proving ground  for new possibilities,” Smith said. “I can’t wait to see what everyone has to say, and in what genres. This is a real opportunity for us all to deepen our understanding of where we live, who we are, and what we believe in.”

Southern said, “In the tradition of the New Deal-era WPA Writers’ Project, the goal of Writing the New South is to show the essential and public value of our writers, while creating a record of, and a frame for understanding, our times.”


 

 “Writing the New South” Submission Guidelines

 

-       Authors must be current members of the North Carolina Writers’ Network.

-       Submissions must be no longer than 5,000 words.

-       Submissions may be in any genre: fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, drama, journalism, etc.

-       Submissions must deal with one (or both) of two themes:

1.       Current or recent events of historical significance (for example: gas shortage of fall 2008, 2008 election, 2008 financial crisis, wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, etc.) as they relate to life in present-day North Carolina;

2.      Snapshots of life in a particular city or region of North Carolina, in 500 words or less.

-       Submissions do not have to be objective; however, submissions may not proselytize or attempt to convert readers to any particular viewpoint, political affiliation, or religion.

-       Submissions must be original and unpublished.

-       The Network reserves the right to reject any submission.

-       Accepted submissions will be considered for publication in a possible anthology.  By submitting their work to Writing the New South, authors agree to execute whatever steps are necessary in the event that their work is selected for such an anthology.

 

 

 

About the North Carolina Writers’ Network

 

Founded in 1985, the nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is one of the largest statewide literary arts organization in the country. The mission of the North Carolina Writers’ Network is to connect, promote, and lead emerging writers and established writers through workshops, conferences, and other programs and services. The Network builds audiences for literature, advocates for the literary arts and for literacy, and provides information and support services for writers of all kinds and at all levels.

Talking at the Table: Food Writing in the New SouthProminent southern food writers, cookbook authors and culinary instructors will gather to share favorite stories and insights into food traditions of the South February 15 in Chapel Hill. The public is invited.

The North Carolina Writers’ Network is sponsoring the event, which will also include live bluegrass music and southern dishes.

Tickets are $50, with proceeds going to support the work of the Writers’ Network. Register here.

The panel discussion will be held from 5 p.m. until 7 p.m. at the Horace Williams House at 610 Rosemary St. in Chapel Hill. Speakers will include:

  • John Shelton Reed and Dale Volberg Reed, authors of Holy Smoke: The Big Book of North Carolina Barbecue.
  • Bill Smith, head chef at Crook’s Corner restaurant in Chapel Hill and author of Seasoned in the South.
  • Debbie Moose, former News & Observer food editor and author of Wings: More Than 50 High-Flying Recipes for America’s Favorite Snack.
  • Marcie Cohen Ferris, author of Matzoh Ball Gumbo: Culinary Tales of the Jewish South.
  • Sheri Castle, culinary instructor and contributor to Cornbread Nation 3.

The panel will be moderated by diet and health columnist Suzanne Havala Hobbs.

The authors will be available to sign books sold at the event.

Tickets are available at Market Street Books in Southern Village, Chapel Hill; by calling (919) 251-9140; or by visiting the North Carolina Writers’ Network online at http://www.ncwriters.org/.

Discounted annual membership rates are available at the event to first-time NCWN members for $55, or $20 off the regular rate.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is our state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development.

For additional information, visit http://www.ncwriters.org/.

GREENVILLE—The 2017 Doris Betts Fiction Prize is now open for submissions. The Doris Betts Fiction Prize awards the first-place winner $250 and publication in the North Carolina Literary Review. Finalists will also be considered for publication in NCLR.

The competition is for previously unpublished short stories up to 6,000 words. The Doris Betts Fiction Prize is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. North Carolina Literary Review subscribers with North Carolina connections (lives or has lived in NC) are also eligible.

The deadline is Wednesday, February 15; submit here.

The final judge is NCLR fiction editor Liza Wieland. She the author of seven books and three collections of short fiction, including, most recently the novel Land of Enchantment. She has won two Pushcart Prizes, the Michigan Literary Fiction Prize, a Bridport Prize in the UK, and fellowships from The National Endowment for the Arts, The North Carolina Arts Council, and the Christopher Isherwood Foundation. She has recently been awarded a second fellowship from the North Carolina Arts Council. Her newest novel is Land of Enchantment.

For over twenty years, East Carolina University and the North Carolina Literary & Historical Association have published the North Carolina Literary Review, a journal devoted to showcasing the Tar Heel State’s literary excellence. Described by one critic as “everything you ever wanted out of a literary publication but never dared to demand,” the NCLR has won numerous awards and citations.

Doris Betts was the author of three short story collections and six novels. She won three Sir Walter Raleigh awards, the Southern Book Award, the North Carolina Award for Literature, the John Dos Passos Prize, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters Medal for the short story, among others. Beloved by her students, she was named the University of North Carolina Alumni Distinguished Professor of English in 1980. She was a 2004 inductee of the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame.

Anita Collins of Chapel Hill won the 2016 Doris Betts Fiction Prize for her story "The Anderson Kid," in which a diver works to find the body of a drowned swimmer. Compassionate yet focused, this suspenseful tale filled its readers with an "absolute need to see."

Taylor Brown’s “Rhino Girl,” which was also a compassionate but tough, economical story, won second place and also was selected for publication.

Here are the full guidelines for the 2017 Doris Betts Fiction Prize:

  • The competition is open to any writer who is a legal resident of North Carolina or a member of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. North Carolina Literary Review subscribers with North Carolina connections (lives or has lived in NC) are also eligible.
  • The competition is for previously unpublished short stories up to 6,000 words. Multiple entries ok, but each requires a separate entry fee. No novel excerpts. Stories do NOT have to relate to NCLR’s annual special feature topic.
  • The deadline is Wednesday, February 15.
  • Simultaneous submissions ok, but please notify us immediately if your work is accepted elsewhere.
  • Submit previously unpublished stories online at https://nclr.submittable.com/submit.
  • Submittable will collect your entry fee via credit card ($10 NCWN members or NCLR subscribers / $20 for non-members/non-subscribers).
  • To pay submission fees by check or money order, make payable to the North Carolina Writers' Network and mail to: Ed Southern, PO Box 21591, Winston-Salem, NC 27120- 1591
  • Documents must be Microsoft Word or .rtf files. Author's name should not appear on manuscripts. (Submittable will collect and record your name and contact information.) If you have any problems submitting electronically, email NCLR's Submission Manager.
  • If submitting by mail, mail story manuscript with a cover sheet providing name, address, email address, word count, and manuscript title, to:

NCLR
ECU Mailstop
555 English
Greenville, NC 27858-4353
(but mail payment to the Network as per instructions above)

The winner and finalists will be announced by May 1. The winning story and select finalists will be published in the next year’s issue of the North Carolina Literary Review.

Questions may be directed to Margaret Bauer, Editor of the North Carolina Literary Review, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The non-profit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.


GREENVILLE—Registration is now open for the North Carolina Writers' Network's second online class, "Breaking Up Is Hard to Do," led by poet Gabrielle Brant Freeman.

The class will take place on Wednesday, January 25, at 7:00 pm, online. This course is capped at forty (40) registrants, first-come, first-served.

Breaking up is hard to do. At least, that’s what they say. When writing poetry, knowing how and where to break a line can seem difficult, so Gabrielle would like to suggest that bringing a sense of play to breaking up lines and line revision can make it easier and fun! In this workshop, participants will experiment with several methods of breaking lines. Using various texts, they will discuss how line breaks create rhythm, pace, and meaning for the reader. Participants will have the option to submit a short piece of writing prior to the workshop date to be used interactively. Specific details will be sent to registrants in advance of the class.

