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North Carolina Writers' Network Fall Conference 2010

Friday, November 5 through Sunday, November 7

Omni Charlotte Hotel
132 East Trade Street
Charlotte, NC 28202
704-377-0400
www.omnihotels.com/FindAHotel/Charlotte.aspx

(Use “North Carolina Writers’ Network” for special conference rates.)

Featuring Master Classes, more than thirty Classes and Workshops, Critique Service, Manuscript Mart, Faculty Readings, and Exhibits.

Register online here | Download a registration form

Fees and Important Dates | Complete Schedule-at-a-Glance
Faculty Bios
Highlights | Class and Workshop Schedule and Descriptions
Session I | Session II | Session III | Session IV |Session V
Master Classes
Manuscript Mart
Critique Service

Conference Fees

Register online here | Download a registration form

Early registration: On-site registration as a walk-in:

Member Rates

  • $250 (includes meals)
  • $200 (without meals)
  • $200 (Saturday only, with meals)
  • $100 (Sunday only, without meals)

Nonmember Rates

  • $350 (includes meals)
  • $300 (without meals)
  • $300 (Saturday only, with meals)
  • $200 (Sunday only, without meals)

Other Fees

  • $30 for a Master Class
  • $150 for Manuscript Mart
  • $150 for Critique Service
  • $400 for members and nonmembers (does not include meals)

 

Refunds and Cancellations

Cancellations must be made in writing and arrive at the Network by 5:00 pm on October 29, 2010, for you to receive a refund of the registration fee, less $150. No-shows or cancellations after October 29 are nonrefundable.

Manuscript Mart, Critique Service, and Master Class fees are not refundable if you cancel. However, if we are not able to find a place for you in the Manuscript Mart or Critique Service, we will return your check(s) for related extra charge(s).

Master Class application fees are nonrefundable, as they are administrative charges.
Send all refund requests to NC Writers' Network Refund, PO Box 21591, Winston-Salem, NC 27120.


Important Dates

October 15

Deadline to reserve hotel rooms at low conference rate (Please call the Omni Charlotte at 1-800-THE-OMNI or visit their Web site to make your reservation, using “North Carolina Writers' Network” as your code.)

October 18 Postmark deadline for signing up for Master Class (see guidelines)
October 18 Postmark deadline for Manuscript Mart submissions (see guidelines)
October 18 Postmark deadline for Critique Service submissions (see guidelines)
October 29 Deadline for conference registration (5:00 pm by phone or mail; midnight if registering online)
November 5 – 7 Walk-in registration available on-site ($400, meals not included)
November 5 – 7 Conference in session

Complete Schedule-at-a-Glance

Register online here | Download a registration form

Friday, November 5 through Sunday, November 7

Friday, November 5

5:00 – 9:00 pm...........Registration, Exhibitor Tables, and Book Sales Tables open
7:00 – 8:00 pm...........Welcome Reception
8:00 – 9:00 pm...........Keynote Address by Michael Malone
9:00 – 10:00 pm.........Book Signing and Reception

Saturday, November 6

7:30 – 9:00 am...........Continental Breakfast available
8:00 am – 7:30 pm.......Registration, Exhibitor Tables, and Book Sales Tables open
8:00 – 9:00 am...........Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: The Past, Present, and Future of Writing in North Carolina
9:00 am – 5:00 pm.......Manuscript Mart* and Critique Service*
9:00 – 10:30 am.........Session I Workshop Classes
10:30 – 11:00 am........Break
11:00 am – 12:30 pm....Session II Workshop Classes and Session I Master Classes*
12:30 – 1:30 pm..........Luncheon with Literary Trails of the North Carolina Piedmont
1:30 – 2:30 pm...........Network Town Hall Meeting
2:00 – 3:00 pm...........Literary Walking Tour with Georgann Eubanks
2:30 – 3:00 pm...........Break
3:00 – 4:30 pm...........Session III Workshop Classes and Session II Master Classes*
4:30 – 5:00 pm...........Break
5:00 – 6:00 pm...........Faculty Readings
6:00 – 7:00 pm...........Happy Hour
7:00 – 9:00 pm...........Network Banquet with reading by NC Poet Laureate Cathy Smith Bowers
9:00 – 10:00 pm.........Open Mike Readings

