White Cross School Blog

 

NC Literary Hall of Fame

 

 

 

Friday-Sunday
November 21-23
Sheraton Charlotte Hotel
555 S. McDowell St.
Charlotte, NC 28204
704-372-4100

 

When booking your reservation, use this link and the group code "NCWN—Fall Conference" for special conference rates.

 

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/21**

 

FEES AND DEADLINES | COMPLETE SCHEDULE-AT-A-GLANCE | WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS

SESSION I | SESSION II | SESSION III | SESSION IV | SESSION V | MASTER CLASSES | MANUSCRIPT MART | CRITIQUE SERVICE | MARKETING MART | FACULTY BIOGRAPHIES

 

Fees & Deadlines

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/21**

 

Early registration: On-site registration:

Member Rates

  • $250 (full conference, with meals)
  • $200 (full conference, without meals)
  • $200 (Saturday only, with meals)
  • $100 (Sunday only, without meals)

Nonmember Rates

  • $350 (full conference, with meals)
  • $300 (full conference, without meals)
  • $300 (Saturday only, with meals)
  • $200 (Sunday only, without meals)

Other Fees

  • $30 for a Master Class
  • $160 for Manuscript Mart
  • $150 for Critique Service
  • $150 for Marketing Mart
  • $400 (full conference, without meals—for members and nonmembers)
  • $350 (Saturday only, without meals—for members and nonmembers)
  • $250 (Sunday only, without meals—for members and nonmembers)

 

Scholarships

Limited scholarship aid is available for the Fall Conference. To apply, send your current CV and a statement of writing intent—describing your background and goals as a writer—to Ed Southern at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

In addition, the Mary Belle Campbell Scholarships are open to applications from poets who teach full-time.

The NCWN-West Scholarships are open to applications from NCWN members in NetWest counties who need aid to attend the conference. For more information, please e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The deadline for all scholarship applications is October 31.

 

Refunds and Cancellations

Cancellations must be made in writing and arrive at the Network by 5:00 pm on Friday, November 7, 2014, for you to receive a refund of the registration fee, less 25 percent. No-shows or cancellations after November 7 are nonrefundable.

Manuscript Mart, Critique Service, Marketing Mart, and Master Class fees are not refundable if you cancel. However, if we are not able to find a place for you in the Manuscript Mart, Critique Service, or Marketing Mart, we will return your check(s) for related extra charge(s).

Master Class application fees are nonrefundable.

Send all refund requests to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Deadlines

 

October 31

Deadline to reserve hotel rooms at low conference rate*
($119 + taxes and fees/night); please click here or call 704-372-4100 and use the code "NCWN—Fall Conference" to reserve your room)

* Conference-rate rooms subject to limited availability, and will be allocated on first-come, first-served basis.

October 31 Deadline for all scholarship applications (Fees & Deadlines)
November 7 Deadline for Master Class registration (see guidelines)
November 7 Deadline for Manuscript Mart / Critique Service / Marketing Mart registration (see guidelines)
November 14 Deadline for early registration (5:00 pm by phone or mail; midnight if registering online). The first 6 Fall Conference registrants to mention this sentence at the registration table will receive $20 off their next year’s NCWN member dues.
November 21-23 On-site registration available at conference
November 21-23 Fall Conference in session

 

For Writers with Special Needs

The North Carolina Writers' Network strives to make our programs and services accessible to all writers, including those with special needs. If you require conference materials either in large print or in Braille, or if you require a sign-language interpreter, please register for the conference and submit your request to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. no later than October 24. If you require any other special assistance, please let us know as soon as possible at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. We will do our best to accommodate all reasonable requests.

 

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Complete Schedule-At-A-Glance

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/21**

 

Friday, November 21
Sponsored by the Queens University of Charlotte MFA in Creative Writing Program

3:00 – 10:00 pm...........Registration and Book Sales open
5:00 - 9:00 pm..............Exhibitor Tables Open
7:00 – 8:00 pm.............Opening Reception Sponsored by John F. Blair, Publisher

8:00 – 9:00 pm.............Keynote Address by Allan Gurganus
9:00 – 10:00 pm...........Reception and Book Signing

 

Saturday, November 22

7:30 – 9:00 am............Continental Breakfast available
7:30 am – 7:30 pm......Registration Table open
8:00 am - 7:30 pm.......Book Sales and Exhibitor Tables open
8:00 – 9:00 am............Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: "Words in Civic Life" with Amy Bagwell, Robert Inman, Dannye Romine Powell, and Ed Williams Sponsored by the Arts & Science Council

9:00 am – 10:30 am......Workshop Session I

"All Shapes and Sizes: A Workshop on Novel Structure" with Chantel Acevedo**Closed**
“Poetry and Time" with Julie Funderburk
“The Art of the Pitch” with Carin Siegfried and Betsy Thorpe
Poetry Master Class with Morri Creech
Creative Nonfiction Master Class with Cynthia Lewis
Fiction Master Class with Aaron Gwyn
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service/Marketing Mart*

10:30 – 11:00 am...........Break
11:00 am – 12:30 pm.....Workshop Session II

“World-Building” (fiction) with Moira Crone
“Making Their Stories Your Own” with Rebecca McClanahan**Closed**
“Poetry 101” with Anthony S. Abbott
Poetry Master Class with Morri Creech
Creative Nonfiction Master Class with Cynthia Lewis
Fiction Master Class with Aaron Gwyn
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service/Marketing Mart*

12:30 – 1:30 pm.........Luncheon featuring Joseph Bathanti

1:45 – 2:15 pm...........Network Town Hall Meeting
2:15 – 2:30 pm...........Break
2:30 pm – 4:00 pm.....Workshop Session III

“The Comic Touch” with Wilton Barnhardt
“Crafting Your Message: Beginning an Interactive Publicity Campaign” with Priscilla Goudreau-Santos
“The Marrow: Cutting the Fat” (poetry) with Cedric Tillman
Poetry Master Class with Morri Creech
Creative Nonfiction Master Class with Cynthia Lewis
Fiction Master Class with Aaron Gwyn
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service/Marketing Mart*

4:00 – 4:30 pm......Break
4:30 – 5:30 pm......Faculty Readings Sponsored by Charlotte Magazine

6:00 – 7:00 pm......Happy Hour Sponsored by Alice Osborn (AliceOsborn.com): Editor, Mentor, Workshop Leader

7:00 – 8:30 pm......Annual Banquet featuring Wilton Barnhardt Sponsored by the Queens University of Charlotte MFA in Creative Writing Program
8:30 – 9:00 pm......Book Signing
9:00 – 10:00 pm....Open Mic Readings (Sign up at registration table) Sponsored by Al Manning

 

Sunday, November 23

7:30 – 9:00 am.............Continental Breakfast available
7:30 am – 1:00 pm.......Registration Table open
8:00 – 1:00 pm.............Book Sales and Exhibitor Tables open
8:00 – 9:00 am.............Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: "Agents and Editors" with Kristyn Keene, Sally Hill McMillan, Emmanuelle Morgen, and Alice Speilburg