Gabrielle Brant Freeman's poetry has been published in many journals, most recently in Barrelhouse, Hobart, Melancholy Hyperbole, Rappahannock Review, storySouth, and Waxwing. She was nominated twice for the Best of the Net, and she was a 2014 finalist. Gabrielle won the 2015 Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition. Press 53 published her first book, When She Was Bad, in 2016. Gabrielle earned her MFA through Converse College. Read her poems and more at http://gabriellebrantfreeman.squarespace.com.

"Breaking Up Is Hard to Do" is the North Carolina Writers' Network's second offering in their 2016-2017 Winter Series. Additional online classes are planned for February and March.

"This new program initiative allows us to further our mission to connect and serve all the writers of North Carolina," said NCWN communications director Charles Fiore. "We view these online courses as a supplement to our current programs, and we remain committed to continuing to offer ample opportunities for all of us to get together face-to-face and in-person as well."

The online class "Breaking Up Is Hard to Do" is available to anyone with an internet connection. Instructions for accessing the online class on Wednesday, January 25, will be sent to registrants no less than twenty-four hours prior to the start of class.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org

 

Hats Off! to Brenda Kay Ledford whose story "Angels Over Iraq" appeared in the anthology The Best Angel Stories 2016 (Guideposts Books and Inspirational Media).

 

Hats Off! to Russell W. Johnson, winner of the Robert L. Fish Memorial Award, presented at the Edgar Awards for best short story by a new author. The winning story, "Chung Ling Soo's Greatest Trick," was one he'd submitted to the North Carolina Writers' Network Critiquing and Editing Service and received excellent feedback from Ruth Moose.

 

Hats Off! to Chuck and Heidi Thurston who have signed on with Indigo Sea Press (formerly Second Wind Publishing): Chuck for Senior Scribbles Unearthed and Senior Scribbles Second Dose; Heidi forThe Duchess, the Knight and the Leprechaun.

 

Hats Off! to Terry Himes who won second place in the Charlotte Writers' Club Nonfiction Contest with "Betty and Bernice," a tale of Terry’s two mothers. Terry will receive $75 and a certificate at the February CWC meeting. The judge was Dannye Romine Powell, the Books columnist for the Charlotte Observer and author of three poetry collections and a work of nonfiction.

 

Hats Off! to Philip Gerard whose debut album, American Anthem, will launch in February. Gerard's music looks "both outward toward our history and culture for inspiration and inward toward our deepest loves." American Anthem is a textured musical quilt of the American experience, from hobos and cowboys to more personal songs of touring the open road and finding love under an Arizona moon, featuring flat-picked and finger-style guitar, fiddle, keyboards, and multiple harmonies.

 

Hats Off! to David R. Tanis whose story "Christmas, 1963, Fort Sill, Oklahoma" appears in O-Dark-Thirty.

 

Hats Off! to Sharon C. Williams, author of the new children's chapter book Jasper: Amazon Friends and Family (October, 2015), who was interviewed by Lorna Suzuki in All Kinds of Writing.

Hats Off! to NCWN board member Alice Osborn whose new poetry collection, Heroes without Capes, was reviewed by CL Bledsoe in Pedestal Magazine. "Underlying Osborn’s humor is a sense of grounding in working-class culture. Her references are more likely to come from pop culture than Greek tragedies, though she’s got a few of those as well...[her poems balance] the sacred and profane, the lewd and the clean."

 

Hats Off! to Joan Leotta whose feature on former North Carolina poet laureate and activist Joseph Bathanti appears in Ambassador Magazine, the publication of the National Italian American Foundation.

 

Hats Off! to Alli Marshall of Asheville whose short story “Structural Soul” won the 2016 Shrewd Writer flash fiction contest. Her story was chosen because of its "intriguing characters, bizarre subject matter, and compelling content."

 

Hats Off! to Lisa Hosokawa Garber, Faith Holsaert, and Elizabeth Zertuche, whose work appears in the newest issue of Firefly Ridge Literary Magazine.

 

Hats Off! to Kathie Collins whose piece "Before Reading" won an Honorable Mention in the 2016 Ruth Moose Flash Fiction Contest, sponsored by the Charlotte Writers' Club.

 

Hats Off! to Joan Leotta whose poem "Three Crows and a Storm" is forthcoming in Gnarled Oak.

 

Hats Off! to Maren O. Mitchell whose poem "Raymond Duvall, Sleeper" appears in the January, 2016, issue of the English online poetry journal, The Lake.

 

Hats Off! to Brenda Kay Ledford whose essay "Five Brothers in the Civil War," co-written with Barbara Ledford Wright, was published on the North Carolina Civil War Center website.

 

Hats Off! to Tina Barr whose poem "Agricultural Fair" is featured on the website of The Gettysburg Review.

 

The Secret of Isobel Key

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Secret of Isobel Key by Jen McConnel

Bloomsbury Spark
$4.99, e-book
ISBN: 9781619634640
December, 2013
Fiction, YA
Available from the publisher or www.Amazon.com

Lou is in the middle of a quarter-life crisis. Fresh out of college, she’s unemployed and unsure of herself. But when she gets the chance to escape to Scotland with her best friend, it could be the answer to her quest for self-discovery. The trip is not at all what she expected, especially when her tour guide turns out to be the dreamy historian Brian, and together they embark on a hunt for information about Isobel Key, a woman accused of witchcraft in the seventeenth century.

They set out to learn the truth of the condemned witch, but Lou isn’t prepared for the knowledge that awaits her. She must face her own demons if she has any hope of righting the wrongs of the past.

Flashing between the seventeenth century and modern day Scotland, The Secret of Isobel Key is a mystery that will please readers of all ages.

Jen McConnel first began writing poetry as a child. A Michigander by birth, she now lives and writes in the beautiful state of North Carolina. When she isn't crafting worlds of fiction, she teaches college writing composition and yoga. Once upon a time, she was a middle school teacher, a librarian, and a bookseller, but those are stories for another time.

Visit http://www.jenmcconnel.com to learn more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eye of the Beholder by Scott Owens

Main Street Rag
$15, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-59948-441-9
January, 2014
Poetry
Available from the publisher

"The poetry of Scott Owens traces the contours of loss and hope, possibility and renewal. A heartfelt quality or soulfulness, best defined as the determination to speak honestly and courageously of important personal matters, pervades this book and gives it emotional urgency page after page. Drawn to what he calls 'a poetics of excess,' Owens nevertheless embodies Cocteau’s definition of tact—'knowing how far to go in going too far'—while striking a similar balance between long poems and haiku-like or koan-like short ones, which provide a kind of seasoning for the feast of the whole. Especially notable at the book’s center is a love poem Neruda would have been happy to write, the laser-intense 'You in the Tomb of My Eyes,' a paean to the night that anchors the surrounding testimonies to a life lived passionately and thoughtfully. Owens knows poetry is a serious business; while various other poets these days might seem caught up in gamesmanship, this poet plays for keeps."
—Philip Dacey, Editor of Strong Measures

Not love poems exactly, but certainly poems about love.

Originally from Greenwood, SC, Scott Owens holds degrees from Ohio University, UNC Charlotte, and UNC Greensboro. He currently lives in Hickory, NC, where he teaches at Catawba Valley Community College, edits Wild Goose Poetry Review and 234, writes for the Outlook Newspaper, and serves as vice-president of the NC Poetry Society. Eye of the Beholder is his 11th book of poetry. His work has received awards from the Academy of American Poets, the Pushcart Prize Anthology, the Next Generation/Indie Lit Awards, the NC Writers Network, the NC Poetry Society, and the Poetry Society of SC. His website is www.scottowenspoet.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starting Over by Elizabeth Spencer

Liverlight
$24.95, hardcover
ISBN: 978-0871406811
January, 2014
Fiction
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

One of the masters of American short fiction—author of The Light in the Piazza—returns with a new collection of stories.

