White Cross School Blog

 

NC Literary Hall of Fame

 

 

 

Friday-Sunday
November 20-22
DoubleTree by Hilton Asheville-Biltmore
115 Hendersonville Rd.
Asheville, NC 28803
828-274-1800

 

When booking your hotel reservation, use NCW to reserve your room online, or call the hotel at 828-274-1800 and mention NC Writers' Network 2015 Fall Conference to make reservations at the discounted group rate. ++

++ The Doubletree by Hilton Asheville-Biltmore is currently SOLD OUT of guest rooms. Please click here for a list of available hotels 1/4 mile or less (walking distance) from the conference venue.

 

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration opens Friday, November 20.**

 

FEES AND DEADLINES | COMPLETE SCHEDULE-AT-A-GLANCE | WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS

SESSION I | SESSION II | SESSION III | SESSION IV | SESSION V | MASTER CLASSES | MANUSCRIPT MART | CRITIQUE SERVICE | MARKETING MART | FACULTY BIOGRAPHIES

 

Fees & Deadlines

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration opens Friday, November 20.**

 

Early registration: On-site registration:

Member Rates

  • $250 (full conference, with meals)
  • $200 (full conference, without meals)
  • $200 (full conference, without workshops)*
  • $200 (Saturday only, with meals)
  • $100 (Sunday only, without meals)

Nonmember Rates

  • $350 (full conference, with meals)
  • $300 (full conference, without meals)
  • $300 (Saturday only, with meals)
  • $200 (Sunday only, without meals)

Other Fees

  • $30 for a Master Class
  • $160 for Manuscript Mart
  • $150 for Critique Service
  • $150 for Marketing Mart
  • $450 (full conference, without meals—for members and nonmembers)
  • $350 (Saturday only, without meals—for members and nonmembers)
  • $250 (Sunday only, without meals—for members and nonmembers)

*This is our new “Hangout” rate, for NCWN members who want to come hang out with their friends, enjoy the group meals and general sessions, but not take any workshops.

 

Scholarships

Limited scholarship aid is available for the Fall Conference. To apply, send your current CV and a statement of writing intent—describing your background and goals as a writer—to Ed Southern at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

In addition, the Mary Belle Campbell Scholarships are open to applications from poets who teach full-time. For more information, please e-mail Ed Southern at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The deadline for all scholarship applications is October 30.

 

Cancellations and Refunds

Cancellations must be made in writing and arrive at the Network by 5:00 pm on Friday, November 6, 2015, for you to receive a refund of the registration fee, less 25 percent. No-shows or cancellations after November 6 are nonrefundable.

Manuscript Mart, Critique Service, Marketing Mart, and Master Class fees are not refundable if you cancel. However, if we are not able to find a place for you in the Manuscript Mart, Critique Service, or Marketing Mart, we will return your check(s) for related extra charge(s).

Master Class application fees are nonrefundable.

Send all refund requests to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Deadlines

 

October 30

Deadline to reserve hotel rooms at low conference rate*
($145 + taxes and fees/night); please click here or call 828-274-1800 and use the code "NCW" to reserve your room) ++

* Conference-rate rooms subject to limited availability, and will be allocated on first-come, first-served basis.

++ The Doubletree by Hilton Asheville-Biltmore is currently SOLD OUT of guest rooms. Please click here for a list of available hotels 1/4 mile or less (walking distance) from the conference venue.

October 30 Deadline for all scholarship applications (Fees & Deadlines)
November 6 Deadline for Master Class registration (see guidelines)
November 6 Deadline for Manuscript Mart / Critique Service / Marketing Mart registration (see guidelines)
November 13 Deadline for early registration (5:00 pm by phone or mail; midnight if registering online). The first 12 Fall Conference registrants to mention this sentence at the registration table will receive $20 off their next year’s NCWN member dues.
November 20-22 On-site registration available at conference
November 20-22 Fall Conference in session

 

For Writers with Special Needs

The North Carolina Writers' Network strives to make our programs and services accessible to all writers, including those with special needs. If you require conference materials either in large print or in Braille, or if you require a sign-language interpreter, please register for the conference and submit your request to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. no later than October 23. If you require any other special assistance, please let us know as soon as possible at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. We will do our best to accommodate all reasonable requests.

 

e-Packets

In an effort to save money, time, and resources, the Network will send to all 2015 Fall Conference registrants, exhibitors, and faculty an e-Packet, prior to November 20. The e-Packet will contain all the usual conference packet materials, in the form of a PDF that registrants can print or download to bring with them to the conference.

Name tags, personalized schedules, and copies of the Schedule-at-a-Glance will still be available at the registration table the day of the conference.

If you prefer to receive a traditional printed packet at the conference, please indicate this preference in the space provided on your registration form.

 

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Complete Schedule-At-A-Glance

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration opens Friday, November 20.**

 

Friday, November 20

3:00 – 10:00 pm...........Registration and Book Sales open
5:00 - 9:00 pm..............Exhibitor Tables Open
7:00 – 8:00 pm.............Opening Reception Sponsored by Lenoir-Rhyne University MA in Writing
8:00 – 9:00 pm.............Keynote Address by Lee Smith
9:00 – 10:00 pm...........Reception / Book Signing Sponsored by Lenoir-Rhyne University MA in Writing

 

Saturday, November 21

7:30 – 9:00 am............Continental Breakfast available
7:30 am – 7:30 pm......Registration Table open
8:00 am - 7:30 pm.......Book Sales and Exhibitor Tables open
8:00 – 9:00 am............All Stories Connect Panel Discussion: "Mountains Moving" with Debora Kinsland Foerst, Dee James, and Brent Martin Sponsored by WCQS Western North Carolina Public Radio

9:00 am – 10:30 am......Workshop Session I

"Believe It or Not! Fact or Fiction?" with Lee Smith **Closed**
"Web Tools for Writers" with Charles Fiore and Nicki Leone
"The Prose Poem" with Nickole Brown
"The Alchemy of Revision: Poetry Master Class" with Tina Barr**Closed**
"Using the Imagination in Memoir: Creative Nonfiction Master Class" with Christine Hale**Closed**
"Locating Our Stories: Fiction Master Class" with Tommy Hays**Closed**
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service/Marketing Mart*

10:30 – 11:00 am...........Break
11:00 am – 12:30 pm.....Workshop Session II

"Creative Nonfiction: Exploring Possibilities, Generating New Work" with Catherine Reid**Closed**
"Writing Young Adult Fiction" with Megan Shepherd
"The Art of Editing Poetry" with Keith Flynn**Closed**
"The Alchemy of Revision: Poetry Master Class" with Tina Barr (Cont.)**Closed**
"Using the Imagination in Memoir: Creative Nonfiction Master Class" with Christine Hale (Cont.)**Closed**
"Locating Our Stories: Fiction Master Class" with Tommy Hays (Cont.)**Closed**
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service/Marketing Mart*