9:00 am – 10:30 am.......Workshop Session IV

“First Impressions in the First Few Pages” with Sarah Creech**Closed**
Panel Discussion: "The Many Paths to Publication" with Kim Boykin, John Hartness, and Karon Luddy
“Where Am I in History? The Poet’s Dilemma” with Alan Michael Parker
“Something to Savor: Telling Your Story with Food and Flavor” with Amy Rogers
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service/Marketing Mart*

10:30 – 11:00 am............Break
11:00 am – 12:30 pm......Workshop Session V

“Structure: Four Ways to Build a Book” with Kim Boykin, Erika Marks, Marybeth Whalen, and Kim Wright
“The Mirror Exercise: Producing a Whole Short Work in Less Than an Hour” with Zelda Lockhart**Closed**
Panel Discussion: "Creating a Poetry Community” with Scott Owens and Jonathan K. Rice
“The Dos and Don'ts of YA Fiction” with A. J. Hartley
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service/Marketing Mart*

12:30 – 1:00 pm.............Closing Conversation & Raffle Prizes

 

*by prior registration only

 

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Workshop Descriptions

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/21**

 

Saturday, November 22

9:00 – 10:30 am: Workshop Session I

All Shapes and Sizes: A Workshop on Novel Structure with Chantel Acevedo**Closed**
Whether you outline, or let the muse take you where she will, every novel must have a thoughtful structure to it. We’ll be discussing the fundamentals of how to structure your novel in this workshop. We’ll talk about scene building, the “tent poles” that hold your novel up, pacing, character motivation and more.

Poetry and Time with Julie Funderburk
An important aspect of the human condition is how we perceive time—it flies, it slows, we remember and forget, we dread and anticipate. Poets have certainly taken time as a subject, but no matter what they’re about, poems can seem magical in the way they suspend a moment or compress experience. In order to inspire us to see new possibilities for our own work, this session will explore some examples to see how poems manage time, including matters of tense, distance, and movement.

The Art of the Pitch with Carin Siegfried and Betsy Thorpe
After years of perfecting your manuscript, now it’s time to think about how you’re going to pitch your work—to agents, editors, publishers, and readers. Learn the secrets of a perfect query letter, and how to engage your reader. Carin Siegfried and Betsy Thorpe spent years as acquiring editors in New York for St. Martin’s and Random House, respectively, reading pitches from agents and authors, and can tell you what made them drop everything to read a manuscript sparked by an amazing pitch.

Poetry Master Class: Formal Poetry with Morri Creech
This class will consider the expressive possibilities of formal poetry, and we will be investigating how meter, rhyme, and fixed forms such as the sonnet and villanelle can help to generate new and exciting work. I will distribute examples, and we will be analyzing the formal properties of works by established authors before writing our own poems. My goal is to have writers leave the workshop with the beginnings of at least one new poem.

Please submit three poems for discussion, no later than November 7; poems should be saved in a single MS Word document, using 12-point Times New Roman font, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. At least one will be talked about in class and, if time permits, more. The workshop will be critically honest and frank, but supportive and encouraging as well.

Creative Nonfiction Master Class: Writing Redux: Revising and Polishing a Nonfiction Draft with Cynthia Lewis
After the initial drafting is complete, a writer may have lost valuable objectivity on the manuscript. The substance of this workshop will be strategies for recovering and sustaining such objectivity on one’s own work once the initial drafting is done. We’ll focus on how to take a draft to the next level, revising and polishing it for publication. We’ll discuss issues large and small—from voice, point of view, narrative arc, organization, scene-setting, and characterization to such concerns of line-editing as eliminating wordiness, achieving stylistic elegance, and correcting grammar. Each participant will submit a portion of a draft that represents one of the following: a lead, a conclusion, a point of crisis or transition—in other words, a crucial passage that can make or break a whole piece. We’ll workshop every submission, attending particularly to how each writer’s choices might affect an audience.

Registrants will be asked to submit up to 1,500 words (including any necessary contextualization) as an email attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by November 7. Submissions should be double-spaced, 12-point Times New Roman, with numbered pages. Registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class.

Fiction Master Class: The Algebra of Narrative with Aaron Gwyn
This course is for serious writers of literary fiction already versed in the fundamentals of technique/craft. We will focus on how Plot functions in short stories and the novel. Aristotle, in The Poetics, lists Plot first in order of importance when describing the various elements of drama. We will look at the primacy of Plot in fiction writing, with an eye to what narratologists call “the grammar of narrative.” We’ll also explore how, as a writer, you can shape plot, and how plot then shapes character, setting, spectacle.

Reading List (to be read before class meets): Larry Brown’s “The End of Romance,” from Facing the Music: Stories; Alice Munro’s “Dimensions,” from Too Much Happiness; Flannery O’Connor’s “A Good Man is Hard to Find,” from A Good Man Is Hard To Find; Ernest Hemingway’s “The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber,” from The Snows Of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories; All the Pretty Horses by Cormac McCarthy; The Son by Philipp Meyer.

Registrants will submit either a short story of 10-20 pages, or the first chapter of a novel-in-progress of comparable length, no later than November 7. Submissions should be saved as MS Word documents, with the title of the piece in the title of the document, and attached to an email sent to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Submissions should be double-spaced, in 12-point Times New Roman. Registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class.

 

11:00 am – 12:30 pm: Workshop Session II

World-Building with Moira Crone
World-Building, a term from speculative and science fiction, means creating an imaginary, alternative setting for a story, which can include history, customs, beliefs, ecology—and conditions contrary to what we encounter in “reality.” An author who switched from realism to speculative fiction with distinguished results talks about developing such an invented world—either slightly divergent from our own, or made up from whole cloth—and writing stories within it. She gives exercises to jumpstart the process.

Making Their Stories Your Own with Rebecca McClanahan**Closed**
Whether you’ve inherited boxes of letters, photos, and documents, or only a few stories passed down to you, this multi-genre workshop will help you begin to shape the raw material of family history into an engaging and artful text. Drawing on her experience in writing essays, poems, and, most recently, The Tribal Knot: A Memoir of Family, Community, and a Century of Change, Rebecca McClanahan discusses the challenges and rewards of family history writing and offers suggestions for the journey. Specific topics include selecting and arranging significant details, fleshing out characters, providing historical or cultural context, employing speculation and reflection, choosing the best structure, and discovering themes and patterns of meaning.

Poetry 101 with Anthony Abbott
Everything you wanted to know about poetry but were afraid to ask (in 90 minutes). We will review the basic elements of poetry---imagery, metaphor, form and free verse, sound and rhythm, and look at some ways these various elements can be combined to make a fresh and moving poem. The instructor will supply examples.

Poetry Master Class with Morri Creech
See Above.

Creative Nonfiction Master Class with Cynthia Lewis
See Above.

Fiction Master Class with Aaron Gwyn
See Above.