On the release of her first novel in 1948, Elizabeth Spencer was immediately championed by Robert Penn Warren and Eudora Welty, setting off a remarkable career as one of the great literary voices of the American South. Her career, now spanning seven decades, continues here with nine new stories. In Starting Over, Spencer returns to the deep emotional fault lines and unseen fractures that lie just beneath the veneer of happy family life. In “Sightings,” a troubled daughter suddenly returns to the home of the father she accidently blinded during her parents’ bitter separation; in “Blackie,” the reappearance of a son from a divorcee’s first marriage triggers a harrowing confrontation with her new family; while in “The Wedding Visitor,” a cousin travels home only to find himself entwined in the events leading up to a family wedding. In these nine stories, Spencer excels at revealing the flawed fabric of human relations.

Malcolm Jones called one of the stories in the book, "On the Hill," one of the "best stories I’ve ever read" in the New York Times Sunday Book Review.

Elizabeth Spencer is regarded as one of America’s most outstanding fiction writers. Spencer was born in Carrollton, Mississippi, in 1921 to a storytelling and book-loving family in a community steeped in the oral traditions of the South, and subsequently set many of her works in the hill country and deltas of Mississippi and Louisiana. The author of nine novels, many fine short stories, and the famous novella The Light in the Piazza, Spencer has received the Award of Merit Medal for the Short Story from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, of which she is a member. She has also been awarded the Cleanth Brooks Medal by the Fellowship of Southern Writers, and the North Carolina Award for Literature. Many of her stories and short fiction have recently been collected, along with six new stories, in The Southern Woman (2001), published to wide critical acclaim. She is a member of the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenge on the Fly by Michael Cavender

CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
$14.99, paperback / $8.95, e-book
ISBN: 978-1484915103
November, 2013
Fiction
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

"Revenge on the Fly is a beautiful meditation on the ties that bind us to family and place. Michael Cavender is a gifted writer, an exciting new voice in North Carolina literature."
—Ron Rash, New York Times best-selling author of Serena and The Cove

"Cavender's potent homage to ancient old growth forests and the power of nature juxtaposes nicely against the very real threat of development, but there's more at work with the complex Phelps siblings. Revenge on the Fly is an engrossing mix of atmosphere and strongly drawn characters, with Ben Phelps at its center unraveling the darkness that lies at the heart of his family's secrets. Compelling and well-written, Cavender's writing draws readers into his tale of evil control, redemption, and the power of hope."
—Marni Graff, author, The Blue Virgin , The Green Remains

Dissolute outdoor writer Ben Phelps grasps the chance to avenge a life-ruining lie despite the human costs to a friend who holds the means for revenge, and to the woman whose love may reward his boldness.

Decades ago, Watt Phelps told his younger brother Ben a lie that drove him into dark despair and disinheritance from a family fortune. When a pathway opens for overdue vengeance, retribution demands Ben’s willingness to send his brother to prison, as well as the new friend who secretes the crime that’s the key to justice. The pathway also opens Ben’s heart to prove to a suspicious woman he’s worthy of her trust and love. These converging challenges might save Ben’s unknown legacy, the last old-growth forest in the Blue Ridge Mountains, from Watt’s destruction, and restore a life tainted by his brother’s duplicity. In Revenge on the Fly, Ben learns that his bitter perceptions of success and failure are only part of his life-long delusions, and that loving completely means risking everything.

Michael Cavender is a North Carolina writer who directed the Highlands-Cashiers Land Trust, North Carolina’s oldest land conservation trust. He was also a newspaper reporter and fly-fishing guide on the rivers and streams of the southern Blue Ridge Mountains. A graduate of The University of Tennessee, he lives near Chapel Hill, North Carolina, where he is working on his next novel, a crime thriller.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drop Dead Gorgeous: L.A. Vamps Book One by Suki McMinn

Temptress Press
$3.99, e-book
ASIN: B00HORWK28
January, 2014
Fiction
Available from www.Amazon.com

Derek Randall is an L.A. supermodel who’s made a vampire, but longs to return to the life he loved. With the help of his true love, Clara, an unemployed modeling agent who’s just getting used to being bitten, as well as his nest of hunky “brothers,” he struggles to learn what it is to be a vampire. He and Clara launch his new modeling career, and Derek begins a dangerous game, trying to keep his evil maker, Madeline, at bay. Derek will sacrifice everything to save Clara—his career, his vampire brothers, and even his very existence. Love gives Derek more strength than dark magic ever could.

Suki McMinn grew up in Asheville, North Carolina, has an English Literature degree from the University of Tennessee, and spent most of her adult life in the entertainment industry in Los Angeles. She now lives in Tryon, in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina with her husband and rescued dogs. She’s also a photographer, potter, and fiber artist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curing Time by Tim Swink

Pegasus Books
$16.95, paperback
ISBN: 978-0-9910993-1-3
December, 2013
Fiction
Available at your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

Curing Time is tobacco's season of harvest, a time of transformation when the leaf is made golden by subjection to fire and heat. Tobacco farmer Hume Rankin endures his own curing time in the summer of 1959. When the rains won't come and the crops wilt in the field, he solicits the magic of a blind, old black woman. She warns about the dangers of calling on the middle world and tells him once those spirits are unleashed, it is they who decide when and how the spell unfolds. Hume dismisses her warning, to his peril. When his life-long nemesis, whose always had his eye on Hume's land as well as his wife, is found dead, all eyes are on Hume. He faces the all-too real possibility of losing his land, his family and even his life. Sitting in a jail cell, uncertain of his own innocence, he finds himself lost and a long way from home. Recalling the old woman's warning, he is haunted by the possibility that he may have played a part in his own demise.

Tim Swink studied Legal Administration at Greensboro College and has worked in the legal profession for over twenty years. He is winding down his "day job" and has come home to his first love, writing. Prior to his legal career, he was the Managing Editor of a weekly newspaper in Moore County. He has worked for USA Today, the Greensboro News and Record, Tarheel Magazine, and is currently a contributing writer for O.Henry Magazine. A sequel to Curing Time is in the works, as well as a third book entitled, Madd Inlet which takes place at Sunset Beach, North Carolina, in 1968-1969, during the turbulent crux of the Vietnam war. Tim is the grandson of a North Carolina tobacco farmer and has peeled the caked tobacco juice from his hands, as well. Tim and his wife, Renee, reside in Greensboro.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eulogy for an Imperfect Man: Poems by Maureen A. Sherbondy

Brick Road Poetry Press
15.95, paperback
ISBN: 978-0-983535304-3-5
March, 2013
Poetry
Available from the publisher (Pre-order and shipping is free)

"These are poems as restless as the ghosts that pass from page to page, and they'll haunt you long after you leave the last line. Sherbondy's stark images are as true as her unflinching examination of our struggle to put the dead to rest and let our pasts be past."
—Barbara Presnell, Piece Work

Maureen Sherbondy’s books are After the Fairy Tale, Praying at Coffee Shops, The Slow Vanishing, Weary Blues, and Scar Girl. She recently won the Spring Garden Press Robert Watson Poetry Award for The Year of Dead Fathers. The book will be published this summer. Her full-length collection, Eulogy for an Imperfect Man, is forthcoming from Brick Road Poetry Press. Her fiction has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She received an MFA from Queens University of Charlotte. Maureen lives in Raleigh with her three sons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ten Poems and Eleven Paintings, Christmas 2009 by Laurence Holden

Laurence Holden
$4.99, iPad
December, 2012
Poetry
Available on iTunes

Ten Poems and Eleven Paintings, Christmas 2009 is a book where vision and poetry gather, where sound and sight converse. These paintings and poems share something important—a concentrated form of paying attention—paying attention to what is! And what is, is both moving and still, both seen and unseen, heard and unheard. The paintings are still, yet move in our minds, thoughts, and feelings. The poems move in our minds, our thoughts, our feelings, and yet they form pooling echoes of the still and eternal present. Paintings and poems—two sides of one coin.

