White Cross School Blog

 

NC Literary Hall of Fame

 

 

GREENSBORO—If you missed pre-registration for the North Carolina Writers' Network 2016 Spring Conference, attendees can register on-site Saturday, April 23, beginning at 8:00 am in the lobby of the Moore Humanities and Research Administration Building on the UNCG campus.

Spring Conference offers a full day of instruction and camaraderie including small classes led by top writing faculty in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, writing for tweens, building your career, and the Facebook Advantage. Other features include faculty readings, publisher exhibits, Slush Pile Live!, and an open mic for conference participants.

Michael Parker will give the Keynote Address. Michael is the author of six novels, including All I Have in This World, and two collections of short stories. He has received fellowships in fiction from the North Carolina Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the North Carolina Award for Literature. A graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill and the University of Virginia, he is the Vacc Distinguished Professor in the MFA Writing Program at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and since 2009 has been on the faculty of the Warren Wilson Program for Writers.

Slush Pile Live! returns for its second year, with one important change: Slush Pile Live! will offer both poetry and prose in two rooms so that more attendees have a chance to receive feedback on their writing.

Those interested in having their anonymous submission read should bring a hard copy of up to 300 words of prose from a single work or one page of poetry (40-line max) to one of the Slush Pile Live! rooms. Submissions should be double-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font. No names should appear on the submissions. As many submissions as the panelists can get to in an hour, that's how many they'll read: all anonymous—all live! Authors can reveal themselves at the end, to thunderous applause, befitting their bravery, but only if they want to.

The Open Mic is first-come, first served (sign up at the registration table).

For details on the exhibitors who'll be waiting to chat with you, click here, here, and here.

The NCWN 2016 Spring Conference is sponsored in part by the Greensboro News & Record; WFDD 88.5 FM: Public Radio for the Piedmont; and UNCG’s Creative Writing Program, which will provide free parking for Spring Conference registrants in the Oakland Avenue Parking Deck, across Forest Street from the MHRA Building (behind Yum Yum Better Ice Cream and Old Town Draught House). For directions, click here.

The non-profit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, and to register, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

GREENSBORO—Pre-registration for the North Carolina Writers' Network 2016 Spring Conference ends Sunday, April 17. If the stellar faculty lineup isn't enough to get you motivated, here's one more reason to register: Spring Conference will welcome back Slush Pile Live!, with one important change.

Have you ever wondered what goes through an editor's mind as he or she reads a stack of unsolicited submissions? Here’s your chance to find out.

However, the second annual Slush Pile Live! will offer both poetry and prose in two rooms so that more attendees have a chance to receive feedback on their writing!

Beginning at 4:00 pm, attendees may drop off either 300 words of prose or one page of poetry in the room of their choice (prose and poetry will be read in both MHRA rooms 1214 and 1215). The author’s name should not appear on the manuscript.

Then, at 5:00 pm, a panel of editors will listen to the submissions being read out loud and raise their hand when they hear something that would make them stop reading if the piece were being submitted to their publication. The editors will discuss what they did and did not like about the sample, offering constructive feedback on the manuscript itself and the submission process. All anonymous—all live! (Authors can reveal themselves at the end, but only if they want to.)

Those interested in having their anonymous submission read should bring a hard copy of up to 300 words of prose from a single work or one page of poetry (40-line max) to one of the Slush Pile Live! rooms. Submissions should be double-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font. No names should appear on the submissions.

All of last year's panelists return, including:

As many submissions as the panelists can get to in an hour, that's how many they'll read: all anonymous—all live! Authors can reveal themselves at the end, to thunderous applause, befitting their bravery, but only if they want to.

“If you’ve never worked or volunteered for a publisher or literary magazine before, the submission process can seem kind of mysterious,” says NCWN Executive Director Ed Southern. “‘Slush Pile Live!’ will give attendees a peek into the editorial screening process, with the added bonus of giving feedback to anonymously submitted manuscripts in a non-threatening way.”

Other familiar programs will remain, including faculty readings, an open mic for conference participants, an exhibit hall packed with publishers and literary organizations, and “Lunch with an Author,” where conference-goers can spend less time waiting in line and more time talking with the author of their choice. Spaces in “Lunch with an Author” are limited and are first-come, first-served. Pre-registration and an additional fee are required for this offering.

Pre-registration for the North Carolina Writers' Network 2016 Spring Conference closes Sunday, April 17. Register now!

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, and to register, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

ASHEVILLE—Alli Marshall of Asheville has won the 2016 Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize for her short story, “Catching Out.” Alli will receive $1,000 and publication in The Thomas Wolfe Review.

Final judge Ron Rash selected "Catching Out" from more than 200 entries. This was the most entries in the history of The Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize.

Alli Marshall is the Arts & Entertainment editor and lead writer at Asheville's alternative newsweekly Mountain Xpress, where she's worked for thirteen years. She recently won the 2016 Shrewd Writer Award for flash fiction and was a runner-up in the annual Broad River Review Rash Award in fiction. Alli holds an MFA in creative writing from Goddard College. Her prose and poetry has been published in Blurt!, Shuffle, Our State, MetroPop, FifeLines, and the Asheville Poetry Review. Her debut novel, How to Talk to Rockstars, was published by Logosophia Books in 2015. She's currently at work on a new novel set in a mysterious library. She is the Asheville area regional rep for the North Carolina Writers’ Network.

Heather Bell Adams of Raleigh and Katrin Redfern of Brooklyn, New York, were named runners-up for their short stories "Wendell Berry's Peace" and “Love’s Archive,” respectively.

Originally from Hendersonville, Heather Bell Adams now lives in Raleigh where she is a lawyer. Her short fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in Broad River Review, Clapboard House, Pembroke Magazine, Gravel, Deep South Magazine, and elsewhere.

Katrin Redfern was born in London and raised in the States. She currently lives in Brooklyn where you can find her writing for radio, theater, and the page.

The Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize is open to all writers, regardless of geographic location or prior publication. Submitted stories must be unpublished and not exceed twelve double-spaced pages.

The 2016 Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize is administered by the Great Smokies Writing Program at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. The program offers opportunities for writers of all levels to join a supportive learning community in which their skills and talents can be explored, practiced, and forged under the careful eye of professional writers. The program is committed to providing the community with affordable university-level classes led by published writers and experienced teachers. Each course carries academic credit awarded through UNC-Asheville.

The Thomas Wolfe Review is the official journal of The Thomas Wolfe Society, publishing articles, features, tributes, and reviews about Wolfe and his circle. It also features bibliographical material, notes, news, and announcements of interest to Society members.

Final judge Ron Rash is the author of the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Finalist and New York Times bestselling novel Serena, as well as four other prizewinning novels. Twice the recipient of the O. Henry Prize, he teaches at Western Carolina University.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

 
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