 

 

2:30 – 4:00 pm: Workshop Session III

The Comic Touch with Wilton Barnhardt
Of all the many tools not utilized by young writers, I would have to say humor, wit, pleasing cleverness, are some of the less employed. Writers often fear trying to be funny and, worse, imagine it might devalue the seriousness of the book's themes or make their book less "literary." (This sounds like an excuse of someone who fears they will try to be funny and won't be.) Personally, I rarely set out solely to be funny, but it often ends up that way, when the characters' personalities clash and the absurd or satirical works itself up between the cracks. And I've noticed, in revising and rewriting, there are ways to punch up the natural humor of most episodes, even the "serious" ones. Now, not everyone agrees on what's funny (the much praised humor of A Confederacy of Dunces didn't quite work on me, for example) but we can increase our odds by a variety of satiric strategies in which we can hope someone will find some of what we write more funny than not (like any good stand-up comedian). Let's look at some literary examples and talk about how we might lighten up our work and indulge in a little crowd-pleasing.

Crafting Your Message: Beginning an Interactive Publicity Campaign with Priscilla Goudreau-Santos
You’ve worked hard on your book and now it’s time to let people know about it. Get them talking about you with a marketing and publicity campaign that includes press releases, media interviews, social media and more. Since most authors are more comfortable writing their book than marketing it, this workshop will talk about the platforms and techniques that are critical to selling your book. Whether you’re an author with a book being released by a traditional publisher that may not have the resources for publicity, or you’re self-publishing and responsible for your own publicity, this workshop will help you lay the foundation for a successful book launch with your own efforts.

The Marrow: Cutting the Fat with Cedric Tillman
Henry David Thoreau wrote, “I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rout all that was not life . . .” In this workshop, we will discuss how to get at the marrow of our poetry, and consider ways we can “rout” all that isn’t poetry – unless, of course, we wish to make a statement about what poetry can be. Specifically, we’ll discuss wordiness, the utility of reading your work aloud, and the extent to which word choice can (or ought to) be affected by prospective audiences. Participants are encouraged to bring in work they'd like to discuss with the workshop.

Poetry Master Class with Morri Creech
See Above.

Creative Nonfiction Master Class with Cynthia Lewis
See Above.

Fiction Master Class with Aaron Gwyn
See Above.

 

Sunday, November 23

9:00 – 10:30 am: Workshop Session IV

First Impressions in the First Few Pages with Sarah Creech**Closed**
The famed writers of the Toy Story movies, creators of the endearing toy Woody, knew they wanted his character to end at a place of selflessness. To do so, they thought he needed to start from a place of pure selfishness. The only problem? The audience couldn’t connect with Woody. He had to be rewritten and made into the character we find in the Pixar films today. The beginning of any short story or novel (or screenplay) requires that the audience care about the main character. Characters don’t have to be lovable, but their problems must feel real, with a need for a solution. How do writers create characters an audience cares about? In this workshop, participants will review examples of how professional fiction writers pull this off in the first few pages of a novel or short story. Participants will have an in-class writing exercise to practice creating characters that connect with an audience in the first few pages.

Panel Discussion: The Many Paths to Publication with Kim Boykin, John Hartness, and Karon Luddy
Traditional or Indie, Big 5 or Small Press, Digital or Print: writers have never had more possible, viable paths to publication to choose from, which can make choosing harder than ever before. This panel discussion will feature three authors who have followed more than one of those paths, and can tell you what they discovered along the way.

Where Am I in History? The Poet’s Dilemma with Alan Michael Parker
In this workshop, we will look at the enormity of the past in relation to our own ambitions. Where do I go? Where do my poems fit? What shall I do about my influences? Please bring a writing utensil and paper.

Something to Savor: Telling Your Story with Food and Flavor with Amy Rogers
“Food is our common ground, a universal experience,” chef James Beard once said. Whether you’re an aspiring author or a proficient writer looking to add spice to your work, this workshop will show how to use your tastes, observations, and remembrances of food as powerful tools to engage your senses and deepen your writing.

 

11:00 am – 12:30 pm: Workshop Session V

Structure: Four Ways to Build a Book with Kim Boykin, Erika Marks, Marybeth Whalen, and Kim Wright
Structure: It's hard to talk about and therefore many writers avoid the scary subject, even though a sound structure is essential to the success of any novel. On this panel, four writers will share their own unique ways of building a book, from being a “pantser” (who flies by the seat of her pants) to a “plotter” who won't begin without a detailed outline, to all the possibilities between these two extremes. We'll also discuss the issues of whether each book demands its own structure, the challenge of revision, writing when you aren't sure what happens next, and whether or not the "film formula" really works when it comes to novels. You'll leave with a new set of tools to help you find the best structural approach to your next book.

The Mirror Exercise: Producing a Whole Short Work in Less Than an Hour with Zelda Lockhart**Closed**
In this workshop, participants produce raw material from “The Mirror Exercise,” which is a segment of Zelda’s forthcoming book, The Soul of the Full-Length Manuscript. The four short prompts of this exercise help participants produce a whole short piece of fiction, memoir or poetry during the workshop. This includes a quick training on how to get in the creative zone quickly and access your best work. This workshop teaches invaluable skills for maintaining daily writing while leading a very busy life.

Panel Discussion: Creating a Poetry Community with Scott Owens and Jonathan K. Rice
As romantic (and Romantic) as the image of the solitary poet may be, the reality is that most poets need to be part of a community. A poetry community can help its members hone their craft, find their muse, take advantage of opportunities, and overcome the discouragements that all writers face. Scott Owens and Jonathan K. Rice have spent years building poetry communities through magazines, readings, open mics, and more. They will talk about their experiences, answer your questions, and share tips on how to come together with your fellow poets.

The Dos and Don'ts of YA Fiction with A. J. Hartley
What exactly is Young Adult fiction? How is it different from Middle Grades, New Adult or Adult Crossover? What should you bear in mind if you are trying to write it? This workshop will explore some of the issues of form and content connected to the conception, execution, sale and marketing of novels aimed at younger readers. Time will be set aside for discussion of any pertinent issues raised by workshop members..

 

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Master Classes

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/21**

 

Master Classes offer intermediate and advanced writers a chance to delve more deeply into a particular genre. Each Master Class will take place over the course of Sessions I, II, and III, and will be limited to the first sixteen qualified registrants.

Poetry Master Class: Formal Poetry with Morri Creech
This class will consider the expressive possibilities of formal poetry, and we will be investigating how meter, rhyme, and fixed forms such as the sonnet and villanelle can help to generate new and exciting work. I will distribute examples, and we will be analyzing the formal properties of works by established authors before writing our own poems. My goal is to have writers leave the workshop with the beginnings of at least one new poem.

Please submit three poems for discussion, no later than November 7; poems should be saved in a single MS Word document, using 12-point Times New Roman font, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. At least one will be talked about in class and, if time permits, more. The workshop will be critically honest and frank, but supportive and encouraging as well.