12:30 – 1:30 pm.........Luncheon featuring Kathryn Stripling Byer

1:45 – 2:15 pm...........Network Town Hall Meeting
2:15 – 2:30 pm...........Break
2:30 pm – 4:00 pm.....Workshop Session III

"Narrative Medicine: Stories in Clinical Care" with Laura Hope-Gill
"Jump-Starting the Gentle Reader: That Perfect First Paragraph (fiction)" with Wayne Caldwell**Closed**
"Writers and the Law" with Heather Newton
"The Alchemy of Revision: Poetry Master Class" with Tina Barr(Cont.)**Closed**
"Using the Imagination in Memoir: Creative Nonfiction Master Class" with Christine Hale(Cont.)**Closed**
"Locating Our Stories: Fiction Master Class" with Tommy Hays(Cont.)**Closed**
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service/Marketing Mart*

4:00 – 4:30 pm......Break
4:30 – 5:30 pm......Faculty Readings
Sponsored by Western Carolina University MA in Professional Writing

6:00 – 7:00 pm......Happy Hour
Sponsored by Alice Osborn (AliceOsborn.com): Write from the Inside Out

7:00 – 8:30 pm......Network Banquet featuring Keith Flynn & The Holy Men
8:30 – 9:00 pm......Book Signing
9:00 – 10:00 pm....Open Mic Readings (Sign up at registration table) Sponsored by Al Manning

 

Sunday, November 22

7:30 – 9:00 am.............Continental Breakfast available
7:30 am – 1:00 pm.......Registration Table open
8:00 – 1:00 pm.............Book Sales and Exhibitor Tables open
8:00 – 9:00 am.............Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: "Agents and Editors" with Gary Heidt, Stephen Kirk, Neeti Madan, and Betsy Teter
Sponsored by Robert Beatty, Disney-Hyperion Author of Serafina and the Black Cloak

9:00 am – 10:30 am.......Workshop Session IV

"Writing Description that Means Something" (fiction) with John Lane
"Personal Poetry Dives into Archetype" with Katherine Soniat
"Memoir Plus: Doing More With Memoir" with Jeremy B. Jones**Closed**
"Writing Middle Grade Fiction" with Robert Beatty
"Ready to Submit?" with Joy Neaves
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service/Marketing Mart*

10:30 – 11:00 am............Break
11:00 am – 12:30 pm......Workshop Session V

"Getting Out of Your Own (and Your Character’s) Way: Guided Fiction Writing" with Pamela Duncan
"Guiding Others through Places You Love" with Danny Bernstein
"To Rhyme or Not to Rhyme, That is the Question" with Laurence Avery
"Mystery 101" with Vicki Lane
"Shelf Reliance: Building Productive Partnerships with Independent Booksellers" with Amy Cherrix**Closed**
Manuscript Mart/Critique Service/Marketing Mart*

12:30 – 1:00 pm.............Closing Conversation & Raffle Prizes

 

*by prior registration only

 

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Workshop Descriptions

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration opens Friday, November 20.**

 

Saturday, November 21

9:00 – 10:30 am: Workshop Session I

Believe It Or Not! Fact Or Fiction? with Lee Smith**Closed**
Having just finished my first nonfiction book, I'd like to open up a freewheeling discussion on the hazards and benefits of both genres...and offer a few hard-earned pointers on how to make the page come alive in either form.

Web Tools for Writers with Charles Fiore and Nicki Leone
If you’ve ever attended a writing conference, you’ve probably been encouraged to start a Facebook page, choose a Twitter handle, and build a personal website. You’ve been told how important it is for writers to be engaged on social media, solicit reviews on Amazon and Goodreads, and generally be an active member of the online community. But telling an author “You should be on Twitter” isn’t all that helpful when you don’t know what Twitter is―or how some successful authors are using it to sell books and further their careers. In this workshop, we’ll start from the ground up, learn how to use and interact with various social media tools, discuss online etiquette (so you don’t end up putting your virtual foot in your virtual mouth), and try to look under the hood of the literary monster truck that is Amazon.com. Feel free to bring your laptop and follow along.

The Prose Poem with Nickole Brown
"Which of us has not dreamed, in his ambitious days, of the miracle of a poetic prose. . . supple enough and jarring enough to be adapted to the soul's lyrical movements, to the undulations of reverie, to the sudden starts that consciousness takes?" This was first asked by Baudelaire in 19th-Century France, and here we are, so many years later, still answering his call. Nickole Brown, poet and co-editor of the Marie Alexander Series—an imprint of White Pine Press dedicated to promoting and publishing American prose poetry for nearly two decades—will discuss this elusive hybrid and its possibilities. Come prepared with an open mind to read poems that take their own unexpected forms and perhaps to try writing some of your own.

The Alchemy of Revision: Poetry Master Class with Tina Barr**Closed**
Refining our poems to turn them into gold doesn’t happen magically; it takes huge amounts of work. Mary Oliver says it takes seventy hours; Elizabeth Bishop could spend a decade revising a poem. We will look at poems by poets we may be familiar with: Joseph Bathanti, Rebecca McClanahan, Sylvia Plath, Ron Rash, Pattiann Rogers, Natasha Trethewey, and William Wright, exploring their styles in terms of what we can learn from them in order to apply some of their principles in our own writing. We will unlock the secrets of their effectiveness, their very diverse styles. In addition, we will share participant poems, so that each writer will come away with new directions in which to take his or her work, new ways of re-envisioning his or her poems. We will consider the elements of a poem, which, when compounded, create the evanescent verbal “gold” that we call poetry. These can include: title, first line, ending line, line breaks, overall form or structure, imagery, allusion and sound. I create a supportive space in which to assist writers in developing their best work: critical, but kind. And I respect a diversity of voices.

Please submit three poems, along with your current CV, no later than November 6. Poems should be saved in a single MS Word document, using single-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Accepted registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

Using the Imagination in Memoir: Creative Nonfiction Master Class with Christine Hale**Closed**
Although memoirists can and should struggle to tell the truth about themselves and others, good memoir relies on a good capacity for imagination. A writer must use imagination when writing memoir because the facts we think we remember are not, in fact, facts. Robert Root, writing about memory in The Nonfictionist’s Guide, says, “What is seen is determined by the eye of the beholder. Who you are determines what you pay attention to.” And I would add to that, “Who you are at a given point in time determines what you pay attention to and how you interpret it.” During our time together, I’ll provide examples of and the rationale for the role of imagination in memoir. We’ll workshop a portion of each participant's submission, attending not only to what's working well but also the places where imagination might be used to good advantage. Time permitting, we will complete writing exercises practicing the techniques we have discussed. Participants should come away from the sessions with strategies for artfully deploying imagination in their memoir projects.