This electronic version includes two additional videos and is developed and adapted by Louis Leon from a handmade limited edition book the artist created and gave for a Christmas gift to friends and family in 2009.

Laurence Holden lives along Warwoman Creek in the Southern Appalachian Mountains of the US, drawing his paintings and poems from his connection to the land here. His work in paint and word are just two natural dialects for the same thing—bearing witness to the Creation. His work articulates a belief that if we can restore our understanding of the land and our relationship to it, we might save ourselves too in these perilous times. 

Laurence's poems have appeared in several issues of the Chrysalis Reader, as well as in Written River, Appalachian Heritage, and The Reach of Song: The Poetry Anthology of the Georgia Poetry Society, 2011 and 2010, His work received an award of excellence from the Georgia Poetry Society in 2010 and an honorable mention from the Byron Herbert Reece Society in 2011. His paintings have appeared in over twenty solo exhibits, and are represented in over 200 public, private, and corporate collections.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Near Waking by Dede Wilson

Finishing Line Press
$12.00, paperback
March, 2013
Poetry
Available from the publisher

"Dede Wilson's Near Waking tantalizes the reader with its energetic poems that flirt with irony and age, gracefully tip-toeing around the edges of grief with a playfulness of forms that give pleasure and insight.... This is a downright exquisite gathering of poems."
—Kathryn Stripling Byer, former N.C. Poet Laureate and recent inductee, N.C. Literary Hall of Fame

"You might feel a shiver...the chill of recognition, of glimpsing your daylight self and its shadow reflected in the same mirror, caught in those gauzy moments between dream and waking."
—Rebecca McClanahan, author of Deep Light: New and Selected Poems and The Riddle Song and Other Rememberings.

Dede Wilson is the author of four previous books of poems: Eliza: The New Orleans Years, Glass, Sea of Small Fears, and One Nightstand, a collection of light verse in forms followed by a primer to poetic form. Four poems from Eliza: The New Orleans Years were published in Nimrod as finalists for the Pablo Neruda Prize, and the poem "Yellow Fever," published as "Hydra," was nominated for a Pushcart. Her poems have appeared in Carolina Quarterly, Spoon River Poetry Review, Poet Lore, New Orleans Poetry Review, Poem, Cream City Review, Tar River Poetry, Iodine Poetry Journal, Flyway, Southern Poetry Review, Cave Wall, South Carolina Poetry Review, Asheville Poetry Review, The Lyric, Light, and many other journals. She has published short stories, essays, and a family memoir, Fourth Child, Second Daughter. Dede is a former travel editor of the Dallas Times-Herald. A native of Louisiana, she has lived in Charlotte, North Carolina, since 1967. She and her husband have two grown sons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ink in the Wheels: Stories to Make Love Roll by S. Barton and Megan M. Cutter

Cutter’s Edge Consulting, LLC
$15.97, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-4675-4459-7
February 15, 2013
Memoir
Available from the publisher and www.Amazon.com

A groundbreaking memoir about love, disability and perseverance, Ink in the Wheels: Stories to Make Love Roll is the unlikely story of Barton and Megan Cutter, and their journey to build a successful marriage despite others expectations. Barton Cutter, who has Cerebral Palsy never expected to fall in love, never mind getting married, and Megan was still grieving over the loss of a relationship and the death of her mother. Until now, there have been few accounts of a couple that addresses the themes of disability, intimacy, and marriage. Ink in the Wheels: Stories to Make Love Roll delves into themes of family influences and dynamics, creating external and internal support networks, direct support staff and the balance of care giving, losing faith in one another and themselves—and finding it again.

Watch the book trailer here.

With a BA in Creative Writing from the University of Arizona, Barton has created for himself and his family a life that speaks to his deepest values. His passion for helping others grow is evident in his writing, teaching martial arts, and life coaching, not to mention his ever-optimistic approach to life. He has written on disability-related issues for The Raleigh News & Observer, ABILITY Magazine, the NC Council on Developmental Disabilities, Persona Magazine, the NC Office on Disability & Health, and the NC Disability Action Network.

With a BA in English/Creative Journaling from Randolph-Macon Woman’s College, Megan has focused her writing efforts by organizing local literary events and supporting the local writing community. Studying Aboriginal oral tradition in Alice Springs, Australia, she has distinctive ability to see many angles of the story and uses joy and laughter to honor these essential aspects of our stories.

Megan has published clips in Natural Awakenings, Med Monthly, News & Observer (North Raleigh News), Circa, and Jubilation. Her writing features local community organizations, emphasizes local sustainability, and brings together different communities into common goals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another F-Word: A Novel by Lissa Brown

CreateSpace
Kindle, $6.99 / Paperback, $15.95
ISBN: 978-1481908450
January, 2013
Fiction
Available at www.Amazon.com

Gentle Rory Calhoun Wilson is the antithesis of the 1950s cowboy he’s named for. He loathes sports, NASCAR, and everything else his father adores, putting the two on a collision course fueled by Darrell Wilson’s inability to control contempt for his son’s emerging homosexuality. Another F-Word is a story of bullying, courage, and love. It examines parental struggles to support a gay child, the role that schools and religious institutions play, the tragedy of teen suicide, and the ability of a rural Bible Belt boy to remain open to people who can influence his life in remarkable ways. Rory’s is a story of triumph over the scarring effects of being labeled and bullied.

Each of Lissa Brown’s careers has contributed to her current one, full-time author. She gained insight into adolescent behavior as a high school teacher and honed her writing skills and sense of the absurd during award-winning careers in marketing and public relations. She’s been a media consultant to gubernatorial and legislative campaigns, a columnist, and speechwriter for public officials and corporate executives. She is the author of a humorous memoir, a young adult novel, and several published articles and essays. Another F-Word is her latest novel. www.lissabrownwrites.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

School of the Americas by David Rigsbee

Black Lawrence Press
$14.00, paperback
ISBN: 978-0-9837945-0-9
January, 2013
Poetry
Available from the publisher, your local bookstore, or www.Amazon.com

"David Rigsbee's poems move with philosophical intensities. The perspectives the poems offer are complex, highly nuanced, rooted in critical engagements with a cultural tradition, and often less comfortable than the refusal of perspective practiced by more vertiginous writers."
—Robert McNama

David Rigsbee is the author of 18 books and chapbooks, including seven previous full-length collections of poems. His latest books, The Red Tower: New & Selected Poems and The Pilot House, a Black River Poetry Prize Chapbook, were both recently released. In addition to his poems, he has also published critical works on Carolyn Kizer and Joseph Brodsky. He has co-edited two anthologies, including Invited Guest: An Anthology of Twentieth Century Southern Poetry, a “notable book” selection of the American Library Association and the American Association of University Professors and featured on C-Span Booknotes. His work has appeared in The American Poetry Review, The Georgia Review, The Iowa Review, The New Yorker, The Iowa Review, The Ohio Review, Poetry, Prairie Schooner, The Sewanee Review, The Southern Review, and many others. Winner of the Pound Prize and the Vachel Lindsay Award, he has also been recipient of fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, The Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, The Virginia Commission on the Arts, The Djerassi Foundation, and the Academy of American Poets. He is 2010 winner of the Sam Ragan Award for contribution to the arts in North Carolina. Rigsbee is currently contributing editor for The Cortland Review.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

America One: The Launch by TI Wade

TI Wade
$5.99, Kindle
ASIN: B00B2GC0IQ
January, 2013
Fiction
Available at www.Amazon.com

Ryan Richmond has dreamed about going to space since the age of seven. Reading space updates—and seeing pictures of Neil Armstrong on the lunar surface in National Geographic—was the ignition of this dream.

