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NCWN 2010 SPRING CONFERENCE
ELLIOTT UNIVERSITY CENTER, UNC GREENSBORO
SATURDAY, APRIL 24, 2010

Fred ChappellThe North Carolina Writers' Network and the Center for Creative Writing in the Arts bring you a full day of workshops on the campus of the University of North Carolina-Greensboro. We're giving you more of what you've asked for -- small classes, top writing faculty, and intensive workshops in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, screenwriting, and publishing.

Keynote: Fred Chappell

Register Online | Download a Registration Form (pdf)
*online registration closed. Walk in registration available on Saturday, April 24th.

Spring Conference 2010 is made possible with support from the Center for Creative Writing in the Arts, UNC-Greensboro, and the North Carolina Arts Council.
UNC GreensboroNC Arts Council


Conference Classes

Register Online | Download a Registration Form (pdf)
*online registration closed. Walk in registration available on Saturday, April 24th.

 

All-Day Workshops

  • The Story and the Other Story: Getting at Fictional Subtext with Holly Goddard Jones (Fiction) *this session is closed*
  • The Well-Crafted Essay with Cynthia Nearman (Nonfiction)

Intensive Half-Day Workshops with

Choose one of the all-day workshops, which meet in the morning and resume after lunch.

Or

Choose from among the half-day workshops and select one class for the morning session and another class for the afternoon session.

Either way,

  • Registration from 8:00 - 9:00 am
  • Morning sessions from 9:00 - 10:30 am
  • Keynote Reading from 10:45 - 11:45 *Open to the Public!
  • Lunch with an Author! - Keep the conversations going 12:00 - 1:00 pm
  • Faculty Readings 1:00 - 2:00 pm
  • Afternoon sessions from 2:30 - 4:00 pm
  • Publishing Panel from 4:00 - 5:00 pm *Open to the Public!
  • Open-Mike readings, 5:00 - 6:00 pm
  • Publisher Exhibits open all day

See the full schedule for more information about the day's activities.

Register Online | Download a Registration Form (pdf)
*online registration closed. Walk in registration available on Saturday, April 24th.

 


Costs

Early registration ends Friday, April 16. Members may register on-site April 24 for $135.

Early registration:

  • $99 for members
  • $150 for non-members
  • $174 for 1 Year membership + registration
On-site registration as a walk-in:
  • $135 for members
  • $165 for non-members

Register Online | Download a Registration Form (pdf)
*online registration closed. Walk in registration available on Saturday, April 24th.

 

Scholarships

If you would like to apply for a scholarship, please send a C.V. and a letter of interest to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Cancellations

Cancellations must be made in writing and arrive at the Network office by 4 pm, Friday, April 16, for you to receive a 50% refund. Send request to NC Writers' Network, Box 954, Carrboro, NC 27510.

No refunds for cancellations received after April 15 or for no-shows.

Nearby Hotels

For favorable rates at the following hotels, mention that you are attending an event at the University of North Carolina-Greensboro.


Faculty Biographies: Spring Conference 2010

Register Online | Download a Registration Form (pdf)
*online registration closed. Walk in registration available on Saturday, April 24th.

 

Keynote

Fred Chappell In 2004, Fred Chappell retired after forty years in the English department of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. During this time he published twenty-six books of poetry, fiction, and critical commentary. His awards include the Sir Walter Raleigh Prize, the North Carolina Award in Literature, the T. S. Eliot Prize, the Bollingen Prize in Poetry, eight Roanoke-Chowan Poetry Awards, the Prix de Meilleur des Livres Etrangers (Best Foreign Book Prize) from the Academie Francaise, the Mihai Eminescu Medal from the Republic of Moldova, and the Thomas Wolfe Prize. He was inducted into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame in 2006. He served as North Carolina’s Poet Laureate from 1997 until 2002, and in that capacity visited more than 250 schools, colleges, universities, retirement homes, churches, and other venues. His latest book of poetry is Shadow Box, published in 2009 by LSU Press. His latest work of fiction, Ancestors and Others: New and Selected Stories, was published last year by St. Martin’s Press. He lives with his wife, Susan, in Greensboro.

Spring Conference Faculty

Malcolm CampbellMalcolm Campbell is the author of two adventure travel guidebooks, editor of professional golf instructor Dana Rader’s golf instructional book, Rock Solid Golf, and founder of the independent publishing house Walkabout Press. In Campbell’s twenty years as a commercial writer, he’s written everything from power-tool-accessory catalogues to television commercials to cover/feature stories for national magazines. Campbell is the 2008 recipient of the Doris Betts Fiction Prize, and he teaches in UNC Charlotte’s freshman writing program.