Please submit up to 1,500 words from a single work, along with your current CV, no later than November 6. Submissions should be saved as an MS Word document, using double-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font, with numbered pages, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Accepted registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

Locating Our Stories: Fiction Master Class with Tommy Hays**Closed**
We writers often undervalue or simply overlook our own personal landscapes as sources for our fiction. No matter how much they mean to us, we can’t imagine anyone else might find these places compelling. So we avoid writing about them and by doing so, cut ourselves off from some of our best sources. Or we might believe that by writing too specifically about these places that we’ll lose the reader’s interest. After all, the reader hasn’t been there. Or perhaps we think of place as scenery, something obligatory and token, like a plywood set to be carted on and off. In this workshop we will explore place as an essential, living part of story making. We’ll read student submitted work closely and one of the lenses we’ll examine it through will be place, not as backdrop but as embodied emotional terrain.

Please submit up to 1,500 words from a single work, along with your current CV, no later than November 6. Submissions should be saved as an MS Word document, using double-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font, with numbered pages, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Accepted registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

 

11:00 am – 12:30 pm: Workshop Session II

Creative Nonfiction: Exploring Possibilities, Generating New Work with Catherine Reid**Closed**
Creative nonfiction, sometimes called literary or narrative nonfiction, emphasizes craft as much as content—the way something is written as much as its choice of subject matter. Many of the techniques we use come from the fiction writer’s repertoire, such as how to begin scenes, build momentum, and keep a reader turning pages. We also rely heavily on the poet’s sensibilities, paying particular attention to the rhythms and sounds of language as well as to the careful use of images and metaphors.

In this workshop, we will look at several short examples from masters of the craft as well as at the range of possibilities, from memoir and personal essays to more complex, braided forms. The session will include writing exercises that illustrate aspects of CNF and tips on revision, all aimed at helping shape detailed, compelling work. Participants will leave with several “flash nonfictions,” suggested reading lists, and a refined sense of what constitutes well-crafted CNF.

Writing Young Adult Fiction with Megan Shepherd
Young Adult fiction is one of the fastest-growing categories of books, in large part because it's read by much more than just teenagers! Hits like Twilight, The Hunger Games, and The Fault in Our Stars have found a wide audience because of their universal themes and riveting plots. This workshop will discuss both the craft portion of writing young adult books, including the common tropes and rules of YA, and the philosophy of writing for teens; and also the business side, looking at the many avenues of publication (indie publishing, transitional publishing, hybrid publishing), how to find an agent, and what to expect during publication. There will also be a Q&A.

The Art of Editing Poetry with Keith Flynn**Closed**
Every decision in the composition of a poem is key to the overall tone, lyricism, and impact. And each poem has a central axis upon which its secrets and narrative are slowly revealed, unveiling both the propulsion and purpose, the hidden commerce between unseen things. This workshop will take the ambiguity out of the process, illustrating how every poem is built one choice, one word, or one image at a time, and still resonate with the mystery inherent in all of our best writing.

Each participant should send two poems, in advance, for analysis and at least twenty copies of each poem. Any work deemed exemplary will be considered for publication in Asheville Poetry Review. This class will benefit both the novice and the sophisticated craftsman.

The Alchemy of Revision: Poetry Master Class with Tina Barr **Closed**
See Above.

Using the Imagination in Memoir: Creative Nonfiction Master Class with Christine Hale**Closed**
See Above.

Locating Our Stories: Fiction Master Class with Tommy Hays**Closed**
See Above.

 

 

2:30 – 4:00 pm: Workshop Session III

Narrative Medicine: Stories in Clinical Care with Laura Hope-Gill
Narrative Medicine is the application of literature and narrative theory to clinical care practice. In this workshop, Laura Hope-Gill will present the context and objectives of Narrative Medicine as developed at Columbia University Program in Narrative Medicine in developing empathy through attention, recognition, and affiliation. To illustrate this midrashian method for improving patient care and ethical consideration, Hope-Gill will facilitate a narrative session of close reading, reflective writing, and witnessing.

Jump-Starting the Gentle Reader: That Perfect First Paragraph (fiction) with Wayne Caldwell**Closed**
We will begin with some famous first sentences, then branch out into what has given us fits in our own writing. Bring some of your own work to share—something you’re proud of, or something not so good that we can critique. Multiple copies encouraged (sentences, a paragraph, not a novel, please). If we are really cooking with gas we’ll end up with a few perfect firsts of our own.

Writers and the Law with Heather Newton
This workshop will discuss legal issues writers commonly encounter in the areas of copyright and defamation. Come learn what your copyright protects, what constitutes "fair use" of another's work and when you need permission, and what you need to know if the main character in your novel bears a striking resemblance to your litigious Aunt Maude.

The Alchemy of Revision: Poetry Master Class with Tina Barr **Closed**
See Above.

Using the Imagination in Memoir: Creative Nonfiction Master Class with Christine Hale**Closed**
See Above.

Locating Our Stories: Fiction Master Class with Tommy Hays**Closed**
See Above.

 

Sunday, November 22

9:00 – 10:30 am: Workshop Session IV

Writing Description that Means Something (fiction) with John Lane
Often fiction writers think of description as fluff, something to be skipped or ignored. This workshop will discuss several ways you can make your description as important as dialogue, character, or even plot.

Personal Poetry Dives into Archetype with Katherine Soniat
Using your own experience, let’s make a journey into archetypal imagery to deepen your approach to writing. In this workshop you will swim to another level in which time and space shift, place becomes surprise, and voice is heard in a different key. The “hungry ghost” is always there, willing to share more of a vivid terrain! As poet Eva Saulius says, “I write to feed the hungry ghost, the one for whom inspiration leaps like a saved rabbit among the trees.” Those flashing moments are when one discovers poetry. Come join us!

Memoir Plus: Doing More with Memoir with Jeremy B. Jones**Closed**
The memoir form sometimes carries with it an unfortunate and limiting reputation as navel-gazing and dreary. Of course, the best memoirs do much more than meticulously document a writer’s dark past: they open up wide-reaching subjects; they find the universal through the personal. This workshop will explore work by writers who successfully weave in other subjects—family history, cultural change, geography, music, and more—in order to create artful and ambitious literary nonfiction. Participants will discuss excerpts from such multidimensional memoirs and take part in numerous exercises to generate new work and stretch out the scope of any current projects.

Writing Middle Grade Fiction with Robert Beatty
Robert Beatty will outline what he has found to be the most important elements and techniques for writing a successful Middle Grade or Young Adult novel. He will also provide a set of tips and guidelines for the best way to approach publishers with your work.

Ready to Submit? with Joy Neaves
In this workshop, you can learn everything you need to know about writing an effective synopsis and query letter, how to format your manuscript, how to target editors and agents, and how to respond to any encouraging feedback you may receive about your work. The instructor will provide resources and handouts, and will facilitate a structured conversation about how to approach writing queries and synopses that will grab editors’ and agents’ attention.