At nineteen he sold his first company and employed the remnants of the Russian Space Program, three of the best space brains in the world.

In his twenties he founded and sold two more companies and hired the most outstanding scientists and engineers from the European Space Authority.

During his thirties, after selling his third company, he invested heavily in Internet start-ups, like Google, netting billions.

Then he patiently waited until NASA’s shuttle program came to an end and contracted the best brains in the U.S. Space program.

Now, Ryan Richmond is in his forties, and still wants to go to space.

The only problem is that the newly elected Administration and members of Congress don’t have a current space program, and they want his!

TI Wade grew up in Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), and once he completed his mandatory military commitments at 23, left Africa to mature in Europe. He enjoyed Europe and lived in three countries throughout fifteen years: England, Germany and Portugal. He enjoyed learning their ways of life, and languages, before returning to Africa: Cape Town in 1989. There he owned and ran a restaurant, a coffee manufacturing and retail business, flew a Cessna 210 around desolate southern Africa, and achieved marriage in 1992.

Due to the upheavals of the political turmoil in South Africa, the Wade family of three moved to the United States in 1996. Park City, Utah, was where his writing career began in 1997. To date, he has written nine novels. Currently, he lives with his wife and two teenage children twenty miles south of Raleigh. His first series, INVASION USA, has been a top-selling hit series, addressing the question, What could happen if every bit of technology created in China in the past thirty years were to all shut down at once? His current series, AMERICA ONE, is another hard-hitting series, with a greater focus on technology and space exploration.

TI Wade is on the web at www.tiwade.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Extinction by H.V. Purvis

Second Wind Publishing Co.
$13.95, paperback / $4.99, e-book
ISBN 978-1-938101-60-1
October, 2013
Fiction
Available from www.Amazon.com

Try to imagine a future where almost all your family and friends become infected with a virus that made them stronger and more agile, grow fur, develop claws, lose the ability to reason or be able to speak and become murderously violent toward anyone not infected. Now imagine this rage being so consuming that they continue to attack until either they or you are dead.

This is the world in which our heroes find themselves. What must they do to survive? Are there other survivors out there?

Hoyle Purvis, who writes under the name H.V. Purvis, was born in 1952 and reared in the country between High Falls and Bennett in central North Carolina. Raised in the country, he learned to raise animals, farm, handle guns, shoot, ride horses and spent many hours daily riding the trails around his home.

His talents in music lead to an Associate in Arts degree in music from Sandhills Community College, a Bachelor in Arts in music education from Pfeiffer University and a Masters in music from Appalachian State University. After college, he worked as a church music director and taught high school chorus and theatre. In 1992, he left teaching and started Purvis Appraisals, a real estate appraisal business.

He has three children from his first marriage. He considers them to be three of his best friends.

He and Ally, his current wife, live on a small ranch in Scotland County adjoining forty-three thousand acres of State wildlife preserve. They have eleven horses, a faithful dog, an affectionate cat, some Guinea hens and a few chickens. They ride regularly on the wildlife preserve, at the beach, and in the mountains.

Purvis is an avid reader. Several years ago, he and his active imagination developed a story idea. He wrote it out and began to developed it into the Extinction series. That story and the encouragement he received from his friends and family have led to an obsession for writing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 A Piece of Calm by Sally Stewart Mohney

Finishing Line Press
$14.00, paperback
Poetry
March, 2014
Available for pre-order from the publisher

"Sally Stewart Mohney gives us vivid insights into nature and family in these excellent poems, but what I admire just as much is the superb sound-play in her poetry."
—Ron Rash, author of Sabrina

"Sally Stewart Mohney’s poems sing with mystery, but they are never ethereal, never ephemeral or buried in obliquity. Instead, Mohney’s world is rooted in stunning imagery and clarity, and her poems are designed with care and grace. They are bold, luminous, and tender, gathered together to form vivid silences that reside in both heart and mind. Their lyricism and incandescence demand multiple readings. Mohney is a new and significant voice in American poetry."
—William Wright, editor of The Southern Poetry Anthology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reversal by Eric Linne

CreateSpace
$13.99, paperback / $6.99, e-book
ISBN: 978-0-1492196549
November, 2013
Fiction—Young Adult
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

Fourteen-year-old Kayla Burbadge has had one tough life. She's lost her parents, been forced to move from bustling Chicago to a small Indiana farm town, and starts high school with no friends. How tough is she? When a janitor sees her fighting an older boy who made the mistake of picking on her, the janitor offers her a unique opportunity. Reluctantly, Kayla accepts and the new kid in school becomes the first and only girl to compete in a male-dominated environment. As Kayla battles her way through her new endeavor, her self-confidence grows as she bonds with her new allies. Her emotional growth helps her connect with her new family and display empathy for other students who are suffering. In the end, she faces a final pivotal challenge—a challenge that means not only victory for her, but a job for the janitor who believed in her.

Reversal is a realistic, present-day novel which merges a coming-of-age drama with a fast-action sports story. The novel explores the themes of family, home, community, unlikely heroes, discovering one's voice, and finding equilibrium after a major life event.

Eric Linne has a BA in English from Indiana University and MA in English from University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Prior to embarking on a writing career, he worked as a consultant for community health centers nationwide and and served as Director for Home Care for the American Hospital Association. After several years as a stay-at-home father, Eric wrote his first screenplay, The Bears of Blue River, adapted from the novel of the same name. The young adult novel Reversal, which he wrote as his Master's Thesis in Children's Literature, is his debut novel. He is excited to see where Kayla's career leads.

Hats Off! to S. Lorraine Norwood whose short story, "Hosanna, A History," appeared in the 2014 New Southerner Literary Edition, edited by Bobbi Buchanan. A reading of works in the anthology was held in Louisville, KY.

 

Hats Off! to Darlena Moore who was named a finalist in the 2014 Broad River Review Rash Award in Fiction for her short story, "What It All Comes Down To."

 

Hats Off! to Sally Stewart Mohney, winner of the Southern Poetry Breakthrough Prize: North Carolina, for her poetry collection, Low Country, High Water. The book will be released in 2016 by Texas Review Press.

 

Hats Off! to Glenda Beall whose poem will appear in the forthcoming Southern Poetry Anthology Vol VII: North Carolina (Texas Review Press), edited by William Wright. The anthology includes four NC poet laureates, Robert Morgan, Ron Rash, Janice Moore, Nancy Simpson, Maren Mitchell, Scott Owen, and more.

 

Hats Off! to Gilda Morina Syverson who will celebrate the publication of her memoir, My Father's Daughter, From Rome to Sicily, at Queens University of Charlotte on Sunday, March 1, 2:00-4:00 pm. Free and open to the public!

 

Hats Off! to Lenard D. Moore, winner of the 2014 NC Literature Award, who was profiled recently in the Jacksonville Daily News.

 

Hats Off! to Heather Bell Adams whose story "Three Lies and a Truth" appears in edition #457 of Thick Jam.

 

Hats Off! to Renea Winchester whose book on farming and cooking, Farming, Friends, and Fried Bologna Sandwiches, was reviewed in the Southern Literary Review.

 

Hats Off! to Jonathan K. Rice who has a poem forthcoming in Pirene’s Fountain, a biannual online poetry journal.

 

Hats Off! to Allison Freeman whose flash-fiction story, "The Expectation of Another Day," appears in the January Issue of Bartleby Snopes.

 

Hats Off! to Joseph Mills whose poem "When Will These Three" is the TIE Poem of the Month in The Inquisitive Eater.