Creative Nonfiction Master Class: Writing Redux: Revising and Polishing a Nonfiction Draft with Cynthia Lewis
After the initial drafting is complete, a writer may have lost valuable objectivity on the manuscript. The substance of this workshop will be strategies for recovering and sustaining such objectivity on one’s own work once the initial drafting is done. We’ll focus on how to take a draft to the next level, revising and polishing it for publication. We’ll discuss issues large and small—from voice, point of view, narrative arc, organization, scene-setting, and characterization to such concerns of line-editing as eliminating wordiness, achieving stylistic elegance, and correcting grammar. Each participant will submit a portion of a draft that represents one of the following: a lead, a conclusion, a point of crisis or transition—in other words, a crucial passage that can make or break a whole piece. We’ll workshop every submission, attending particularly to how each writer’s choices might affect an audience.

Registrants will be asked to submit up to 1,500 words (including any necessary contextualization) as an email attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by November 7. Submissions should be double-spaced, 12-point Times New Roman, with numbered pages. Registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class.

Fiction Master Class: The Algebra of Narrative with Aaron Gwyn
This course is for serious writers of literary fiction already versed in the fundamentals of technique/craft. We will focus on how Plot functions in short stories and the novel. Aristotle, in The Poetics, lists Plot first in order of importance when describing the various elements of drama. We will look at the primacy of Plot in fiction writing, with an eye to what narratologists call “the grammar of narrative.” We’ll also explore how, as a writer, you can shape plot, and how plot then shapes character, setting, spectacle.

Reading List (to be read before class meets): Larry Brown’s “The End of Romance,” from Facing the Music: Stories; Alice Munro’s “Dimensions,” from Too Much Happiness; Flannery O’Connor’s “A Good Man is Hard to Find,” from A Good Man Is Hard To Find; Ernest Hemingway’s “The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber,” from The Snows Of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories; All the Pretty Horses by Cormac McCarthy; The Son by Philipp Meyer.

Registrants will submit either a short story of 10-20 pages, or the first chapter of a novel-in-progress of comparable length, no later than November 7. Submissions should be saved as MS Word documents, with the title of the piece in the title of the document, and attached to an email sent to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Submissions should be double-spaced, in 12-point Times New Roman. Registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class.

 

Admissions

While publication credits are not required, Master Class participants should be experienced writers. Each Master Class will be limited to the first sixteen qualified registrants.

Please print and fill out the Master Class Cover Sheet, along with a brief cover letter, summarizing your writing background and highlighting publication credits (if applicable); and a check for your $30 nonrefundable processing fee, and mail these materials to:

NCWN FC14 Master Class
P.O. Box 21591
Winston-Salem, NC 27120

MASTER CLASS REGISTRATIONS (INCLUDING REQUIRED MANUSCRIPTS) MUST BE RECEIVED BY FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7.

When you register for a Master Class, please choose another class as a back-up in case you are not admitted to the Master Class.

 

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Manuscript Mart

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/21**

 

Manuscript Mart provides writers with the opportunity to pitch their manuscripts and get feedback from an editor or agent with a leading publisher or literary agency. A one-on-one, thirty-minute pitch and Q&A session will be scheduled for you, to take place on Saturday, November 22, sometime between 9:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M., or on Sunday, November 23, between 9:00 A.M. and 12:30 P.M.

Please note, a Manuscript Mart session can lead directly to publication—but don't expect it to do so. Think of it, instead, as a learning opportunity, and you'll get more out of it.

Manuscript Mart sessions are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. YOUR MANUSCRIPT MART REGISTRATION, WITH MANUSCRIPT AND PAYMENT ENCLOSED, MUST REACH THE NETWORK BY FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7.

 

Guidelines

  • Submit a one-page query letter and 20 double-spaced, single-sided, sequential pages of your fiction or nonfiction manuscript. Make sure your name is on each page of your submission. NUMBER YOUR PAGES.
  • All submissions must be double-spaced with twelve-point Times New Roman font on 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper with one-inch margins.
  • You must be registered for the conference for your Manuscript Mart session to be scheduled.
  • Download and print the Manuscript Mart cover sheet, which you may also download from the online Registration Form at www.ncwriters.org. Mail it with two hard copies of your submission to:

North Carolina Writers’ Network
Fall Conference Manuscript Mart
PO Box 21591
Winston-Salem, NC 27120

Checklist:

  • two copies of manuscript and query
  • Manuscript Mart cover sheet;
  • Check to cover Manuscript Mart ($160);
  • A separate check to cover all other conference fees, if you are registering for the conference through the mail.

 

NOTE: If Manuscript Mart fills, your check will be returned to you.

 

Manuscript Mart Reviewers

From the names below, select your first, second, and third choice on your registration form. We will try to accommodate your first choice; if we cannot, we will select an appropriate editor or agent for you. The name of your assigned agent or editor, as well as the time and location of your session, will be included in the packet you will receive at the conference registration table.

Kristyn Keene, ICM
Sally Hill McMillan, McMillan & Associates
Emmanuelle Morgen, Stonesong
Alice Speilburg, Speilburg Literary Agency

 

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Critique Service

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/21**

 

The Critique Service provides writers with in-depth literary critique of fiction, nonfiction, or poetry a seasoned writer or editor. A one-on-one, thirty-minute review session will be scheduled for you, to take place on Saturday, November 22, sometime between 9:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M., or on Sunday, November 23, between 9:00 A.M. and 12:30 P.M.

Critiques are scheduled on a first-come, first-served basis. YOUR CRITIQUE SERVICE REGISTRATION, WITH MANUSCRIPT AND PAYMENT ENCLOSED, MUST REACH THE NETWORK BY FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7.

 

Guidelines

  • Submit 20 double-spaced, single-sided, sequential pages of your fiction or nonfiction manuscript (for book-length projects, you must include a one-page synopsis of the work as a whole, in addition to the 20 pages), or 10 pages of poetry. Make sure your name is on each page of your submission. NUMBER YOUR PAGES.
  • Prose submissions must be double-spaced in 12-point Times New Roman font, printed on one side of 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper with one-inch margins;
  • Poetry submissions must be single-spaced, in twelve-point Times New Roman font, printed on one side only of 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper, with one-inch margins, and should include no more than one poem per page.
  • Download and print the Critique Service cover sheet, which you may also download from the online Registration Form at www.ncwriters.org. Mail it with two hard copies of your submission to:

North Carolina Writers’ Network
Fall Conference Critique Service
PO Box 21591
Winston-Salem, NC 27120

Checklist:

  • Two copies of manuscript and synopsis, if appropriate;
  • Critique Service cover sheet;
  • Check to cover Critique Service ($150);
  • A separate check to cover all other conference fees if you are registering for the conference through the mail.

 

NOTE: If Critique Service fills, your check will be returned to you.

 

Critiquers

From the names below, select your first, second, and third choice. We will try to accommodate your first choice; if we cannot, we will select an appropriate critiquer for you. The name of your assigned critiquer, as well as the time and location of your session, will be included in the packet you will receive at the conference registration table.