Keith FlynnKeith Flynn (www.keithflynn.net) is the author of five books, including four collections of poetry: The Talking Drum (1991), The Book of Monsters (1994), The Lost Sea (2000), and The Golden Ratio (Iris Press, 2007), and a collection of essays, entitled The Rhythm Method, Razzmatazz and Memory: How To Make Your Poetry Swing (Writer's Digest Books, 2007). From 1987 to 1998, he was lyricist and lead singer for the nationally acclaimed rock band The Crystal Zoo. His poetry has appeared in many journals and anthologies around the world, including the Colorado Review, Poetry Wales, The Cuirt Journal (Ireland), Takahe (New Zealand), the Southern Poetry Review, Margie, Rattle, Shenandoah, Word and Witness: 100 Years of NC Poetry, Crazyhorse, and many others. He has been awarded the Sandburg Prize for poetry, the ASCAP Emerging Songwriter Prize, and the Paumanok Poetry Award and was twice named the Gilbert-Chappell Distinguished Poet for North Carolina. Flynn is founder and managing editor of the Asheville Poetry Review. For more information, please visit //www.ashevillereview.com.

Nathan Ross Freeman Award-winning scriptwriter, filmmaker, and creative writing and spoken-word educator Nathan Ross Freeman was awarded 2007 B.E.S.T. Outstanding Faculty as a member of the intensive writing faculty teaching screenwriting/playwriting at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. He was the 2008–09 visiting writer at Salem College teaching upper-level screenwriting, introduction and intermediate poetry, and creative writing. Freeman was a finalist adjudicator for the 2009 North Carolina Arts Council Playwright/Screenwriter Fellowship. He is the writer, director, and producer of the feature film Mr. Bones, which earned five invitations and won five first-place national and international film festival awards. Freeman is the compiler and editor for the feature documentary Authoring Action, selected by ten U.S. and eight overseas 2010 pending national and international film festivals.

Holly Goddard JonesHolly Goddard Jones is the author of Girl Trouble (Harper Perennial), a collection of short stories. Her fiction has appeared in Best American Mystery Stories, New Stories from the South, and various literary journals. She teaches in the MFA program in creative writing at UNC Greensboro.

Sheila Smith McKoy is a native of Raleigh. She has taught in a variety of educational environments, including St. Augustine’s College, Duke University, North Carolina State University, the North Carolina Correctional Center for Women, and Vanderbilt University, where she received tenure. Smith McKoy’s critical and creative work hasappeared in numerous publications, including the critically acclaimed Schomburg series African American Women Writers 1910–1940, Callaloo, Mythium, Obsidian, and Research for African Literatures. Her book, When Whites Riot: Writing Race and Violence in American and South African Cultures (University of Wisconsin Press, 2001) has received critical attention in the United States and in South Africa. The book was the featured topic of an interview on Cape Town’s Bush Radio (2001) and was the subject of a National Public Television interview on John Seigenthaler’s A Word on Words (2003). Currently an associate professor of English at NCSU, Smith McKoy directs the Africana Studies Program and is the editor of Obsidian: Literature in the African Diaspora. She writes critical essays, fiction, and poetry and is a Reiki master/teacher.

John McNally John McNally is author of three novels (After the Workshop, America's Report Card, and The Book of Ralph) and two story collections (Ghosts of Chicago and Troublemakers). His nonfiction book, The Creative Writer's Survival Guide: Advice from an Unrepentant Novelist, will be published this fall by the University of Iowa Press. He is an associate professor at Wake Forest University.
Cynthia Nearman has been the writing director at Guilford College in Greensboro since 2004. She teaches first-year writing, creative nonfiction, travel writing, rhetoric and composition, and contemporary American literature. Since spring 2009 she has served as creative nonfiction editor of storySouth. As a writer she works in various genres—academic scholarship, cultural commentary, and personal essays—focusing mostly on things like literacy, racism, and love. Her husband is a magician, and they live in a happy little cottage with their two yellow dogs and one bossy cat.

Scott OwensAuthor of five collections of poetry, Scott Owens is editor of Wild Goose Poetry Review, author of “Musings” (a weekly column on poetry), founder of Poetry Hickory, vice president of the Poetry Council of North Carolina, and a writer of reviews of contemporary poetry. His work has received awards from the Pushcart Prize Anthology, the Academy of American Poets, the North Carolina Writers’ Network, the North Carolina Poetry Society, and the Poetry Society of South Carolina. Born in Greenwood, South Carolina, he has lived in North Carolina for the past twenty-five years and currently teaches at Catawba Valley Community College.