 

Hats Off! to Susan M. Steadman: a scene from her full-length play, Love Is a Seven-Letter Word, has been accepted for publication in The Best Scenes for Kids Ages 7-15, edited by Lawrence Harbison for Applause. Publication is tentatively set for December. The news is enhanced by the fact that her daughter Paige, a theatre practitioner in the Atlanta area, has had a scene accepted from one of her plays as well!

 

Hats Off! to Joan Leotta whose ten-minute play, "Pinpoint Wisdom," will be produced by Fort Point Theatre Channel of Boston as part of Channel/Dance: An Evening of Movement, Art, and Theater, February 13-14, 2015. Also, The Penny Dreadful accepted one of her twenty-one-word stories for its next issue.

 

Hats Off! to Joseph Cavano who, although he has written only five flash fiction stories, each has been published or is forthcoming. The latest, a 500-word story titled "Tender Things,” will appear in The Zodiac Review sometime in mid-March.

 

Hats Off! to Ruth Moose whose short story "Born Mean" appears in the January 2015 issue of Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine. Moose's first novel, Doing it at the Dixie Dew, won the Malice Award and was published by St. Martin's Press.

 

Hats Off! to Kathy Ackerman of Tryon who received an honorable mention for her poem “April 19, 1906” in the Rash Award in Poetry sponsored by the Broad River Review. Tina Barr of Black Mountain; Terri Kirby Erickson of Lewisville; Janet Joyner of Winston-Salem; and Alice Osborn of Raleigh were named finalists.

 

Hats Off! to Kim Church whose debut novel, Byrd, won the 2015 Crook's Corner Book Prize. The prize honors an exceptional debut novel set in the American South. Church will receive a $1,000 prize and a free glass of wine for a year from Crook’s Corner, in Chapel Hill.

 

Hats Off! to Laurie McKay whose debut novel, Villain Keeper (HarperCollins Feb 2015), is featured on the Winter Kids' Indie Next List, in the 9-12 year old group.

 

Nuclear Apples? The Third Penny Weaver Mystery by Judy Hogan

CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
$15.00, paperback
ISBN: 978-1530404506
September, 2016
Fiction: Mystery
Available from www.Amazon.com

"In the late 1990s and early 2000s, Judy Hogan was involved in a real-life citizen movement to keep high-level radioactive waste from being shipped from around the Carolinas and stored at a nuclear plant near her home. She has turned that successful struggle into a thrilling whodunit. This book captures the feeling of community and empowerment that came from neighbors banding together for the common good, and it reminds us that the same courage and solidarity are still needed today to guide the conscience of corporations, governments, and the media."
—Jim Warren, Executive Director of NC WARN

"In this compelling story of community activism set in 1992, Penny Weaver stands firmly with others concerned about the dangerous storage of nuclear waste in close proximity to her neighborhood. Will those who control the nuclear plant stop at nothing to undermine those protesting, including murder?"
—K.M. Rockwood, author, Jesse Damon mysteries

Penny Weaver, a mid-50s unconventional poet/activist, takes on a nuclear plant CEO who has political clout. Against a backdrop of environmental racism Penny Weaver sticks her neck out to free her friend, Riverdell’s community leader and nuclear scientist, who is accused of murder. Will Penny and her housemates’ dream of an apple orchard be defeated by the cataclysm of nuclear fire? Two of the plant’s public relations directors who secretly offer information to the community group are shot. Penny copes with a slit tire, being followed, her room vandalized, and police brutality at a sit-in, but still the real killer eludes her. Suspects include Penny’s skinhead neighbor, the plant’s CEO, who instigates violence against the demonstrators, and a pro-nuclear power supporter.

Judy Hogan’s first two mystery novels, Killer Frost (2012) and Farm Fresh and Fatal (2013), were published by Mainly Murder Press. Her third was published December, 2015, by Hoganvillaea Books. Haw was published May, 2016.

Judy founded Carolina Wren Press (1976-91) and was co-editor of Hyperion Poetry Journal (1970-81). She has published six volumes of poetry and two prose works with small presses. She has taught all forms of creative writing since 1974. In 1983 she helped found the North Carolina Writers’ Network and served as its first president (1984-87). She joined Sisters in Crime in 2007 and has focused on writing and publishing traditional mystery novels.

In 2011, she was a finalist in the St. Martin’s Malice Domestic Mystery contest for Killer Frost. In 2015, she decided to set up Hoganvillaea Books, her own publishing imprint, in order to publish more of her mysteries. The Sands of Gower: The First Penny Weaver Mystery was her first release under this new imprint.

Her Penny Weaver series takes up community issues. Most of the novels take place in the central North Carolina fictional village of Riverdell, but three take place on the Gower Peninsula in Wales where Penny meets and falls in love with Kenneth Morgan, a Welsh Detective Inspector.

The twists and turns of Hogan’s life’s path over the years have given her plenty to write about. She is also a small farmer, a community activist, and lives in Moncure.

 

The Silver Dolphin by Dawn Reno Langley

CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
$15.95, paperback / $2.99, e-book
ISBN: 978-1535131124
July, 2016
Fiction: Women's
Available from your local bookstore or www.Amazon.com

When heiress Carrie Debary abandons Houston high society for a simpler life in Hawaii, she never dreams she'll find love with marine biologist Alex Madison. Then an accident leaves her new husband badly injured, and Carrie is drawn into an illicit liaison with Jack Briskin. Returning to Texas, Carrie throws herself into work with the fervor of a woman who wants to forget.

Dawn Reno Langley writes novels, theater/music/dance reviews, children's books, and essays from her home in Durham, North Carolina. The sound of rain against the roof, the Outer Banks' miles of seashore, and her grandson's laughter are her greatest joys. Dawn says: "A writer is especially lucky if they enjoy a constant source of inspiration, and I'm always inspired by a culture different from my own. When I visited a friend who lives on the big island, Hawaii, I was doing research for a section on quilts for one of my antique books. To be in that gorgeously wild place and learning about its history, the people, and their arts was truly inspiring. Even more thrilling--the whales giving birth offshore, the pod of spinner dolphins that swam with us, the sea turtles who soared like undersea birds. They call Hawai'i paradise, but reality intrudes there, as well, and I wanted to explore what it means when a good marriage is pushed to its limits by mental health issues. To learn more about the trip to Hawai'i, read my essay entitled Whale Mothers." Viist her website: www.http://www.imustbeoff.com/2014/07/whale-mothers-by-dawn-reno-langley.html.

 

Down to Sleep by Scott Owens

Main Street Rag
$15.00, paperback
ISBN: 978-1-59948-613-0
November, 2016
Poetry
Available from the publisher

"Down to Sleep immerses language in praise, as the voice of Scott Owens builds a symphony of creations unique among contemporary poets. Down to Sleep ebbs and edges dream and reality in a joyful awakening. Every poem makes me feel like a child again, even as age swings on dove wings settling on broken blades of grass."
—Shelby Stephenson, Poet Laureate of North Carolina

"After a writer reaches an elevated level of technical and artistic proficiency, the next goal should be to shape an artifact that absolutely no one else could have produced. In this stunning, nightmarish collection of narrative poems, Owens has done just that. Down to Sleep is guaranteed to both enlighten and haunt its readers."
—Tim Peeler, author of Rough Beast

"These poems are sharp-edged, cutting through the dust and worn grooves of our everyday routines with dynamism and humanity. Like a script for a rainbow, these lines constantly teeter between the poet's waking life and his dream state, the twilight imagination that informs our best creative impulses, and reminds us that we are not prisoners of our personal histories, but hopeful beings that lay down at night inside skins that need shedding. In some ways, this collection is an artifact for a phantom, a manual hard-wired to reality, that tethers its creator to solid ground, even as he finds himself in the constant act of disappearing. There is a scene in Hitchcock’s 1951 film, Strangers on a Train, in which Robert Walker pops a child's balloon at a fair with his cigarette. These poems operate in just the opposite manner, locating the toxic nature and nightmares of this broken life, turning the black smoke into balloons".
—Keith Flynn, editor of Asheville Poetry Review, and author of Colony Collapse Disorder

Biography

He was born.
He suckled.
He walked.
He mastered words.
He didn't always fit in.
Difference was not appreciated.
He seemed too effeminate.
He used few words.
Some said he was crazy.
They lied who said he had wings,
who said he claimed to own the universe.
Wickedness was drawn to him.
He tried everything once,
kept what felt good,
harmed no one.
He was misunderstood.
No one could see him
as he was before he existed.
Of course they killed him.
Left hanging three days
blood settled to swollen feet,
discolored, crusted over.
Black birds pecked out
soft tissue of eyes.
He came to something new,
the body of the dream unhinged,
a different kind of sense.
If he flew it was only
because the world wanted him to.