 

11:00 am – 12:30 pm: Workshop Session V

Getting Out of Your Own (and Your Character’s) Way: Guided Fiction Writing with Pamela Duncan
Doris Betts said of writing fiction, “Each draft is a conversation I'm having with my characters, getting to know them.” Sometimes, however, the conversation stalls, leaving you and your character feeling like strangers. That’s when guided writing exercises can help. These can be a great way to overcome writer’s block, learn more about your characters and story, and take your writing to places you never thought you’d go. The constraints of sentence-level prompts may lead you to discover new aspects of your subject even as you develop your content because following these prompts keeps you from directing your observations in familiar, perhaps predictable, ways.

Guiding Others through Places You Love with Danny Bernstein
There’s a big world out there to write about, and guidebooks still contain the most reliable travel information. Ever think about writing a travel guide about your town, a favorite park, or beach? Many places still need trustworthy guides, whether it’s Cape Hatteras or the Cape of Good Hope. Producing travel and outdoor guides seems so glamorous and even easy, but what is the reality? In this workshop, we’ll discuss how to choose a location, look at the competition, decide on your audience, and find your niche. We’ll look at the writing and editing process for guidebooks. Moreover, no workshop on travel guides is complete without discussing how to market your book. Please bring your two favorite guidebooks. We’ll do an in-class exercise with feedback.

Mystery 101 with Vicki Lane
Whether it's a steamy bit of noir with a hard-drinking gumshoe, a chilling novel of psychological suspense, or a light-hearted cozy starring a ditzy tea shop owner/amateur sleuth, the basics are the same. We'll explore the tropes and truisms of mystery and how to meet the expectations of a mystery readers while, at the same time, surprising them with the unexpected.

To Rhyme or Not to Rhyme, That is the Question with Laurence Avery
The workshop will focus on that question—whether in a given poem to make use of rhymes and rhyme schemes, or not. Rhyme can be an important element in the sound activity of a poem, and there is no question that people find rhyming sounds pleasurable. But rhyme can also bring problems for the writer, as when he or she is tempted to move words out of their normal position in a sentence in order to get the needed rhyming sound at the end of a line. For this reason and a number of others, poets frequently decide that rhyme, on balance, isn’t worthwhile in a given poem. Such decisions reflect the sensibility of individual writers, of course, and may differ from person to person. But the decisions involve questions that are important to think about as you plan a poem. For instance, would rhyme help establish the tone you aim for—humorous, solemn, ironic, earthy? Do you want to expand the pool of rhyming sounds by experimenting with assonance and consonance? What considerations would lead you to forego the use of rhyme in a poem? In the workshop we will explore such matters, using poems by recent writers as examples.

Shelf Reliance: Building Productive Partnerships with Independent Booksellers with Amy Cherrix**Closed**
The new Author Liaison for the Southern Independent Booksellers Association will tell writers how they can work with independent booksellers in their community, state, region, and nation for maximum mutual benefit. Topics will include tips for getting your book noticed by indie booksellers, crafting a compelling press kit, and leveraging SIBA Author Benefits for your book.

 

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Master Classes

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration opens Friday, November 20.**

 

Master Classes offer intermediate and advanced writers a chance to delve more deeply into a particular genre. Each Master Class will take place over the course of Sessions I, II, and III, and will be limited to the first sixteen qualified registrants.

While publication credits are not required, Master Class participants should be experienced writers, dedicated to their craft. Applications will be reviewed, and qualified registrants admitted, on a rolling basis, until the deadline of Friday, November 6.

When you register for a Master Class, please choose another class as a back-up in case you are not admitted to the Master Class.

Please submit your current CV, along with the required manuscript (see each Master Class’s course description, below, for its manuscript requirements), to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., no later than 4 pm, Friday, November 6.

Application to a Master Class requires a non-refundable $30 processing fee, in addition to the Fall Conference registration fee. If registering for the conference online or by phone, you can pay this processing fee with a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover. If registering by mail, you must include a separate check for $30.

MASTER CLASS REGISTRATIONS (INCLUDING REQUIRED MANUSCRIPTS) MUST BE RECEIVED BY 4:00 PM, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6.

The Alchemy of Revision: Poetry Master Class with Tina Barr**Closed**
Refining our poems to turn them into gold doesn’t happen magically; it takes huge amounts of work. Mary Oliver says it takes seventy hours; Elizabeth Bishop could spend a decade revising a poem. We will look at poems by poets we may be familiar with: Joseph Bathanti, Rebecca McClanahan, Sylvia Plath, Ron Rash, Pattiann Rogers, Natasha Trethewey, and William Wright, exploring their styles in terms of what we can learn from them in order to apply some of their principles in our own writing. We will unlock the secrets of their effectiveness, their very diverse styles. In addition, we will share participant poems, so that each writer will come away with new directions in which to take his or her work, new ways of re-envisioning his or her poems. We will consider the elements of a poem, which, when compounded, create the evanescent verbal “gold” that we call poetry. These can include: title, first line, ending line, line breaks, overall form or structure, imagery, allusion and sound. I create a supportive space in which to assist writers in developing their best work: critical, but kind. And I respect a diversity of voices.

Please submit three poems, along with your current CV, no later than November 6. Poems should be saved in a single MS Word document, using single-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Accepted registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

Using the Imagination in Memoir: Creative Nonfiction Master Class with Christine Hale**Closed**
Although memoirists can and should struggle to tell the truth about themselves and others, good memoir relies on a good capacity for imagination. A writer must use imagination when writing memoir because the facts we think we remember are not, in fact, facts. Robert Root, writing about memory in The Nonfictionist’s Guide, says, “What is seen is determined by the eye of the beholder. Who you are determines what you pay attention to.” And I would add to that, “Who you are at a given point in time determines what you pay attention to and how you interpret it.” During our time together, I’ll provide examples of and the rationale for the role of imagination in memoir. We’ll workshop a portion of each participant's submission, attending not only to what's working well but also the places where imagination might be used to good advantage. Time permitting, we will complete writing exercises practicing the techniques we have discussed. Participants should come away from the sessions with strategies for artfully deploying imagination in their memoir projects.

Please submit up to 1,500 words from a single work, along with your current CV, no later than November 6. Submissions should be saved in a single MS Word document, using double-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font, with numbered pages, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Accepted registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

Locating Our Stories: Fiction Master Class with Tommy Hays**Closed**
We writers often undervalue or simply overlook our own personal landscapes as sources for our fiction. No matter how much they mean to us, we can’t imagine anyone else might find these places compelling. So we avoid writing about them and by doing so, cut ourselves off from some of our best sources. Or we might believe that by writing too specifically about these places that we’ll lose the reader’s interest. After all, the reader hasn’t been there. Or perhaps we think of place as scenery, something obligatory and token, like a plywood set to be carted on and off. In this workshop we will explore place as an essential, living part of story making. We’ll read student submitted work closely and one of the lenses we’ll examine it through will be place, not as backdrop but as embodied emotional terrain.

Please submit up to 1,500 words from a single work, along with your current CV, no later than November 6. Submissions should be saved in a single MS Word document, using double-spaced, 12-point, Times New Roman font, with numbered pages, and sent as an attachment to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Accepted registrants will also be asked to circulate their drafts to others in the class prior to the conference.

