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William Peace UniversityRALEIGH, NC—Whether you want to write hard-nose, investigative journalism or you're working on a buttery memoir about being raised on a dairy farm, rendering truth is the key to writing effective and powerful creative nonfiction. This summer, writers will have the chance to spend fifteen workshop hours with former Piedmont Laureate Scott Huler, refining the key principles of the genre and improving their craft in a focused, residency-style learning environment.

The 2014 Squire Summer Writing Residency will be held July 10-13 on the campus of William Peace University in Raleigh. Registration is now open.

"In nonfiction, good writing begins with good reporting, progresses through rigorous thinking, and comes into being through disciplined writing and fierce, unsentimental revision," says Huler, who will lead the workshop in creative nonfiction. "That doesn’t mean you can’t write an emotional, sepiatone reminiscence of the smell of your Aunt Sophie’s pound cake, it just means you’ll need to understand where your information comes from and what you’re trying to say, and you’ll need to be willing to work hard enough to keep at it until you’ve said exactly what you mean.

"We’ll talk about telling true stories so they engage the reader, satisfy the writer, inform the cultural conversation—and above all remain true. We’ll work on personal memoir, descriptive prose, highly reported documentary-style narrative, and whimsical, voicey short essays. We’ll keep our hands busy in class by doing exercises and sharing them, and we’ll try to emerge with at least one small finished piece by the end of the weekend. Come prepared to write, to read, and to fool around."

Scott HulerHuler has written six books of creative nonfiction, most recently On the Grid (Rodale, 2010), about the infrastructure systems that make our world work. He has written about everything from the death penalty to bikini waxing (he likes to say he is for one and against the other), with his essays and reporting appearing in newspapers like the New York Times, Washington Post, and Los Angeles Times; in magazines like ESPN, Backpacker, and Forbes; and on websites like Scientific American and Grist. His radio work has been heard on “All Things Considered” on NPR and “Marketplace” and “The Splendid Table” on PRI. He contributes writing and video regularly to Our State and Walter magazines and was the 2011 Piedmont Laureate in creative nonfiction.

The Squire Summer Writing Residency offers an intensive course in a chosen genre (fiction, creative nonfiction, or poetry), with fifteen hours of workshop sessions over the four days of the program. Registrants work in-depth on their own writing, as well as their colleagues’, while also studying the principles of the genre with their instructor. Other features include faculty readings, panel discussions, and open mic sessions for residents.

Admission is limited to the first fifty registrants. And while workshops are at the heart of the conference programming, the weekend is a “residency” in the sense that attendees will enjoy meals together and have the option of staying overnight in on-campus accommodations. Free WiFi and parking are available.

Plus, conference-goers will benefit from being a short walk from many historical and cultural sites in downtown Raleigh. Karen Wells, Executive Director of ARTS North Carolina, will lead a Table Talk in a special program on Friday night.

Registration for the 2014 Squire Summer Writing Residency is now open.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

Maggie MorganDURHAM, NC—The North Carolina Writers' Network is pleased to welcome Maggie Morgan as the new Membership Coordinator.

After a brief post-college fling with Oxford, Mississippi, Maggie accidentally settled down in Durham eleven years ago. She lives near downtown with her partner of six years and two handsome cats just barely old enough to not be kittens anymore.

Only a week ago, she finished her Masters in English at North Carolina Central University, an experience that was both challenging and fulfilling. With the amount of free time that finishing school has opened up, she plans to conquer her epic list of things to do which includes taking on some craft projects, writing a novel, and finally learning to cook, as well as conquering several shelves of books that have been waiting too long to be read.

As the Membership Coordinator, Maggie is the “front line” for all membership contact with the Network. All membership questions, complaints, donor inquiries, and more should be directed to:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 919-308-3228

She is available by phone between the hours of 11:00 am and 1:00 pm, Monday-Friday. If you aren't able to call during this time, leave a message, and she will get back to you as soon as possible.

“We're thrilled Maggie has decided to join us,” said Executive Director Ed Southern. “We hope the addition of a Membership Coordinator will allow us to expand our programs and services—and enhance the quality of those programs and services for all of our members—for years to come.”

If handling customer relations for 1,200 writers sounds daunting, Maggie is up for the challenge. She's no stranger to Herculean tasks.

As an intern with Oxford American magazine, she was directed to secure the rights for what she describes as “The Holy Grail” of unpublished manuscripts: a vampire screenplay written by none other than William Faulkner.

“It was a rite of passage with the magazine,” Maggie explained, “for the editor to assign difficult, sometimes seemingly impossible, tasks to the interns."

But Maggie stubbornly called around and found a provision that allowed the screenplay to see the light of day. The magazine was able to secure the rights to publish an excerpt of the screenplay after a bit of nuanced negotiation with the Faulkner estate. The vampire screenplay ran in Oxford American in January of 2002.

Questions about what you've read here? Call Maggie.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

Scott HulerRALEIGH, NC—The 2014 Squire Summer Writing Residency will be held July 10-13 on the campus of William Peace University in Raleigh. Registration is now open.

The Squire Summer Writing Residency offers an intensive course in a chosen genre (fiction, creative nonfiction, or poetry), with fifteen hours of workshop sessions over the four days of the program. Registrants work in-depth on their own writing, as well as their colleagues’, while also studying the principles of the genre with their instructor. Other features include faculty readings, panel discussions, and open mic sessions for residents.

“The Squire Summer Writing Residency may be the most fun the Network has,” NCWN executive director Ed Southern said. “Registrants tend to form close bonds that last long after the Residency is over.”

Former Piedmont Laureate Scott Huler will lead the track in Creative Nonfiction. He has written six books of creative nonfiction, most recently On the Grid (Rodale, 2010), about the infrastructure systems that make our world work. He has written about everything from the death penalty to bikini waxing (he likes to say he is for one and against the other), with his essays and reporting appearing in newspapers like the New York Times, Washington Post, and Los Angeles Times and in magazines like ESPN, Backpacker, and Forbes. He contributes writing and video regularly to Our State and Walter magazines.

Randall KenanRandall Kenan, a professor of English and comparative literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will lead the fiction workshop. He is the author of a novel, A Visitation of Spirits; two works of nonfiction, Walking on Water: Black American Lives at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century and The Fire This Time; and a collection of stories, Let the Dead Bury Their Dead. Among his awards are a Guggenheim Fellowship, The Whiting Writers’ Award, the North Carolina Award, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters’ Rome Prize.

Shelby Stephenson, who will be inducted into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame in October, will lead the poetry workshop. He has published many collections of poems, plus the poetic documentary Plankhouse (with photos by Roger Manley). Shelby is former editor of Pembroke Magazine. His Family Matters: Homage to July, the Slave Girl won the 2008 Bellday Poetry Prize, judged by Allen Grossman. Stephenson’s latest collection, The Hunger of Freedom (2014), is from Red Dashboard.

Shelby StephensonAdmission is limited to the first fifty registrants. And while workshops are at the heart of the conference programming, the weekend is a “residency” in the sense that attendees will enjoy meals together and have the option of staying overnight in on-campus accommodations. Free WiFi and parking are available.

Plus, conference-goers will benefit from being a short walk from many historical and cultural sites in downtown Raleigh. Karen Wells, Executive Director of ARTS North Carolina, will lead a Table Talk in a special program on Friday night.

Registration for the 2014 Squire Summer Writing Residency is open now.

The nonprofit North Carolina Writers’ Network is the state’s oldest and largest literary arts services organization devoted to writers at all stages of development. For additional information, visit www.ncwriters.org.

 

 
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