Sunday, November 7

7:30 – 9:00 am...........Continental Breakfast available
8:00 am – 1:00 pm.......Registration, Exhibitor Tables, and Book Sales tables open
8:00 – 9:00 am...........Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: Agents and Editors
9:00 am– 1:00 pm........Manuscript Mart* and Critique Service*
9:00 – 10:30 am.........Session IV Workshop Classes
10:30 – 11:00 am........Break
11:00 am – 12:30 pm...Session V Workshop Classes
12:30 – 1:00 pm.........Closing Remarks

*by prior appointment only


Faculty Biographies

Register online here | Download a registration form

Suzanne Adair

Suzanne Adair, a member of the Historical Novel Society, Mystery Writers of America, the North Carolina Writers’ Network, and Sisters in Crime, writes a historical mystery/suspense series. Her first book, Paper Woman, received the Patrick D. Smith Literature Award. Camp Follower was nominated for the Daphne du Maurier and Sir Walter Raleigh awards. Visit www.suzanneadair.com and www.suzanneadair.typepad.com for more information.

Margaret Bower

Margaret Bauer is the author of The Fiction of Ellen Gilchrist (University Press of Florida, 1999), William Faulkner’s Legacy: "what shadow, what stain, what mark" (University Press of Florida, 2005), and Understanding Tim Gautreaux (University of South Carolina Press, 2010). She has been the editor of the North Carolina Literary Review since 1997. She is a professor of English at East Carolina University, where she serves as coordinator of the literature faculty. She was named one of the ten ECU Women of Distinction in 2007, and was the recipient of the 2007 Parnassus Award for Significant Editorial Achievement given by the Council of Editors of Learned Journals.

Cathy Smith Bower

Cathy Smith Bowers was born and reared, one of six children, in the small mill town of Lancaster, South Carolina. She received her BA and MAT in English at Winthrop University in Rock Hill, South Carolina. She went on to do graduate work in modern British poetry at Oxford University in England.

Smith Bowers’ poems have appeared widely in publications such as the Atlantic Monthly,the Georgia Review, Poetry,the Southern Review, andthe Kenyon Review. She is a winner of the General Electric Award for Younger Writers, recipient of a South Carolina Poetry Fellowship, and winner of the South Carolina Arts Commission Fiction Project. She served for many years as poet in residence at Queens University of Charlotte, where she received the 2002 J. B. Fuqua Distinguished Educator Award. She now teaches in the Queens low-residency MFA program and at Wofford.

Smith Bowers is the author of four collections of poetry: The Love That Ended Yesterday in Texas, Texas Tech University Press, 1992; Traveling in Time of Danger,Iris Press, 1999; A Book of Minutes, Iris Press, 2004; and The Candle I Hold Up To See You, Iris Press, 2009.

In January 2010, Governor Beverly Perdue named Bowers as North Carolina’s fourth Poet Laureate, succeeding Kathryn Stripling Byer.

Jessie Carty

Jessie Carty’s poetry, fiction, and nonfiction have appeared in publications such as Iodine Poetry Journal, the Houston Literary Review,and Eclectica. She is the author of the full-length poetry collection Paper House (Folded Word, 2010) and the chapbooks The Wait of Atom (Folded Word, 2009) and At the A&P Meridiem (Pudding House, 2009). Carter works as a freelance editor, writer, and writing coach/teacher, in addition to teaching expository writing at Rowan Cabarrus Community College. She founded the literary magazine Shape of a Box, YouTube's first literary magazine, and currently edits and provides photography for the online journal Referential Magazine. Carter received her MFA from Queens University of Charlotte. She has been featured as a poet of the week on former Poet Laureate Kathryn Stripling Byer's blog. She is a member of the Association of Writers and Writing Programs, Charlotte Writer’s Club, NC Poetry Society, and the board of the Poetry Council of NC. You can find her around the Web but most often she is blogging at http://jessiecarty.com.