Lisa Williams Kline, fiction/children’s
Carin Siegfried, fiction/creative nonfiction
Betsy Thorpe, fiction/creative nonfiction
Jessie Carty, poetry

 

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Marketing Mart

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/21**

 

Marketing Mart provides writers with an opportunity to create or refine an effective plan to pitch, promote, and sell their current, upcoming, or proposed books. The Network will schedule you a one-on-one, thirty-minute session with a publishing or bookselling professional, to take place sometime between 9:00 A.M. and 4:30 P.M. on Saturday, November 22, or between 9:00 A.M. and 12:30 P.M. on Sunday, November 23.

Marketing Mart sessions will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. YOUR MARKETING MART REGISTRATION, WITH MATERIALS AND PAYMENT ENCLOSED, MUST REACH THE NETWORK BY FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7.

 

Guidelines

  • Registrants must submit the following:
    • A one-page synopsis of their book or manuscript
    • A one-page bio or CV of themselves
    • The first three pages of their book or manuscript
    • A check or money order, made payable to NC Writers’ Network, for $150
  • Note: If Marketing Mart fills, your check will be returned to you.
  • All submissions must be double-spaced, in twelve-point Times New Roman font, printed on one side only of 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper, with one-inch margins.
  • You must register for the Fall Conference to have a Marketing Mart session scheduled.
  • Download and print the Marketing Mart cover sheet, which you may also download from the online Registration Form at www.ncwriters.org. Mail it with two hard copies of your submission to:

North Carolina Writers’ Network
Fall Conference Marketing Mart
PO Box 21591
Winston-Salem, NC 27120

 

Marketing Mart Reviewers

From the names below, select your first and second choice. We will try to accommodate your first choice; if we cannot, we will select an appropriate reviewer for you. The name of your assigned reviewer, as well as the time and location of your session, will be included in the packet you will receive at the conference registration table.

Cindy Campbell
Amy Rogers

 

 

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Faculty Biographies

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/21**

 

 

Anthony S. Abbott is Professor Emeritus of English at Davidson College. He is the author of two novels and seven collections of poetry, the most recent of which, The Angel Dialogues, was published by Lorimer Press in March of this year. His 2011 collection, If Words Could Save Us, was the co-winner of the Brockman Campbell Award of the N. C. Poetry Society. His 2003 novel, Leaving Maggie Hope, won the Novello Award. He taught English and creative writing at Davidson for nearly forty years, and was chair of the department from 1989 to 1996. He also served as President of the NC Writers’ Network, The Charlotte Writers Club, and, most recently, the NC Poetry Society. He teaches writing workshops in Charlotte, Davidson, and Winston-Salem.

Chantel Acevedo has received many awards for her fiction, including the Latino International Book Award and an Alabama State Council on the Arts Literature Fellowship. A Cuban-American born and raised in Miami, Florida, Acevedo has spent time in Japan and New Zealand as a Fulbrighter, and currently resides in Auburn, Alabama, where she teaches at Auburn University. She is the editor of the Southern Humanities Review, the founder of the annual Auburn Writers Conference, and the author of two additional novels, Love and Ghost Letters (St. Martin’s Press) and A Falling Star (Carolina Wren Press), as well as a novel for young adults, Song of the Red Cloak. A new novel, The Distant Marvels, is forthcoming from Europa Editions.

Amy Bagwell's poems are in the anthologies Topograph: New Writing from the Carolinas and the Landscape Beyond and Boomtown: Explosive Writing from Ten Years of the Queens University MFA Program and the journal Figdust. A graduate of the Queens MFA program, she teaches English at Central Piedmont Community College and directs the Wall Poems of Charlotte, a project bringing poems by North Carolina writers to the outsides of buildings and other public spaces. This project just completed its ninth installation and is a recipient of a 2014 public art grant from Charlotte's Arts & Science Council.

Wilton Barnhardt, a native of Winston-Salem, has had a variety of careers: bartender, theater reviewer, motor sports reporter at Sports Illustrated, journalist, and academic. He went to Michigan State University and Oxford University (Brasenose College) for his bachelor’s and master’s degrees. While he was overseas he finished his first novel, Emma Who Saved My Life (1989); traveled widely for his second novel, Gospel (1993); was lured to Hollywood by the prospect of turning the first book into a movie, during which he wrote Show World (1998); and—after an inexcusably long break occasioned by directing the MFA program in Creative Writing at NC State University—returned to publishing with the New York Times bestseller Lookaway, Lookaway (2013), a novel set entirely in North Carolina, now optioned by HBO for a potential series. Both Slate.com and Kirkus Review picked it as one of their Books of the Year. He next hopes to publish a collection of his short stories (Somewhere Safe to Sea); his next novel (already begun) involves the financial world and is set in Europe. He lives in Raleigh.

Joseph Bathanti is the former Poet Laureate of North Carolina. He is the author of eight books of poetry: Communion Partners, Anson County, The Feast of All Saints, This Metal (nominated for the National Book Award), Land of Amnesia, Restoring Sacred Art (winner of the 2010 Roanoke Chowan Prize), Sonnets of the Cross, and a new collection, Concertina, from Mercer University Press. His novel, East Liberty, won the 2001 Carolina Novel Award. His latest novel, Coventry, won the 2006 Novello Literary Award. His book of stories, The High Heart, won the 2006 Spokane Prize. His new novel, The Life of the World to Come, is forthcoming in late 2014 from University of South Carolina Press. His collection of personal essays, Half of What I Say Is Meaningless, winner of the 2012 Will D. Campbell Award for Creative Nonfiction, was just released by Mercer University Press. He is the recipient of Literature Fellowships from the North Carolina Arts Council in 1994 (poetry) and 2009 (fiction); the Samuel Talmadge Ragan Award, presented annually for outstanding contributions to the Fine Arts of North Carolina over an extended period; the Linda Flowers Prize; the Sherwood Anderson Award; the Barbara Mandigo Kelly Peace Poetry Prize; the 2011 Donald Murray Prize; the 2012 Ragan-Rubin Award; the 2013 Mary Frances Hobson Prize; the 2014 Irene Blair Honeycutt Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Literary Arts, the 2014 Rita Dove Award in Poetry, from The Center for Women Writers at Salem College; and others. Bathanti is Professor of Creative Writing at Appalachian State University.

Kim Boykin lives in Charlotte and has a heart for hairstylists, librarians, and book junkies like herself. Almost everything she learned about writing, she learned from her grandpa, who was a master teacher of pacing and sensory detail. He held court under an old mimosa tree on the family farm, telling stories about growing up in rural Georgia and sharing his unique take on the world. As a stay-at-home mom, Kim started writing, grabbing snippets of time in the car-rider line or on the bleachers at swim practice. After her kids left the nest, she sold her first novel at 53, and has been writing like crazy ever since. Her Penguin WF titles are The Wisdom of Hair and Palmetto Moon. She loves writing romance for the Tule Publishing Group. She and Erika Marks write the “Magnolia Bay” series for Tule, and Kim writes her own Tule series, “Island Bliss.”