Scott Owens holds degrees from Ohio University, UNC Charlotte, and UNC Greensboro. He teaches at Lenoir Rhyne University, edits Wild Goose Poetry Review, owns and operates Taste Full Beans Coffeehouse and Gallery, and coordinates Poetry Hickory. This is his fourteenth collection of poetry. His work has received awards from the Academy of American Poets, the Pushcart Prize Anthology, the Next Generation/Indie Lit Awards, the North Carolina Writers' Network, the NC Poetry Society, and the Poetry Society of SC. He has been featured on The Writer’s Almanac five times, and his articles about poetry have been featured in Poet’s Market four times. He is the North Carolina Writers' Network regional rep for the Central Foothills.

Hats Off! to Linda Heuring whose short story "Without Goosebumps" appears in Rosebud, Issue 56.

Hats Off! to Mark J. Havlik whose poem “The Lamb" appears in issue number 68 of Kaleidoscope: Exploring the Experience of Disability through Literature and the Fine Arts. Unique to the field of disability studies, the publication has expressed the experiences of disability from the perspective of individuals, families, friends, caregivers, and healthcare professionals, among others, since 1979.

Hats Off! to Fuquay-Varina's Third Thursday Open Mic, which was featured in the Southwest Wake News. Led by Jan B. Parker, this event gathers professional and novice writers from all over the Triangle at 6:00 pm at the Stars Theater & Arts Center. There is a Featured Reader, and Open Mic participants read for five minutes each.

Hats Off! to Malinda Fillingim whose article "Riding Bikes to Church" has been selected for publication in Carolina Country.

Hats Off! to Jan B. Parker who has a short story in Voices From the Porch, a new anthology from Main Street Rag. She also has a short story in Writing Through Your Divorce: The Blog.

Hats Off! to Terri Kirby Erickson whose award-winning poem, "Angels of Death," from her forthcoming collection, A Lake of Light and Clouds, (which will be published by Press 53 in April), has been set to music by composer and Vice President of Education for the New York Philharmonic, Theodore Wiprud, as part of a cycle for soprano, on varied poems of life, death, and nature. Wiprud refers to the poem as, "a humorous take on mortality that sneaks up on you," from a book of poems that "opens from the everyday onto the profound."

Hats off! to Thomas Wolf, whose short story, “Boundaries,” winner of the 2011 Doris Betts Fiction Prize, was nominated for a Pushcart Prize and received “Special Mention” in the 2014 edition of Pushcart Prize XXXVIII: Best of the Small Presses.

Hats Off! to Margaret A. Harrell who will be having a reading/talk/signing event at the 2014 annual Gonzo Fest in Louisville, Kentucky, for her memoirs (Keep This Quiet! My Relationship with Hunter S. Thompson, Milton Klonsky, and Jan Mensaert AND Keep THIS Quiet Too!). Others presenters include William McKeen (Outlaw Journalist), Anita Thompson (The Gonzo Way), and legendary musician David Amram. Sony Pictures will debut the Ralph Steadman documentary For No Good Reason at the Louisville Palace Theatre during the GonzoFest, weeks before its national release.

Hats Off! to Malinda Fillingim whose story "Bathroom Blessings" has been accepted by Guideposts to be published in May, 2014.

Hats Off! to Charles "LC" Fiore, whose short story "The Trench Garden," was published by Ploughshares as part of their "Solos" series. Amazon.com also chose "The Trench Garden" for their exclusive Kindle Singles series. "The Trench Garden" can be purchased for $0.99 here.

Hats Off to Laurel Ferejohn whose flash memoir piece "Worrisome Thing" has been accepted by Quiddity International Literary Journal.

Hats Off! to Kim Church whose debut novel, Byrd (Dzanc Books, March 2014), has been named one of the top 20 to-read books of the year (David Abrams, The Quivering Pen). Set in North Carolina and points west, Byrd is the fragmented family history of a child given up for adoption.

Hats Off! to Jan B. Parker whose story "A New and Different Summer," an excerpt from her novel-in-progress, will be published by GERM magazine.

Hats Off! to Marilynn Barner Anselmi whose script, Found Objects, has been named a semi-finalist for the 2014 Eugene O'Neill Playwrights Conference. This is the third consecutive year her work has made it to the semi-finalist stage.

Hats Off! to Steve Cushman whose poetry manuscript In Training received an Honorable Mention in the first annual Lena M. Shull Book Contest from the North Carolina Poetry Society.

Hats Off! to Becky Gould Gibson whose manuscript Heading Home won the first annual Lena M. Shull Book Contest. The Lena Shull Book Contest was recently created by an endowment from the North Carolina Poetry Council. Gibson will receive $250 and 50 copies of her book, which will be published by Main Street Rag. The award will be presented to her on Poetry Day at Catawba Valley Community College in April 2014.

Hats Off! to Erika Hoffman who had two stories selected as finalists for Chicken Soup for the Soul: Multitasking Mom’s Survival Guide. One is called “BUSY!,” and the other “Frenzied.” Both stories will be published in the anthology.

Hats Off! to Malinda Fillingim whose story "The Marine and I" was a finalist in the inaugural memoir writing contest sponsored by Salt, a Wilmington-based magazine. Also, her story "Lucy the Lunchroom Lady" was recently accepted for publication in Guideposts.

Hats Off! to Heather Adams, Caryn Sutorus, and Pam Van Dyk who received Honorable Mentions in the 2013 Fiction Contest sponsored by The Writers' Workshop.

Hats Off! to Erika Hoffman whose essay "Real Time" has been accepted by Mature Years. This is the ninth piece of hers they have taken.

Hats Off! to Malinda Fillingim whose story "Easter Bells" has been published in the Spring 2014 edition of Ideals, a publication of Guidepost.

Hats Off! to Tim Swink. The January issue of O.Henry Magazine is going to publish a chapter excerpt from his novel, Curing Time.

.... to Tony Brown. He  will have his short story, "A Once In A Lifetime Thing" published in Down in the Dirt magazine in April, 2011. "The Easter Gift" was published in the September 2010 issue of The Storyteller.



. . . to Jan B. Parker, who earned Second Place in the Methodist University 2011 Emerging Writers Contest as judged by Lorraine Lopez, and will read from her work, "Mayme," at the Southern Writers' Symposium on February 26. Please visit http://www.methodist.edu/sws/index.htm for more detailed information.

Publishers Weekly and BookList wrote favorable reviews of David Halperin's new book, Journal of a UFO Investigator. You can read these on David Halperin's website

Halperin will also be  doing a series of guest blogs for www.litfestmagazine.com

Rachel Pollock's piece entitled, "Until Morale Improves" was included in the anthology, Confessions: Fact or Fiction?,  edited by Herta Feely.

Website: http://www.amazon.com/Confessions-Herta-Feely-Chrysalis-Editorial/dp/1609106091/

 

Hats Off to Lookout Books, the literary imprint of the UNC-Wilmington's creative writing department. The imprint's debut novel, Binocular Vision: New & Selected Short Stories,  by Edith Pearlman, was featured on the cover of the New York Times Book Review's January 16 edition.