Chandler Chaytor

Chaytor Chandler is the legal assistant with National Gypsum Company in Charlotte, and a member of the Queens Writers’ Group, the South Iredell Scribblers, and the South Carolina Writers’ Workshop. As the owner and principal photographer for Nollamara Photography, Chaytor’s talents have been utilized by the South Carolina Writers’ Workshop in their publication, the Petigru Review, Vol. 1 and Vol. 3. Chaytor served as publisher and writer of the Executive Women’s Golf Association, Charlotte Chapter, newsletter, and has produced multiple travel and business articles and short stories. She recently completed the first draft of her thriller, Checkmate.

Dina Di Maio

Dina M. Di Maio is a Meredith College alumna and a licensed attorney in New York and Tennessee. With an MFA in creative writing from New York University, Di Maio has worked as a freelance writer and editor for publications and publishers like Glamour, Family Circle, and Scholastic, Inc. She also worked in the legal department of the Authors Guild and is currently a member of the Authors Guild.

Georgann Eubanks

Georgann Eubanks,author of the Literary Trails series published by the University of North Carolina Press, is a writer, teacher, and consultant with more than thirty years of experience in the nonprofit sector. Since 2000 she has been a principal with Donna Campbell in Minnow Media, LLC, an Emmy-winning multimedia production company that primarily creates independent documentaries for public television. Eubanks has taught creative writing as a guest artist in public schools and at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and presently serves as the writing coach for the Wildacres Leadership Initiative. After directing the Duke University Writers Workshop for twenty years, this year she launched the Table Rock Writers Workshop held in the fall at Wildacres Retreat. A graduate of Duke University, Eubanks is also a former chair of the NC Humanities Council and one of the founders of the NC Writers’ Network.

Nathan Ross Freeman

Nathan Ross Freeman is the writer, director, and producer of the independent feature film Mr. Bones, the official selection of twelve national and international festivals and winner of five first-place film festival awards. He is also the editor and co-producer of the feature documentary Authoring Action, named “Best Documentary” at the 2010 Swansea Bay Film Festival in the United Kingdom. Freeman has been an adjudicator for the NC Arts Council Playwrights/Screen Writer Fellowship, and spent fourteen years as a member of the intensive writing faculty at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. He currently serves on the NC Writers’ Network Board of Trustees.

Julie Funderburk

Julie Funderburk is poetry editor of storySouth, an online literary magazine, and she has previously served as managing editor of the Greensboro Review.Her poems appear in the anthology Best New Poets as well as Ploughshares, Blackbird, the Cincinnati Review, Smartish Pace, and elsewhere.She has been a Howard Nemerov Scholar at the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, and her work has been reprinted on Verse Daily. She is a faculty member of the English Department at Queens University of Charlotte, where she also works as a liaison promoting The Arts at Queens.

Judy Goldman

Judy Goldman is the author of two novels: Early Leaving and The Slow Way Back, which won the Sir Walter Raleigh Fiction Award and the Mary Ruffin Poole First Fiction Award. She’s also the author of two poetry collections, Holding Back Winter and Wanting to Know the End. She received the Hobson Prize for Distinguished Achievement in Arts and Letters, the Fortner Writer and Community Award for Outstanding Generosity to Other Writers and the Larger Community, and the Beverly D. Clark Author Award from Queens University of Charlotte.

Her book reviews have appeared in the Washington Post and the Charlotte Observer,her commentaries on public radio in Charlotte and Chapel Hill, her craft articles in the Writer, an excerpt from her memoir in progress in Real Simple magazine,and her poetry in the Southern Review,the Kenyon Review,the Ohio Review,the Gettysburg Review, Shenandoah, Prairie Schooner,and elsewhere.

Maureen Ryan Griffin

Maureen Ryan Griffin, an award-winning poetry and nonfiction writer, is the author of Spinning Words into Gold: A Hands-On Guide to the Craft of Writing, a grief workbook titled I Will Never Forget You, and two collections of poetry, This Scatter of Blossoms and When the Leaves Are in the Water. She offers individual coaching and critique, as well as an expansive selection of retreats, workshops, and classes, through her business, WordPlay (www.maureenryangriffin.com).