 

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Manuscript Mart

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration opens Friday, November 20.**

 

Manuscript Mart provides writers with the opportunity to pitch their manuscripts and get feedback from an editor or agent with a leading publisher or literary agency. A one-on-one, thirty-minute pitch and Q&A session will be scheduled for you, to take place on Saturday, November 21, sometime between 9:00 am and 5:00 pm, or on Sunday, November 22, between 9:00 am and 12:30 pm.

Please note, a Manuscript Mart session can lead directly to publication—but don't expect it to do so. Think of it, instead, as a learning opportunity, and you'll get more out of it.

Manuscript Mart sessions are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. YOUR MANUSCRIPT MART REGISTRATION, WITH MANUSCRIPT AND PAYMENT ENCLOSED, MUST REACH THE NETWORK BY FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6.

 

Guidelines

Submit two copies of a one-page query letter/synopsis and no more than twenty double-spaced, single-sided, sequential pages of your fiction or nonfiction manuscript. Make sure your name is on each page of your submission. NUMBER YOUR PAGES.

All submissions must be double-spaced, in twelve-point Times New Roman font, printed on one side only of 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper, with one-inch margins.

You must be registered for the conference for your Manuscript Mart session to be scheduled.

North Carolina Writers’ Network
Fall Conference Manuscript Mart
PO Box 21591
Winston-Salem, NC 27120

Checklist:

  • two copies of manuscript and query letter
  • Manuscript Mart cover sheet;
  • Check to cover Manuscript Mart ($160);
  • A separate check to cover all other conference fees, if you are registering for the conference through the mail.

 

NOTE: If Manuscript Mart fills, your check will be returned to you.

 

Manuscript Mart Reviewers

From the names below, select your first, second, and third choice on your registration form. We will try to accommodate your first choice; if we cannot, we will select an appropriate editor or agent for you. The name of your assigned agent or editor, as well as the time and location of your session, will be included in the packet you will receive at the conference registration table.

Gary Heidt, Signature Literary Agency
Stephen Kirk, John F. Blair, Publisher
Neeti Madan, Sterling Lord Literistic**Closed**
Betsy Teter, Hub City Press

 

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Critique Service

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration opens Friday, November 20.**

 

The Critique Service provides writers with in-depth literary critique of fiction, nonfiction, or poetry, by a seasoned writer or editor. A one-on-one, thirty-minute review session will be scheduled for you, to take place on Saturday, November 21, sometime between 9:00 am and 5:00 pm, or on Sunday, November 22, between 9:00 am and 12:30 pm.

Critiques are scheduled on a first-come, first-served basis. YOUR CRITIQUE SERVICE REGISTRATION, WITH MANUSCRIPT AND PAYMENT ENCLOSED, MUST REACH THE NETWORK BY FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6.

 

Guidelines

Submit two copies of no more than twenty double-spaced, single-sided, sequential pages of your fiction or nonfiction manuscript (for book-length projects, you must include a one-page synopsis of the work as a whole, in addition to the twenty pages), or ten pages of poetry. Make sure your name is on each page of your submission. NUMBER YOUR PAGES.

Prose submissions must be double-spaced, in twelve-point Times New Roman font, printed on one side only of 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper, with one-inch margins.

Poetry submissions must be single-spaced, in twelve-point Times New Roman font, printed on one side only of 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper, with one-inch margins, and should include no more than one poem per page.

Download and print the Critique Service cover sheet, which you may also download from the online Registration Form at www.ncwriters.org. Mail it with two hard copies of your submission to:

North Carolina Writers’ Network
Fall Conference Critique Service
PO Box 21591
Winston-Salem, NC 27120

Checklist:

  • Two copies of manuscript (and synopsis, if appropriate);
  • Critique Service cover sheet;
  • Check to cover Critique Service ($150);
  • A separate check to cover all other conference fees if you are registering for the conference through the mail.

 

NOTE: If Critique Service fills, your check will be returned to you.

 

Critiquers

From the names below, select your first, second, and third choice. We will try to accommodate your first choice; if we cannot, we will select an appropriate critiquer for you. The name of your assigned critiquer, as well as the time and location of your session, will be included in the packet you will receive at the conference registration table.

Amy Cherrix, Children’s
Luke Hankins, Poetry
Jeremy B. Jones, Fiction/Creative Nonfiction
Joy Neaves, Fiction, Children's

 

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Marketing Mart

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration opens Friday, November 20.**

 

Marketing Mart provides writers with an opportunity to create or refine an effective plan to pitch, promote, and sell their current, upcoming, or proposed books. The Network will schedule you a one-on-one, thirty-minute session with a bookselling professional, to take place sometime between 9:00 am and 5:00 pm on Saturday, November 22, or between 9:00 am and 12:30 pm on Sunday, November 23.

Marketing Mart sessions will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. YOUR MARKETING MART REGISTRATION, WITH MATERIALS AND PAYMENT ENCLOSED, MUST REACH THE NETWORK BY FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6.

 

Guidelines

  • Registrants must submit the following:
    • A one-page synopsis of their book or manuscript
    • A one-page bio or CV of themselves
    • The first three pages of their book or manuscript
    • A check or money order, made payable to NC Writers’ Network, for $150
  • Note: If Marketing Mart fills, your check will be returned to you.
  • All submissions must be double-spaced, in twelve-point Times New Roman font, printed on one side only of 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper, with one-inch margins.
  • You must register for the Fall Conference to have a Marketing Mart session scheduled.
  • Download and print the Marketing Mart cover sheet, which you may also download from the online Registration Form at www.ncwriters.org. Mail it with two hard copies of your submission to:

North Carolina Writers’ Network
Fall Conference Marketing Mart
PO Box 21591
Winston-Salem, NC 27120

 

Marketing Mart Reviewer

Nicki Leone

 

 

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Faculty Biographies

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration opens Friday, November 20.**

 

 

Laurence Avery had a decades-long career as teacher and scholar at UNC-Chapel Hill, where he served as chairman of the English department. He has published numerous articles on British and American playwrights and six books, among them A Southern Life: Letters of Paul Green, 1916-1981, winner of the C. Hugh Holman Award for distinguished contributions to the study of Southern literature. Avery also published the definitive edition of Green’s The Lost Colony, the play that launched the nation-wide outdoor drama movement. In 2006 he received the NC Literary and Historical Association’s R. Hunt Parker Award for significant contributions to North Carolina literature. Mountain Gravity, his first book of poetry, appeared in 2014.

Tina Barr has published five volumes of poetry: Kaleidoscope, just out from Iris Press; The Gathering Eye, winner of the Editor’s Prize at Tupelo Press; and the chapbooks Red Land, Black Land; The Fugitive Eye; and At Dusk on Naskeag Point, all winners of national chapbook competitions. Her awards include fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, the Tennessee Arts Commission, the MacDowell Colony, and the Ucross Foundation.