Cindy Campbell began her career selling advertising for Lake Norman Magazine, which she helped to establish with her sister Donna Campbell. After a good run in the booming resort community north of Charlotte, Cindy headed for the Big Apple where she worked for Harcourt Brace Jovanovich in regional sales. She eventually moved back to North Carolina, but she continued to travel the country working for Penton Media, the publisher of a wide range of national specialty magazines. She finished her advertising career as southeastern district manager for Hanley Wood publications in Washington, DC. She opened up Cindy Campbell PR (www.cindycampbellpr.com) in 2012 and now works with some of the finest writers and musicians in the south.

Jessie Carty's poetry, fiction, and nonfiction have appeared in publications such as Iodine Poetry Journal, decomP, and Connotation Press. She is the author of seven poetry collections including An Amateur Marriage (Finishing Line, 2012) which was a finalist for the 2011 Robert Watson Poetry Award as well as her most recent full length collection Practicing Disaster (Aldrich, 2014). Her poem “Perhaps He Scrapbooks” won 1st Place in the 2013 Kakalak Poetry Contest and appears in the most recent edition of the Kakalak anthology. Jessie received a BA in English from UNC-Greensboro and an MFA in Poetry from Queens University of Charlotte. Jessie works as a freelance editor, writer, and teacher, and is an adjunct lecturer in the UNC-Charlotte’s First-Year Writing Program. You can find Jessie around the web but most often she is blogging at http://jessiecarty.wordpress.com.

Morri Creech

Morri Creech is the author of three collections of poetry, Paper Cathedrals (Kent State University Press, 2001), Field Knowledge (Waywiser, 2006), and The Sleep of Reason (Waywiser, 2013), which was a finalist for the 2014 Pulitzer Prize. A recipient of NEA and Ruth Lilly Fellowships, as well as grants from the North Carolina and Louisana Arts Councils, he is the Writer-in-Residence at Queens University of Charlotte.

Born and raised in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Sarah Creech grew up in a house full of women who told stories about black cloud visions and other premonitions. Her work has appeared in storySouth, Literary Mama, Aroostook Review, Glass, and as a finalist for Glimmer Train. She received an MFA from McNeese State University in 2008 and now teaches English and creative writing at Queens University of Charlotte. She currently lives in North Carolina with her two children and her husband, a poet. Season of the Dragonflies is her first novel.

Moira Crone, whose works have appeared in The New Yorker, Oxford American, and Fiction, is the award-winning author of six books, including her newest novel The Ice Garden. Her previous book, The Not Yet, was a finalist for the Philip K. Dick Award for best science fiction paperback of the year in 2013. In 2009, she received the Robert Penn Warren Award from the Southern Fellowship of Writers for the body of her work. www.moiracrone.com.

Julie Funderburk is poetry editor of storySouth. Her poetry appears in Ploughshares, Best New Poets, Blackbird, Hayden’s Ferry Review, The Cincinnati Review, and elsewhere, and her chapbook collection Thoughts to Fold into Birds was released this year from Unicorn Press. The recipient of scholarships from the Bread Loaf and Sewanee writers’ conferences, she serves on the Board of Trustees for the North Carolina Writers’ Network. She teaches at Queens University of Charlotte, where she also directs The Arts at Queens.

Priscilla Goudreau-Santos is a publicist and marketing specialist who specializes in promoting authors and their books. She’s a Jacksonville, FL, native and University of Florida graduate (Go Gators!) and served as assistant public relations director for a major hospital, as marketing director for a regional commercial real estate firm, and as news reporter for The Florida Times-Union before beginning her own firm in 1996. She moved to Charlotte a year and a half ago and loves being part of the vibrant book community. She is the new WNBA-Charlotte Publicity Chair. Priscilla is also a writer. That’s what inspired her to begin her business and to work with authors. Her articles have appeared in numerous local and regional publications and one day she hopes to pen a novel.

Allan Gurganus was born on June 11, 1947, in Rocky Mount, North Carolina. His mother was a school teacher and his father a businessman. Gurganus is the author of Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All (Sue Kaufman Prize from the American Academy), White People (Los Angeles Times Book Prize, Pen-Faulkner Finalist), Plays Well with Others, The Practical Heart: Four Novellas (Lambda Literary Award) and 2013’s Local Souls. His stories have won the National Magazine Prize and have been honored in Best American Stories, The O’Henry Prize Collection, and The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction.

His editorials appear in The New York Times. A recent essay was published in the New York Review of Books. Gurganus’ leftward politics have made him a commentator on the Lehrer News Hour and NPR’s All Things Considered. He was featured in the PBS American Masters series as a scholar-reader for “Walt Whitman, An American.” Gurganus wrote and narrated the original script “A House Divided: Poetry of the American Civil War” for BBC 4. The CBS version of Widow won four Emmys. Gurganus was a recent John Simon Guggenheim Fellow, is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and has taught literature and writing at Duke, The Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Stanford University, and Sarah Lawrence College.

As widely read abroad as in his native country, Gurganus’ work has been translated into sixteen languages. His short novel Decoy will be published during the winter of 2014 by Liveright. Gurganus’ novel-in-progress, a companion piece to Widow, is The Erotic History of a Country Baptist Church.

Of his last book, The New York Times said, “If there remained any doubt of Allan Gurganus’ literary greatness, Local Souls should put that to rest forever.”

John Cheever wrote, “I consider Allan Gurganus the most technically gifted and morally responsive writer of his generation.”

Aaron Gwyn was raised on a cattle ranch in rural Oklahoma. He is the author of a story collection, Dog on the Cross (Algonquin Books, 2004, finalist for the 2005 New York Public Library Young Lions Fiction Award), and two novels, The World Beneath (W.W. Norton, 2004), and Wynne’s War (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014). His short stories have appeared in Esquire, McSweeney’s, Glimmer Train, Virginia Quarterly Review, Gettysburg Review, New Stories from the South, and other magazines and anthologies. His narrative nonfiction, journalism, and articles have appeared in Esquire, Esquire.com, NPR.com, The Huffington Post, The Missouri Review, Crazyhorse, and anthologies from Creative Nonfiction. He lives in Charlotte, writes for Esquire magazine, and is an associate professor of English at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte where he teaches fiction writing and contemporary American fiction.

A. J. Hartley is the international bestselling author of 10 novels including the archaeological thrillers The Mask of Atreus and Tears of the Jaguar, the Darwen Arkwright children’s series, the Will Hawthorne fantasy adventure series, and Macbeth, a Novel. He is also the Robinson Professor of Shakespeare at UNC Charlotte.