Aaron Gwyn

Aaron Gwyn is the author of the story collection Dog on the Cross (Algonquin Books), finalist for the 2005 New York Public Library Young Lions Fiction Award, and the novel The World Beneath, published in the spring of 2009 by W. W. Norton. His short fiction has been featured in Esquire, McSweeney’s, Glimmer Train, the Gettysburg Review, New Stories from the South, and other magazines and anthologies. He is an associate professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte where he teaches fiction writing and contemporary American fiction.

*full, registration closed*

Irene Honeycutt

Irene Blair Honeycutt is the author of four books. Her most recent poetry manuscript, Before the Light Changes (Main Street Rag Publishing, 2008), was one of two finalists in the 2009 Brockman-Campbell Book Award Contest, the award given annually for the book of poetry judged to be the best published by a North Carolinian in the preceding year. Her two other poetry books are Waiting for the Trout to Speak (Novello Festival Press, 2002), and It Comes as a Dark Surprise, winner of Sandstone Publishing’s Southeastern Poetry Contest in 1992. For her accomplishments during her long tenure at Central Piedmont Community College in Charlotte, she was awarded Teacher of the Year for Teaching Excellence. She founded and subsequently directed the college’s annual Spring Literary Festival for fourteen years. Upon her retirement in 2006, the college established the Irene Blair Honeycutt Distinguished Lectureship.

Marjorie Hudson

Marjorie Hudson is the author of Searching for Virginia Dare, a North Carolina Notable Book (North Carolina Arts Council), and Accidental Birds of the Carolinas, a Novello Literary Award Finalist, forthcoming from Press 53. Her writing has been published in Story, West Branch, the North Carolina Literary Review, the Rambler, and many other publications, and two of her fiction stories were Pushcart Prize Special Mentions. Hudson has been writer in residence at Headlands Center for the Arts (Sausalito, California) and Hedgebrook Retreat for Women Writers (Whidbey Island, Washington). She has led fiction and nonfiction writing classes in Creative Writing programs at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, East Carolina University (master's program), Duke University Continuing Education, and the MFA program at the University of Alaska Anchorage, NC Center for the Advancement of Teaching, and her own Kitchen Table Workshops. Her MFA is from Warren Wilson College.

Robert Inman

Robert Inman left a thirty-one-year career in television journalism in 1996 to devote full time to fiction writing. He is the author of four novels, all published by Little, Brown and Company: Home Fires Burning (1987), Old Dogs and Children (1991), Dairy Queen Days (1997), and Captain Saturday (2002). He is currently at work on a novel entitled The Governor’s Lady. Inman’s first stage play, the musical comedy Crossroads, had its world premiere in 2003 at Blowing Rock Stage Company, a professional theater in Blowing Rock. His playwriting credits also include The Christmas Bus, Dairy Queen Days, Welcome to Mitford, A High Country Christmas Carol, The Christmas Bus: The Musical, and The Drama Club.

Inman has written screenplays for six motion pictures for television, two of which have been “Hallmark Hall of Fame” presentations. His script for The Summer of Ben Tyler, a Hallmark production, won the Writers’ Guild of America Award as the best original television screenplay of 1997. His other Hallmark feature was Home Fires Burning, a 1989 adaptation of his novel.

Inman is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of Alabama with bachelor of arts and master of fine arts degrees. He is a member of the Authors Guild, Writers Guild of America, Dramatists Guild, PEN American Center, North Carolina Writers Conference, North Carolina Writers’ Network, and Alabama Writers Forum.

Lisa Williams Kline

Lisa Williams Kline is the author of three middle grade novels: Eleanor Hill, which won the North Carolina Juvenile Literature Award; The Princesses of Atlantis,which is in its fourth reprinting; and Write Before Your Eyes,from Delacorte Press. She has also published a nonfiction book titled Floods. Her stories for children have appeared in Cricket, Cicada, Spider, and Odyssey. Her stories for adults have appeared in about a dozen literary journals and anthologies, and an adult story collection titled Take Me was released in August 2010. She earned her MFA from Queens University of Charlotte.