Chris Roerden In her forty-four years in publishing, Chris Roerden has edited authors published by St. Martin’s, Berkley Prime Crime, Intrigue, Rodale, Viking, Midnight Ink, and many others. She’s also written a game and eleven books, including two national-award winners to help writers get published: Don’t Murder Your Mystery(Agatha Award) andDon’t Sabotage Your Submission (Benjamin Franklin Award). Chris is past president of a trade association of commercial and university presses, former board member of SE Mystery Writers of America, and long-time member of Sisters in Crime, Publishers Marketing Association, and Mensa. She has taught writing at universities from Maine to Wisconsin and is sought after to present writers’ workshops coast to coast.
Ed Southern is a North Carolina native and a graduate of Wake Forest University. His nonfiction work includes The Jamestown Adventure: Accounts of the Virginia Colony, 1605-1614; Voices of the American Revolution in the Carolinas; and Sports in the Carolinas. His first work of fiction, Parlous Angels, was published in the fall of 2009. He has been executive director of the North Carolina Writers’ Network since January 2008, after more than eight years with John F. Blair, Publisher. He lives in Winston-Salem.
 
 

 


FULL CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Register Online | Download a Registration Form (pdf)
*online registration closed. Walk in registration available on Saturday, April 24th.

 

8:00–9:00 am
Registration

8:00 am–6:00 pm
Exhibitor Tables open

9:00–10:30 am
The Story and the Other Story: Getting at Fictional Subtext (All-Day Fiction)*this session is closed*
Holly Goddard Jones
We can probably all agree that good fiction does more than one thing at once. It is layered, complex. It leaves something to reader interpretation. But getting at subtext doesn't have to mean sacrificing rich storytelling, and in fact, the two ought to go together. In this workshop, we'll talk about different kinds of fictional conflict, both concrete and abstract, and some practical methods for discovering that "other" story: the one beneath the surface (like seven-eighths of Hemingway's iceberg) or between the lines.

The Well-Crafted Essay (All-Day Nonfiction)
Cynthia Nearman
Part I: Structure and Movement
The first part of this workshop will focus on planning and developing a meaningful overall structure for personal essays on a wide range of subjects. We will examine several examples of well-crafted essays to discover the relationship between an essay’s pattern of organization and its ability to sustain and heighten a sense of energy as it moves readers from scene to scene. Participants will engage in planning activities for works still in the idea stage, as well as activities designed to sharpen the structure and movement in existing original works.

Show or Tell? What's the Real Difference, and When Do I Use Each? (Fiction)
Chris Roerden
The second-most common comment scrawled on rejected manuscripts (when comments appear at all) is: “Show, don't tell.” Do you know exactly what to do? Where? And when? Enjoy interactive exercises that show, not tell, how you can learn to use this essential fiction-writing skill most effectively.

The North Carolina Screenwriter, and Screenwriter as Filmmaker
Nathan Ross Freeman
North Carolina is quickly becoming the premiere state for writing and producing the independent feature film. In this digital age, the window is open for the screenwriter to self-manage the development of your screenplay, from script to distribution, and earn a film quality that will allow your screenplay as a film to compete for national and international distribution. Nathan Ross Freeman, the director of the award-winning feature film Mr. Bones, shares his experience from the stem to the stern as a screenwriter and as a North Carolina filmmaker. We will explore beginner and advanced tenets of writing and developing your script for film; creating an LLC to film your script; developing capital to finance the independent filming of your script; producing the film of your script; directing the independent film of your script; and script development: preproduction, production, postproduction, festivals, and distribution.

Inspiration Station (Poetry)
Keith Flynn
The photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson believed that his lens had to be aimed at the decisive moment, when the photograph was willing to surrender or when the confluence of events was at its apex. Most professional writers can’t wait for inspiration to strike, or for the abiding image or core theme of the work to emerge. This workshop will focus on identifying ideas and rhythms to jumpstart the creative process, with exercises designed to spark the imagination. Participants should bring at least one poem for the group to discuss and twenty copies of the manuscript. Any work deemed exemplary will be considered for publication in the Asheville Poetry Review.

Gimme a Break: Breaking Into Nonfiction Publishing
Malcolm Campbell
Writers are people who write; authors are writers who’ve published. The difference is insignificant to our intrinsic worth; however, we write to be read. So how do you break into nonfiction publication? This workshop will examine simple but effective steps to deliver your idea or finished piece from “your eyes only” to both online and print readership. With your first break, you’ll have experience to turn into bigger and better publishing opportunities. We’ll examine such nonfiction genres as feature stories, interviews, reviews, essays, and first-person accounts in such categories as travel, health, fitness, food, senior living, parenting, finance, the arts, and more. Bring your ideas, and we’ll brainstorm publishing opportunities together.

10:45–11:45 am
Keynote Reading by Fred Chappell

Noon–1:00 pm
Lunch with an Author (or on your own)
Sign-up available at Conference Registration Table

1:00–2:00 pm
Faculty Readings

2:30–4:00 pm
The Story and the Other Story: Getting at Fictional Subtext (All-Day Fiction)*this session is closed*
Holly Goddard Jones
We can probably all agree that good fiction does more than one thing at once. It is layered, complex. It leaves something to reader interpretation. But getting at subtext doesn't have to mean sacrificing rich storytelling, and in fact, the two ought to go together. In this workshop, we'll talk about different kinds of fictional conflict, both concrete and abstract, and some practical methods for discovering that "other" story: the one beneath the surface (like seven-eighths of Hemingway's iceberg) or between the lines.