John G. Hartness is a teller of tales, righter of wrongs, and some call him the Pompetus of Love. Okay, maybe he’s an urban fantasy and horror author from Charlotte with a background in theatre and a love for fried pickles and loud music. John is the author of The Black Knight Chronicles from Bell Bridge Books, available wherever books or e-books are sold. He’s also the creator of the comedic horror icon Bubba the Monster Hunter, and the short stories that bear his name. John is an award-winning poet, lighting designer and theatre producer, whose work has been translated into over 25 languages and read worldwide. He’s been published in several online literary journals including The Dead Mule School of Southern Literature, cc&d, Deuce Coupe, and Truckin’. His poem “Dancing with Fireflies” was nominated for a 2010 Pushcart Prize. John is also the host of the YouTube series Literate Liquors, where he pairs fantasy and science fiction novels with the appropriate alcohol. He can be found online at www.johnhartness.com and spends too much time on Twitter (@johnhartness), especially after a few drinks.

Novelist, playwright and screenwriter Robert Inman is a native of Elba, Alabama, and a graduate of The University of Alabama with Bachelor of Arts and Master of Fine Arts (Creative Writing) degrees. He is the author of five novels: The Governor’s Lady (2013), Home Fires Burning (1987), Old Dogs and Children (1991), Dairy Queen Days (1997), and Captain Saturday (2002). He is also the author Coming Home: Life, Love and All Things Southern (2000) and The Christmas Bus (2009). Inman has written screenplays for six motion pictures for television, two of which have been “Hallmark Hall of Fame” presentations. One of those, The Summer of Ben Tyler, won the Writers’ Guild of America Award as the best original television screenplay of 1997. He is also the author of eight stage plays, the most recent of which is Liberty Mountain, a drama about the Revolutionary War Battle of Kings Mountain, which premiers in October, 2014, in Kings Mountain, NC.

Kristyn Keene has been at International Creative Management since 2006, building a list of literary and commercial fiction, narrative nonfiction, memoir, young adult, pop culture, and humor. She is a graduate of the Columbia Publishing Course and holds a degree in English and writing from the University of California at Santa Barbara.

Lisa Williams Kline is the author of eight novels for young people, including Eleanor Hill, winner of the North Carolina Juvenile Literature Award; Write Before Your Eyes, from Delacorte Press; and the "Sisters in All Seasons" series from Zondervan. She has an MFA from Queens University, and in addition to offering individual manuscript critiques through her website (www.lisawilliamskline.com), she teaches and offers manuscript critiques through Writer's Digest.

Cynthia Lewis has been teaching Shakespeare, Renaissance literature, and creative nonfiction at Davidson College since 1980. Her reported essays concern American culture, including such topics as American women bodybuilders, spousal murder, professional gambling in Las Vegas, women’s obsession with shoes, and the world of Southern debutantes. Her nonfiction has been published in Southern Cultures, The Antioch Review, The Massachusetts Review, Shenandoah, Charlotte Magazine, and elsewhere. Three of her personal essays have been included by the editor of The Best American Essays on the “Notable Essays” list and another has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She is currently finishing a book about sports and Shakespeare.

Zelda Lockhart’s poetry can be found in Obsidian Journal, a publication of North Carolina State University; Calyx: A Journal of Women’s Art and Literature, and the North Carolina Literary Review, among others. She is the award-winning author of the novels Fifth Born, Cold Running Creek, and Fifth Born II: The Hundredth Turtle. She was the Piedmont Laureate for North Carolina’s Triangle region, won a Barnes & Noble Discovery Award, and was finalist for both a Hurston/Wright Award and a Lambda Literary Award. She lives in Hillsborough on the 3.5 acres of land that she recently converted into LaVenson Press Studios, which offers a series of workshops, hosts a literary magazine, and feeds participants from its organic garden. Visit the Studio’s website, www.LaVensonPressStudios.com, or Zelda’s website at www.zeldalockhart.com.

Karon Luddy grew up in Lancaster, SC, and lives in Charlotte with her husband Tom. She is the author of the award-winning novel Spelldown published by Simon and Schuster and Wolf Heart, a book of poetry, published by Clemson University Press. In 2005, she received her MFA in Creative Writing from Queens University and became an adjunct professor at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte where she teaches writing intensive classes in the American Studies Department. In 2014, Luddy's passion for writers, readers, and literature inspired her to create Backbone Books. The debut title of this new imprint, Bewilderment of Boys, was published in June. It is also the sequel to Spelldown, Luddy's first novel.

Erika Marks is a native New Englander who now makes her home in Charlotte with her husband and two children. On the winding road to publishing, she has worked as an illustrator, an art director, a cake decorator, and a carpenter--but writing has always been her greatest passion. She is the author of The Guest House, The Mermaid Collector, Little Gale Gumbo, and It Comes in Waves, all published by NAL/Penguin. Her love of the sea keeps her stories tied to the shore, as well as her love for stories of the heart. You can reach her directly at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Rebecca McClanahan’s tenth book is The Tribal Knot: A Memoir of Family, Community, and a Century of Change. She has also published five books of poetry, three books of writing instruction, and The Riddle Song and Other Rememberings, winner of the Glasgow Award in nonfiction. Her work has appeared in Best American Essays, Best American Poetry, The Georgia Review, The Kenyon Review, The Gettysburg Review, The Sun, and numerous anthologies. Recipient of the Wood Prize from Poetry Magazine, a Pushcart Prize, the Carter Prize for the Essay, and literary fellowships from New York Foundation for the Arts and the North Carolina Arts Council, McClanahan teaches in the MFA programs of Queens University and Rainier Writing Workshop, and has been appointed the 2015 Writer-in-Residence at Hollins University.

Sally McMillan is a literary agent based in Charlotte. She represents a wide range of adult fiction and nonfiction. She formerly owned and operated a publishing company, starting her agency in 1990 after selling it. Sally lives in Charlotte with her husband and has two adult daughters.

Emmanuelle Morgen joined Stonesong as an agent in 2011. Previously she worked with Judith Ehrlich Literary Management, Wendy Sherman Associates, and at Random House. She represents a wide variety of adult and children’s fiction, as well as memoir and select narrative and prescriptive nonfiction projects. In children’s books, she represents primarily YA, such as Kat Zhang’s What’s Left of Me (HarperTeen), and Georg Rauch’s YA memoir, Unlikely Warrior (FSG Children’s). In adult books, she represents general fiction, women’s fiction, romance, historical fiction, and mystery.

Originally from Greenwood, SC, Scott Owens holds degrees from Ohio University, UNC Charlotte, and UNC Greensboro. He currently lives in Hickory, where he teaches at Catawba Valley Community College, edits Wild Goose Poetry Review, owns and operates Taste Full Beans Coffeehouse and Gallery, and serves as vice-president of the NC Poetry Society, Regional Representative of NCWN, and Coordinator of Poetry Hickory. His 12th book of poetry, To, is scheduled for release by Main Street Rag in early November. His work has received awards from the Academy of American Poets, the Pushcart Prize Anthology, the Next Generation/Indie Lit Awards, the NC Writers' Network, the NC Poetry Society, and the Poetry Society of SC.