Robert Beatty's novel Serafina and the Black Cloak—a spooky mystery-thriller about an unusual girl who lives secretly in the basement of Biltmore Estate—was published by Disney Hyperion in 2015. His book has won critical praise from Kirkus Reviews, Booklist, SLJ, and the Historical Novel Society, and was recently named a 2015 Okra Pick as representing “the best in Southern literature.” Robert lives in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Asheville, North Carolina, with his wife and three daughters, who help create and refine his stories. He loves to explore the grand Biltmore Estate and the darkened forest trails where his novels take place. He writes full-time now, but in his past lives, Robert was one of the early pioneers of cloud computing, the founder/CEO of Plex Systems, the co-founder of Beatty Robotics, and the chairman/CTO of Narrative magazine. In 2007, he was named an Entrepreneur of the Year.

Danny Bernstein’s mission is to get people out of their cars and hiking. A committed hiker for more than forty years, she completed the Appalachian Trail, all the trails in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the South beyond 6000, and the Mountains-to-Sea Trail. She’s written two hiking guides, Hiking the Carolina Mountains and Hiking North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains, and a travel memoir, The Mountains-to-Sea Trail across North Carolina. Her articles have appeared in numerous outdoor publications including Smokies Life, Blue Ridge Outdoors, and National Parks Traveler. Her forthcoming book, Forests, Alligators, Battlefields: My Journey through the National Parks of the South, will come out in 2016, the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service. Danny blogs at www.hikertohiker.com. Her motto is “No place is too far to walk if you have the time.” Danny plans to die with her boots on.

Nickole Brown grew up in Louisville, Kentucky, and Deerfield Beach, Florida. Her books include Fanny Says, a collection of poems published by BOA Editions in 2015; her debut, Sister, a novel-in-poems published by Red Hen Press in 2007; and an anthology, Air Fare, that she co-edited with Judith Taylor. She graduated from The Vermont College of Fine Arts, studied literature at Oxford University as an English Speaking Union Scholar, and was the editorial assistant for the late Hunter S. Thompson. She worked at the independent literary press Sarabande Books for ten years, and she was the National Publicity Consultant for Arktoi Books and the Palm Beach Poetry Festival. She has taught creative writing at the University of Louisville and Bellarmine University. Currently, she is the Editor for the Marie Alexander Series in Prose Poetry at White Pine Press and is on faculty every summer at the Sewanee Young Writers’ Conference and at the low-residency MFA Program in Creative Writing at Murray State. She lives with her wife, poet Jessica Jacobs.

Kathryn Stripling Byer lives in the highlands of western North Carolina. Her work has received the Laughlin Award (Wildwood Flower, LSU Press) from the Academy of American Poets, the Hanes Poetry Award from The Fellowship of Southern Writers (Coming to Rest, LSU Press) and Book of the Year awards from the NC Literary and Historical Association and the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance. She served for five years as North Carolina’s first woman Poet Laureate.

Wayne Caldwell, a native of Asheville, is the author of prize-winning short stories and two novels, Cataloochee (2007) and Requiem by Fire (2010), the latter of which won the 2010 Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award from the WNC Historical Association. He wrote the sixth chapter of a collaborative novel, Naked Came the Leaf Peeper (Burning Bush Press, 2011). A poem, “Woodsmoke,” appeared in Appalachian Heritage. “Rattlesnakes,” a short story about Asheville’s proposed 1980 downtown mall, appeared in 27 Views of Asheville (Eno Publishers, 2012). He received the James Still Award for excellence in writing about the Appalachian South from the Fellowship of Southern Writers in 2013. A third novel, Memoirs of an Unambitious Lawyer, was a finalist for the Lee Smith Fiction Prize from Carolina Wren Press, and seeks a publisher. In his spare time he works up firewood.

Amy Cherrix acquired and edited books at Houghton Mifflin Books for Young Readers before launching her children’s book editorial and marketing consultancy, Slush Pile Press. She has written and edited reviews for The Horn Book Guide and taught graduate courses at the Center for the Study of Children’s Literature at Simmons College, where she earned a Master’s degree in children's lit and also mentors MFA candidates. She is a diehard supporter of independent bookstores with years of experience as a children's bookseller at the fiercely independent Porter Square Books in Cambridge, MA. Prior to her career in publishing, she worked in film and television production. When she is not reading, trolling the Internet for late-breaking children's publishing headlines, or mining the blog-o-sphere for brain-boggling science facts, she writes books of her own: Landfall: The Hurricane Scientists (Spring 2017) as part of Houghton Mifflin’s award-winning Scientists in the Field series for young readers, and most recently, Curious George Discovers the Rainbow (Houghton Mifflin, spring 2015).

Pamela Duncan lives in Sylva and teaches creative writing at Western Carolina University. She holds a BA in Journalism from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and an MA in English/Creative Writing from North Carolina State University. She is the author of three novels: Moon Women, a Southeast Booksellers Association Award Finalist; Plant Life, winner of the 2003 Sir Walter Raleigh Award for Fiction; and The Big Beautiful. In 2007 she received the 2007 James Still Award for Writing about the Appalachian South, awarded by the Fellowship of Southern Writers. Duncan has appeared on North Carolina Bookwatch on public television and on The State of Things on NPR. She is currently at work on The Wilder Place, a novel set in western North Carolina. Visit her website at www.pameladuncan.com.

Charles Fiore is the communications director of the North Carolina Writers’ Network, where he manages social media and public relations campaigns for the Network’s programming, and maintains the organization’s websites. Previously, he served as the public relations director for ACTA Publications, where he managed publicity campaigns for bestselling authors Bill James, Gary Graf, and Paul Wilkes, among many others. Fiore is the author of the novel, Green Gospel (Livingston Press).

Keith Flynn (www.keithflynn.net) is the award-winning author of seven books, including five collections of poetry: The Talking Drum (1991), The Book of Monsters (1994), The Lost Sea (2000), The Golden Ratio (Iris Press, 2007), Colony Collapse Disorder (Wings Press, 2013), and a collection of essays titled The Rhythm Method, Razzmatazz and Memory: How To Make Your Poetry Swing (Writer's Digest Books, 2007). His latest book is a collaboration with photographer Charter Weeks, titled Prosperity Gospel: Portraits of the Great Recession. From 1984-1999, he was lyricist and lead singer for the nationally acclaimed rock band, The Crystal Zoo. He is currently touring with a supporting combo, The Holy Men, whose album, LIVE at Diana Wortham Theatre, was released in 2011. His award-winning poetry and essays have appeared in many journals and anthologies around the world, including The American Literary Review, The Colorado Review, Poetry Wales, The Cuirt Journal (Ireland), Takahe (New Zealand), Poetry East, The Southern Poetry Anthology, Margie, The Cimarron Review, Rattle, Shenandoah, Word and Witness: 100 Years of NC Poetry, Crazyhorse, and many others. He has been awarded the Sandburg Prize for poetry, a 2013 NC Literary Fellowship, the ASCAP Emerging Songwriter Prize, the Paumanok Poetry Award, and was twice named the Gilbert-Chappell Distinguished Poet for NC. Flynn is founder and managing editor of Asheville Poetry Review, which began publishing in 1994. For more information, please visit: www.ashevillepoetryreview.com.