The Well-Crafted Essay (All-Day Nonfiction)
Cynthia Nearman
Part II: Voice and Verbs, Distance and Time
In the second part of this workshop, we’ll examine techniques for moving readers between vivid, in-the-moment scenes or action sequences and the reflective theme-and-wondering-and-idea sections that deepen a sense of intimacy in personal essays and short memoirs. Participants will create playful imitations of passages from published works and consider the ways skillful essayists use verbs (and nouns) to alter and intensify readers’ experiences of both events and ideas.

It's Happening Right Now!: How to Create Immediacy in Fiction
John McNally
This workshop will explore the craft issues related to creating immediacy in fiction as well as all those pesky tics that distance the reader from the story.

The Greatest Writing Prompt Ever (Poetry)
Scott Owens
Scott Owens, author of five collections of poetry and editor of Wild Goose Poetry Review, will share and illustrate generative strategies to get you writing and keep you writing for years to come. While intended for poets, these strategies will work just as well for writers of fiction and creative nonfiction.

The Morning After: Reclaiming Your Life as a Writer (All Genres)
Sheila Smith McKoy
At some point in our writing lives, we have all had to take time away from the work that sustains us. Yet, when it’s time to put paper to pen again, sometimes it is difficult to re-create your writing life. This workshop is designed for any writer who needs assistance to start writing again. Participants will learn ten easy steps to restart their writing lives. These ten salient steps will help any writer who has been out of the writer’s life for any length of time to begin anew. Participants may bring works in progress as well as thoughts about the progress they aren’t making on specific projects. The objective of the workshop is to enable participants to set—and to meet—goals in their writing lives.

Honesty Is the Best Policy: The Basics of Writing Nonfiction
Ed Southern

Fiction writers can shape a story and its elements any way they want to-compress time, make up characters and events, move mountains. Nonfiction writers have to stick to facts, while still trying to tell an engaging story. This workshop will discuss some basic approaches to turning the real world's messiness into a clear, compelling story.

4:00–5:00 pm
Publishing Panel
Moderated by Ed Southern

5:00–6:00 pm
Open Mike Readings
Sign-up available at Conference Registration Table


Spring Conference 2010 Schedule at a Glance

Register Online | Download a Registration Form (pdf)
*online registration closed. Walk in registration available on Saturday, April 24th.

 

Saturday, April 25
8:00 - 9:00am Registration
Exhibit Tables and Book Sales (open from 8:00 am - 6:00 pm)
9:00 - 10:30am

Morning Classes:

  • The Story and the Other Story: Getting at Fictional Subtext (All-Day Fiction)*this session is closed*
    Holly Goddard Jones
  • The Well-Crafted Essay (All-Day Nonfiction)
    Cynthia Nearman
    Part I: Structure and Movement
  • Show or Tell? What's the Real Difference, and When Do I Use Each? (Fiction)
    Chris Roerden
  • The North Carolina Screenwriter, and Screenwriter as Filmmaker
    Nathan Ross Freeman
  • Inspiration Station (Poetry)
    Keith Flynn
  • Gimme a Break: Breaking Into Nonfiction Publishing
    Malcolm Campbell
10:45am - 11:45pm

Keynote Reading - Fred Chappell

12:00 - 1:00pm Lunch on your own OR "Lunch with an Author": A new chance for the Network to network. From 8 - 9 am, registrants can sign up to join a group of no more than 10 who will take one of our faculty members out to lunch for some good company and informal conversation. Participants will split the cost of their author's lunch, as well as paying for their own meal.

Elliott Center Food Court and Commons
Link: http://euc.uncg.edu/services/foodcourt/
Exhibit Tables Open, Book Sales
1:00 - 2:00pm Faculty Readings
2:30 - 4:00pm

Afternoon Classes

  • The Story and the Other Story: Getting at Fictional Subtext (All-Day Fiction)*this session is closed*
    Holly Goddard Jones
  • The Well-Crafted Essay (All-Day Nonfiction)
    Cynthia Nearman
    Part II: Voice and Verbs, Distance and Time
  • It's Happening Right Now!: How to Create Immediacy in Fiction
    John McNally
  • The Greatest Writing Prompt Ever (Poetry)
    Scott Owens
  • The Morning After: Reclaiming Your Life as a Writer (All Genres)
    Sheila Smith McKoy
  • Honesty Is the Best Policy: The Basics of Writing Nonfiction
    Ed Southern
4:00 - 5:00pm Publishing Panel
5:00 - 6:00pm Open Mic Readings
 
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