Alan Michael Parker is the author of eight collections of poems, including his most recent, Long Division, which won the 2012 North Carolina Book Award. He has received numerous awards and fellowships, including three Pushcart Prizes, the Fineline Prize from the Mid-American Review, the 2013 and 2014 Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition Awards, and the Lucille Medwick Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America. His 2011 novel, Whale Man, was shortlisted for the 2011 ForeWord Reviews' "Book of the Year Award" in the category of Literary Fiction. He is also the author of the novels Cry Uncle and The Committee on Town Happiness. Since 1998, he has taught at Davidson College, where he was promoted to the rank of Full Professor in 2007; in 2012, he was named Douglas C. Houchens Professor of English. He also teaches in the University of Tampa Low-Residency MFA. program, where he works with graduate student writers in both poetry and fiction. He lives in Davidson with his wife, the artist Felicia van Bork, and her Pecha Kucha alter ego, Candi Parker.

Dannye Romine Powell is the book columnist for the Charlotte Observer and is the author of three collections of poetry from the University of Arkansas Press, two of which have won the Brockman-Campbell Award for the best book of poetry by a North Carolinian in the preceding year. She’s won fellowships from the NEA and the North Carolina Arts Council, and her poetry has appeared in numerous literary journals, including Poetry, Ploughshares, The New Republic, Field, and The Paris Review. She is also the author of Parting the Curtains: Interviews with Southern Writers, which includes interviews on the creative process with Maya Angelou, James Dickey, William Styron, Lee Smith, Walker Percy and Eudora Welty.

Jonathan K. Rice is founding editor and publisher of Iodine Poetry Journal, which is in its fifteenth year of publication. In 2002 he co-edited the chapbook, Celebrating Life, a project funded by Barnes & Noble in celebration of National Poetry Month and in memory of Dorothy Perry Thompson, noted poet and instructor at Winthrop University. He is the author of a chapbook, Shooting Pool With a Cellist (Main Street Rag, 2003) and a full-length collection, Ukulele and Other Poems (Main Street Rag, 2006). His poetry has also appeared in numerous publications and he has been a longtime host of poetry readings in Charlotte, where he lives with his family. In 2012 he received the Irene Blair Honeycutt Legacy Award for outstanding service in support of local and regional writers, awarded by Central Piedmont Community College.

Amy Rogers has written for more than a dozen years for National Public Radio station WFAE in Charlotte, where she is contributing editor for the station’s online food magazine, WFAEats: All Things Food and Culture. She has authored three cookbooks, including Hungry for Home: Stories of Food from Across the Carolinas. Her work was included in Cornbread Nation 1: The Best of Southern Food Writing and many other publications regionally and nationally. Rogers was born in the Midwest, raised in New York and Florida, and now lives in Charlotte, where she considers herself “Southern by choice.”

Carin Siegfried has been in the book business for 20 years, since starting work in the Davidson College library. She was an editor for Thomas Dunne Books at St. Martin’s Press in New York for five years, acquiring 25 books, including a New York Times bestseller, a Kelly Ripa Book Club selection, and a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection. In addition, she worked on more than 100 books on behalf of Tom Dunne, including numerous bestsellers and award winners. More recently she was the New England independent bookstore sales rep, and then a national account manager, for book wholesaler Baker & Taylor. In 2009 she founded the Charlotte chapter of the Women’s National Book Association and she is currently President of the national WNBA. She runs her own editorial service, Carin Siegfried Editorial, where she enjoys helping writers make their books the very best. She is the author of The Insider's Guide to a Career in Book Publishing (6/2014, Chickadee Books), a book explaining the ins and outs of the publishing industry for young adults wanting to break into the field.

Alice Speilburg is a literary agent at Speilburg Literary Agency and has worked in publishing since 2008. She is a member of Romance Writers of America, Mystery Writers of America, and Society of Children’s Book Authors and Illustrators. Alice is currently building her client list and is looking for books in the following categories: Literary Fiction, Historical Fiction, Mystery, Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Thriller/Suspense, Middle-Grade, Young Adult, Biography, Food, Gender Issues, Health, History, Literary Journalism, Music, Pop Culture, Relationships, Science, and Travel. http://speilburgliterary.com.

Betsy Thorpe has been in the book business for 20 years, working in the adult trade departments as a developmental and acquisitions editor at Atheneum, HarperCollins, Broadway Doubleday, Macmillan, and John Wiley & Sons. Since leaving New York, she founded Betsy Thorpe Literary Services, an independent book consultancy, where she works with authors on their book projects, helps with pitches and finding agents, and pulls together independent editorial teams and designers for self-publishing. She has co-written four books, three of which have been featured in The New York Times.

Cedric Tillman holds a BA in English from UNC Charlotte and graduated from American University's Creative Writing MFA program. He is a Cave Canem fellow and a former Boston Review "Discovery" Contest semifinalist. Cedric's poems have appeared in several publications including Crosscut, Folio, The Drunken Boat, Kakalak, The Chemistry of Color, and Home Is Where: An Anthology of African American Poets From the Carolinas. In 2011, his debut collection was a semifinalist selection for the 42 Miles Press Poetry award; the manuscript, titled Lilies in the Valley, was published by Willow Books in 2013. He lives in Charlotte.

Marybeth Whalen and her husband Curt have been married for 23 years and are the parents of six children, ranging in age from college to elementary school. The family lives in North Carolina. Marybeth is a speaker and the author of five novels. The newest, The Bridge Tender, was released in June. She is the co-founder of the popular women's fiction site, She Reads, at www.shereads.org and is the Writer-in-Residence at a local private school. Marybeth spends most of her time in the grocery store but occasionally escapes long enough to scribble some words. She is always at work on her next novel. You can find her at www.marybethwhalen.com.

Ed Williams is the author of Liberating Dixie: An Editor's Life, from Ole Miss to Obama (Lorimer Press, 2014). For 25 years he was editor of the editorial pages at The Charlotte Observer, where his columns and editorials were part of projects that won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service in 1981 and 1988. He earned a BA in history from the University of Mississippi, where he edited the Daily Mississippian. He served two years in the U.S. Army and in 1967 joined Hodding Carter’s Delta Democrat-Times in Greenville, MS, as a reporter. He was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University and a writer for the Ford Foundation before coming to The Observer as an editorial writer in 1973. He retired in 2008 and was inducted into the North Carolina Journalism Hall of Fame. He lives in Charlotte with his wife, Marylyn.

Kim Wright is the author of The Unexpected Waltz (Gallery Books), Love In Mid Air (Grand Central), and the upcoming Take Me There, which will be published by Gallery Books next spring. She also writes nonfiction, specializing in the areas of food, wine, and travel and has twice been the recipient of the Lowell Thomas Award for travel writing. Kim lives in Charlotte.

 

 

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Support for the 2014 Fall Conference is provided by the NC Arts Council, the Arts and Science Council, the Blumenthal Foundation, Bublish, Charlotte Magazine, John F. Blair, Publisher, Al Manning, Alice Osborn (AliceOsborn.com): Editor, Mentor, Workshop Leader, the Queens University of Charlotte MFA in Creative Writing Program, and the William M. Hendricks Family Foundation.

 

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