 

 

An excerpt from K. S. Crawford's historical novel, Keowee, was published in Wilderness House Literary Review, No. 5, Vol. 4 (www.whlreview.com).

NCWN member Mary Lambeth Moore has published her first novel, Sleeping with Patty Hearst (www.sleepingwithpattyhearst.com), with Tigress Publishing.  Lee Smith says "I got completely swept up ... Moore is a natural storyteller with a great story to tell in this novel."  Mary, a native of Reidsville, NC who now lives in Raleigh, has been a member of the NCWN since our beginning.


NCWN member Bill Cissna’s second full-length play script, All About Faith, will have a public stage reading on January 28 at Theatre Alliance, Winston-Salem. His short script, Communication Gap, will be one of 10 produced in Evening of Short Plays #24 at the Greensboro Cultural Center, February 10-13.

Rebecca Clay Haynes published her first short story, As She Lay Dying, in the Fall 2010 Edition of The Binnacle, published by the University of Maine. (Unfortunately, the issue is not yet posted online, but the print version is available.)

 

Hats Off! to Terry L. Kennedy, who has a poem in the latest issue of Heavy Feather Review!

 

Hats Off! to Ross White, who has three new poems in BODY.

 

The Hendersonville Times-News reported that Susan Snowden’s new novel made Fountainhead Bookstore’s bestseller list for 2012. Although it came out in August, it captured spot No. 2 on the list. Here’s an excerpt from the Jan. 6 article: “In the No. 2 slot is another local author, Susan Snowden, with her debut novel Southern Fried Lies. Although Snowden has been published in many literary journals, this is her first novel. Through word-of-mouth alone, Southern Fried Lies quickly climbed the bestselling list, even beating out Fifty Shades of Grey." Susan has been a NCWN writer since 1996 when she moved to the mountains from Atlanta.

 

Hats Off! to William Wortman, Jr., of Statesville, who received an Honorable Mention in the 2012 Memoirs Contest sponsored by the Writers' Workshop.

 

Hats Off! to Megan M. Cutter, who announced the release of her new book, Ink in the Wheels: Stories to Make Love Roll, which she co-authored with S. Barton. Ink in the Wheels depicts the journey of an inter-ability married couple as they explore the courage and perseverance to thrive in a relationship. A Valentine’s Day Appreciation Event and Pre-Release Party will be held on Friday, February 8, at the Marbles Kid's Museum in Raleigh.

 

Hats Off! to Ruth Moose, who had a poem in Narrative Arts that was quilted and will hang in the National Institute of Health. She also placed a poem in O'Henry Magazine, Tar River, and a short story in Pine Straw. She has also won a top award in the St. Louis Jung Society competition.

 

Hats Off! to Malaika King Albrecht, whose poetry collection What the Trapeze Artist Trusts (Press 53) was praised by 2013 Oscar Arnold Young Award Final Judge Robert Lee Brewer. He said, “Albrecht invites the reader to join her on the poetic trapeze act she performs” but “is always there, ready to catch the reader before sending her off again.”

 

Hats Off! to Linda Heuring, whose short story, "Betty's Branch," was published in the September issue of 42 Magazine. Also, her short story, "One Chair Away," is in the fall issue of Concho River Review, and her story, "Bordering on Sainthood," is due out in Kestrel 29, which will be shipped to readers next week.

 

Hats Off! to Henry F. Tonn, whose essay-memoir “The French, and Being Odd,” has been accepted by the online lit mag Lowestoft Chronicles, to be published March 1.

 

Hats Off! to Tom Hooker, winner of the 2012 Fountainhead Bookstore Fiction Contest. He will read his winning story, "The Grand Child," on Saturday, January 19 at 5:00 pm at the Fountainhead Bookstore in Hendersonville. A reception will follow.

 

Hats Off! to Rosemary Royston, whose poetry appears in the current issue of Flycatcher: A Journal of Native Imagination. This is the inaugural issue of Flycatcher.

 

Hats Off! to Lookout Books and Edith Pearlman, whose collection, Binocular Vision: New and Selected Stories , was named a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award.

 

Hats Off! to Ross White, who pulled off a Hat Trick in the 2011 Poetry Council of North Carolina Awards. His poem “Babies Hurtling Several Stories” won the Gladys Owings Hughes Heritage Award (free verse); his poem "“Facts about Early America” incorporated rhyming couplets to win the Charles Shull Award (traditional poetry); and his “Address to Monarchs” won the James Larkin Pearson Award (free verse).

 

Hats Off! to poets Alice Osborn and Jane Shlensky, who were both finalists in two award categories in the 2011 Poetry Council of North Carolina Awards. Alice placed Third in the Charles Shull (traditional poetry) category with her poem "Featured Reader," and received an Honorable Mention in the James Larkin Pearson (free verse) category for her poem, "The Lesbians Next Door." Meanwhile, Jane Shlensky placed Third in the Gladys Owings Hughes Heritage category (free verse) for her poem, "The Museum of Broken Things," and received an Honorable Mention in the Ellen Johnston-Hale category (humorous verse) for her poem, "Patience."

 

Hats Off! to four NCWN members who were finalists for the 2011 Oscar Arnold Young Award, sponsored by the Poetry Council of North Carolina. Katherine Soniat won for her book, The Swing Girl. Julie Suk was runner-up with her collection, Lie Down with Me. And honorable mentions went to Susan M. Lefler (Rendering the Bones) and Joanna Catherine Scott (An Innocent in the House of the Dead).

 

Hats Off! to Kim Boykin, whose fiction debut, The Wisdom of Hair, sold to Berkley for publication in the spring of 2013. Her novel tells the story of a young woman who escapes an impoverished background to find her calling "fixing" hair, and along the way discovers what real love is and what it isn't from a quirky community of lovable women.

 

 

Hats Off! to Katherine Soniat, who was named the recipient of this year’s Oscar Arnold Young Award for the best book of poetry from North Carolina for her collection entitled The Swing Girl, published by Louisiana State University Press.

. to Linda Beatrice Brown.  Her novel Black Angels has been honored as one of the Best of the Best Books of the Year 2009 by the Chicago Public Library. The notice reads: “The Chicago Public Library selects books that meet high standards of writing and illustration and that have a significant curriculum link. The Best of the Best list is presented in workshops to hundreds of public and school librarians from across Chicago, distributed to bookstores and put into wide release in the Chicago media.”  Brown is the Willa B. Player Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at Bennett College in Greensboro, NC.  Black Angels is published by Penguin Putnam; you can learn more at www.lindabeatricebrown.com.

Hat's Off to Joey Olschner and his poem, "The Long Horn" which is now online at The Dead Mule. This is his first and only epic which attempts its own Homeric Journey through the Carolina tapestry of time and space. More of his work may be seen and experienced at his blog, http://oceanjoe.wordpress.com/.

... to Bill Griffin.  Kay Byer has kindly listed him as Poet of the Week with excerpts from  Snake
Den Ridge, a bestiary.  Please take a look  at her kind and generous comments .
. .

_http://ncpoetlaureate.blogspot.com/\_ (http://ncpoetlaureate.blogspot.com/

Hats Off! to Maria Elena Alonso-Sierra whose new short-story collection, The Fish Tank: and Other Stories, was featured on the Carried in Waves podcast at the University of Cork, Ireland. The title story, based on the experiences of the Cuban diaspora, was a finalist in 2016.

 

Hats Off! to Gina Malone whose short story "Lullaby" claimed Second Place in the 2016-2017 Ruth Moose Flash Fiction Contest, sponsored by the Charlotte Writers' Club. Gina won $75. The final judge was Bryn Chancellor.

 

 
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