Debora Kinsland Foerst is a lifelong resident of Cherokee—home of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians—in western North Carolina. She has earned a BSEd in English, an MA in English, an add-on certification in gifted education, and a post-master’s certification in educational leadership. Debora has taught composition and American literature at Western Carolina University, language arts at Cherokee Middle School, and English, publications, and journalism at Cherokee High School. She has also held several administrative positions at Cherokee Central Schools and is currently serving her second year as high school principal. Her poetry has been published in Kakalak, Lights in the Mountains, Echoes Across the Blue Ridge, Appalachian Heritage, the Raleigh News and Observer, and Word and Witness: 100 Years of North Carolina Poetry. Debora lives with her husband and children in the Painttown Community.

Christine Hale’s prose has appeared in Hippocampus, Arts & Letters, Prime Number, Shadowgraph, and The Sun, among other literary journals. Her debut novel Basil’s Dream (Livingston Press, 2009) received honorable mention in the 2010 Library of Virginia Literary Awards. A fellow of MacDowell, Ucross, Hedgebrook, and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, Ms. Hale has been a finalist for the Glimmer Train Short Story Award for New Writers and the Rona Jaffee Foundation Writers’ Award. She earned her MFA from Warren Wilson College, and teaches in the Antioch University-Los Angeles Low-Residency MFA Program as well as the Great Smokies Writing Program. Her new book, A Piece of Sky, A Grain of Rice: A Memoir in Four Meditations (forthcoming from Apprentice House, April 2016) is set in the southern Appalachian Mountains, where she and her parents grew up. She lives in Asheville, where she is director of operations for Urban Dharma, a Buddhist temple and community center.

Luke Hankins is the author of a collection of poems, Weak Devotions, and the editor of Poems of Devotion: An Anthology of Recent Poets (both from Wipf & Stock). A chapbook of his translations of French poems by Stella Vinitchi Radulescu, I Was Afraid of Vowels...Their Paleness, was published by Q Avenue Press in 2011. His latest book, The Work of Creation: Selected Prose, is forthcoming from Wipf & Stock this winter. A graduate of the Indiana University MFA in Creative Writing program, where he held the Yusef Komunyakaa Fellowship in Poetry, Hankins' poems, essays, and translations have appeared in numerous publications, including 32 Poems, American Literary Review, Books & Culture, The Collagist, Contemporary Poetry Review, Image, New England Review, Poetry East, storySouth, Verse Daily, and The Writer's Chronicle, as well as on the American Public Media national radio program "On Being." Hankins serves as Senior Editor at Asheville Poetry Review, where he has been on staff for nine years, and he is the founder and editor of Orison Books, a non-profit literary press focused on the life of the spirit from a broad and inclusive range of perspectives. His website is www.lukehankins.net.

Tommy Hays’ first middle grade novel, What I Came to Tell You, is a VOYA Top Shelf Pick for Middle Grade Fiction 2014, a nominee for the 2015-16 North Carolina Young Adult Award, and a Fall 2013 Okra Pick by the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance. His novel, The Pleasure Was Mine, was a Finalist for the SIBA Fiction Award and has been chosen for numerous community reads. His other novels are Sam’s Crossing and In the Family Way, a Book of the Month Club selection and winner of the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award. He is Executive Director of the Great Smokies Writing Program at UNC Asheville and teaches in the MFA Creative Writing Program at Murray State University. For more information, please go to www.tommyhays.com.

Gary Heidt is a literary agent with Signature Literary Agency and has sold books to imprints at all the major publishers, including Random House, Simon and Schuster, and HarperCollins. Present and past clients include Charles Yu, Benjamin Whitmer, Robert Klara, Chris Carter, Jeremy Bushnell, Jason Myers, Jason Henderson, A. S. King, Deji Olukotun, Arcana Comics, and Platinum Comics. He is also a nationally published poet, playwright, and essayist.

Laura Hope-Gill directs the Thomas Wolfe Center for Narrative at Lenoir-Rhyne University's Asheville campus, and serves as president of the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Advisory Board and on the board of The Thomas Wolfe Society. An NC Arts Fellow for her writings on deafness, she is the subject of a forthcoming documentary on the same topic by filmmakers Houck and K.B. Medford. Her collection of poems, The Soul Tree (Grateful Steps, 2008), dedicated to the Southern Appalachians, prompted the Blue Ridge Parkway Foundation to name her its first poet laureate in 2010, and her two books of Asheville's architectural history received awards from the North Carolina Society of Historians. She is developing her memoir about her grandmother's stories of being in a Japanese prison camp in World War II, while working with Mission Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and a network of healthcare providers to develop Narrative practice in health.

Deborah (Dee) James has taught at the University of North Carolina at Asheville (UNCA) for the past thirty years. She has a long, consuming interest in stories of all types—written, oral, performed—reflected in both her undergraduate training in Literature and Language and Drama as well as her professional work as a teacher of composition and Literature (primarily African American, African and American). From the work that her first year students do crafting work using the Storycorps.org model or their own micro and auto-ethnographies to learning to critically read and interpret stories from their own and others’ cultures, Dr. James is interested in exploring how and why stories are crafted and what they mean, personally, culturally, and socially. She is convinced that sharing our stories has the greatest potential for helping us understand each other and the multiple worlds and identities we inhabit.

Jeremy B. Jones is the author of Bearwallow: A Personal History of a Mountain Homeland, winner of the Gold Medal for autobiography/memoir in the 2015 Independent Publisher Book awards. His essays appear in Oxford American, The Iowa Review, and Brevity, among others, and have twice been named Notable in Best American Essays. He received his MFA from the University of Iowa and teaches creative writing at Western Carolina University.

Stephen Kirk is the editor of Voices from the Outer Banks and the author of First in Flight: The Wright Brothers in North Carolina and Scribblers: Stalking the Authors of Appalachia. He has also contributed to Travel North Carolina and Sports in the Carolinas and has been reprinted in Best American Short Stories. The editor at John F. Blair, Publisher, since 1988, he lives near Winston-Salem.

John Lane is the author of a dozen books of poetry and prose. His latest is a novel from USC Press, Fate Moreland's Widow. His Abandoned Quarry: New & Selected Poems was released by Mercer University Press in 2012. The book includes much of Lane’s published poetry over the past thirty years, plus a selection of new poems, and won the SIBA Poetry Book of the Year prize. His other prose works include My Paddle to the Sea, published 2011 by The University of Georgia Press, and Begin with Rock, End with Water, out this past September from Mercer University Press. He teaches environmental studies at Wofford College.

Vicki Lane is the author of The Day of Small Things and of the Elizabeth Goodweather Appalachian Mysteries: Signs in the Blood, Art’s Blood, Old Wounds (Book Sense Notable, SIBA Book Award Nominee), In a Dark Season (Romantic Times Nominee for Best Contemporary Mystery and Suspense Novel, Anthony nominee for Best Paperback Original) and Under the Skin. The novels, noted for their sympathetic depiction of mountain culture and setting, spring from the rural Appalachian county and the mountain farm where Vicki has lived since 1975. Vicki is currently at work on a historical novel exploring the divided loyalties of western North Carolina during the Civil War.

Nicki Leone showed her proclivities at a young age when she asked her parents if she could exchange a gift of jewelry for a hardcover Merriam-Webster. Later, her college career and attending loans supported her predilection for working as a bookseller. Currently she works with the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance, developing marketing and outreach programs for independent bookstores. She has been a book reviewer for local magazines and newspapers, and the on-air book commentator for her local public radio and television stations. She is a contributing writer for Bloom, an online magazine about writers who published their first book after the age of forty. She is also past president and a current member of the board of the North Carolina Writers’ Network. She lives near Wilmington, with a varying numbers of dogs and cats.

Neeti Madan has been an agent with Sterling Lord Literistic for fifteen years. She represents a wide range of authors, among them #1 New York Times bestsellers Lisa Lillien and Jenny Lawson, Container Store Founder and CEO Kip Tindell, biographer Gretchen Holbrook Gerzina, and award-winning novelist Tommy Hays. Her books run the gamut from the commercial to the cerebral, and she represents both adult and young adult fiction. Neeti is also drawn to memoir, journalism, popular culture, lifestyle, women’s issues, multicultural books, and virtually any intelligent writing on intriguing topics. She is always on the lookout for the types of books she loves as a reader—page turners that keep her up until 3:00 am, thoughtful writing on important issues that interest her, and irreverent books that make her laugh.

Brent Martin is the author of three chapbook collections of poetry: Poems from Snow Hill Road (New Native Press, 2007), A Shout in the Woods (Flutter Press, 2010), and Staring the Red Earth Down (Red Bird Press, 2014), and is a co-author of Every Breath Sings Mountains (Voices from the American Land, 2011) with authors Barbara Duncan and Thomas Rain Crowe He is also the author of Hunting for Camellias at Horseshoe Bend, a nonfiction chapbook published by Red Bird Press in 2015. His poetry and essays have been published in the North Carolina Literary Review, Pisgah Review, Tar River Poetry, Chattahoochee Review, Eno Journal, New Southerner, Kudzu Literary Journal, Smoky Mountain News, and elsewhere. He lives in the Cowee community in western North Carolina and is currently serving as the Gilbert-Chappell Distinguished Poet for the West.

Joy Neaves is a teacher, editor, administrator, and mother of two, with more than fifteen years of experience as an editor of children’s literature, first from Front Street, an award-winning publisher of books for children, and later at Boyds Mills Press. She is currently a freelance editor of children's books at namelos. She has taught for the Great Smokies Writing Program, the Highlights Foundation, the North Carolina Humanities Council, the namelos writers workshop, and has presented at the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators conferences. She enjoys helping writers hone their work, with an eye toward publication. She has helped many writers see their books come to fruition.

Heather Newton’s debut novel Under the Mercy Trees (HarperCollins 2011) won the 2011 Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award, was chosen by the Women’s National Book Association as a Great Group Reads Selection, and named an “Okra Pick” by the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance (“great southern fiction fresh off the vine”). She teaches creative writing for the Great Smokies Writing Program and is a founding member of the Flatiron Writers, a writers’ collective which sponsors workshops, salons, and other events for the western North Carolina literary community. Her Asheville law practice focuses on employment law, employee benefits, and business advice for writers, artists, and entrepreneurs: www.heathernewton.net.

Catherine Reid is on the faculty at Warren Wilson College, where she specializes in creative nonfiction and environmental writing. A recipient of recent fellowships from the North Carolina Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts, she is the author of two works of creative nonfiction—Falling into Place: An Intimate Geography of Home (Beacon Press) and Coyote: Seeking the Hunter in Our Midst (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). Her essays have also appeared in such literary journals as Georgia Review, Fourth Genre, Massachusetts Review, Under the Sun, and Bellevue Literary Review. More information can be found at www.catherinereid.org.

Megan Shepherd is the author of many works for young people, including The Madman's Daughter series and The Cage series, as well as the forthcoming The Secret Horses of Briar Hill. Her works have been translated into eight languages, and The Madman's Daughter was optioned for film and won the NC Book Award for Young Adult Literature. Born in Brevard, and raised in her parents’ independent bookstore, she now lives on an old dairy farm outside of Asheville.

Lee Smith is the author of seventeen works of fiction including Fair and Tender Ladies, Oral History, and her most recent novel, Guests on Earth. She has received many awards including the North Carolina Award for Literature and an Academy Award in Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters; her novel The Last Girls was a New York Times bestseller as well as winner of the Southern Book Critics Circle Award. She was inducted into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame in 2008. Dimestore, a collection of personal essays, will be published in 2016.

Katherine Soniat’sseventh collection, Bright Stranger, is forthcoming from LSU Press, spring 2016. The Swing Girl (LSU Press) was selected as Best Collection of 2011 by the Poetry Council of North Carolina. A chapbook, The Goodbye Animals, recently received the Turtle Island Quarterly Award. A Shared Life won The Iowa Prize for Poetry. Poems have appeared in World Poetry Portfolio #60, Hotel Amerika, Threepenny Review, The Nation, storySouth, and Connotations Press. She was on the faculty at Virginia Tech, Hollins University, and teaches in the Great Smokies Writers Program at UNC-Asheville. Website: www.katherinesoniat.com.

Betsy Teter is a founder and executive director of the Hub City Writers Project of Spartanburg, SC, which serves readers and writers through its independent small press, community bookshop, and diverse literary programming. Since 1995, Hub City Press has published more than seventy titles by Southern writers and sold more than 120,000 books. Hub City also operates the city’s independent bookstore, Hub City Bookshop, which hosts dozens of readings, workshops and other events each year. The organization also runs The Writers House residency program and hosts the Writing in Place summer writers’ conference. Betsy holds a BA in History from Wake Forest University. Prior to helping found the Writers Project, she was a journalist for fifteen years and served as business editor and columnist for the Spartanburg Herald-Journal. She is married to author John Lane, an English and Environmental Studies Professor at Wofford College. They have two sons, Rob and Russell.

 

 

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Support for the 2015 Fall Conference is provided by the NC Arts CouncilAl Manning, Alice Osborn (AliceOsborn.com): Write from the Inside Out, Lenoir-Rhyne University MA in Writing Program, The Thomas Wolfe Memorial State Historic Site, Western Carolina University MA in Professional Writing Program, WCQS Western North Carolina Public Radio, Robert Beatty: Disney-Hyperion Author of Serafina and the Black Cloak, and the William M. Hendricks Family Foundation.

 

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