   
Daniel Lazar

Daniel Lazar is a senior agent at Writers House, based in New York City. Some of the agency's best-selling authors include Ken Follett, Nora Roberts, Stephen Hawking, Michael Lewis, and Stephenie Meyer. Dan’s list includes adult and children’s fiction and prescriptive and narrative nonfiction. Some of his recent authors/titles include Rachel Renee Russell, New York Times best-selling author of Dork Diaries; Ingrid Law, New York Times best-selling author of Savvy and Scumble; Anne Fortier, author of Juliet; Janine Driver, New York Times best-selling author of You Say More Than You Think; and Jay Varner, author of Nothing Left to Burn. For more information, please visit www.writershouse.com.

Quinlan Lee

Quinlan Lee has been in the children’s publishing industry for the past ten years, having worked as both a writer and an agent. This unique perspective helps her understand the challenges of creating a strong opening scene and a strong bottom line. She is currently an agent with Adams Literary, a full-service boutique literary agency representing children's book authors and artists. She has published over thirty books with Scholastic, HarperCollins, and Simon & Schuster, including licensed projects for Clifford's Puppy Days, Dora the Explorer, and the Planet Earth Series.

Cynthia Lewis

Cynthia Lewis has been teaching Shakespeare, Renaissance literature, and creative nonfiction at Davidson College since 1980. Her reported essays concern American culture, including such topics as American women bodybuilders, spousal murder, professional gambling in Las Vegas, women’s obsession with shoes, and the world of debutantes. Her nonfiction has been published in Southern Cultures,the Antioch Review,the Massachusetts Review, Shenandoah, Charlotte Magazine,and elsewhere. Two of her personal essays have been included by the editor of The Best American Essays on the “Notable Essays” list.She is currently writing a book about sports and Shakespeare.

 

Michael Malone

Michael Malone is the author of eleven internationally acclaimed novels, including the classic Handling Sin, Uncivil Seasons, and The Last Noel. His latest novel, The Four Corners of the Sky, was a national best seller. He is currently at work on Dark Winter, the fourth book in his “Hillston” quartet.

He has also written plays; television programs for ABC, NBC, and Fox; a collection of short stories titled Red Clay, Blue Cadillac: Stories of Twelve Southern Women; and two books of nonfiction—one on film, one on Jungian typology. His many essays and literary reviews have appeared in such magazines and journals as Harper’s, the New York Times, the Washington Post, Playboy, Partisan Review, Yale Review, and the Wilson Quarterly.

Among his prizes are the O. Henry, the Edgar, the Writers Guild Award, and the Emmy for ABC's One Life to Live, where he was head writer for much of a decade. He has taught at Yale, the University of Pennsylvania, and Swarthmore, and is currently a professor of the practice in theater studies at Duke University, where he teaches film, television, and theater. He lives in Hillsborough with his wife, R. Florence Brinkley Professor of English Maureen Quilligan.

Sally McMillan

Sally McMillan is former publisher of East Woods Press, a company she sold to the Globe Pequot Press. She formed her agency in 1990 and represents fiction and nonfiction. She does not handle cookbooks, children’s books, paranormal, horror, erotic fiction, military fiction, science fiction, or fantasy. She represents Southern fiction, women’s fiction, and mysteries. She likes narrative nonfiction and practical nonfiction of all types. Her most prolific novelist is Lynne Hinton, who has twelve novels in print and two under contract. She also represents North Carolina literary novelist Nancy Peacock (whose recent memoir, A Broom of One’s Own,is about the dual roles of writing and housecleaning), among others. Representative nonfiction titles are The Complete Single Mother (now in its third edition); 20,000 Secrets of Tea; The Magic Teaspoon; The Gardener’s A-Z Guide to Growing Organic Food (now in its third edition); The Complete Guide to Edible Wild Plants, Mushrooms, Fruits, and Nuts; The Armchair Birder; and The Southern Gardeners’ Book of Lists.

Ashley Memory

Ashley Thomas Memory has more than twenty years of experience in writing, editing, media relations, and strategic communications. For the last five years, she has served as communications director for the Office of Undergraduate Admissions at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Prior to this position, she worked as director of public onformation for the NC Department of Transportation, the second-largest agency in state government. She has published essays and short stories in Cairn,the Portland Literary Review,the Georgia State University Review, North Carolina Wildlife, Romantic Homes, and more recently, for Ezine Articles and wikiHow. She is a two-time winner of the Doris Betts Fiction Prize and Eureka Literary Magazine nominated her short story “Tamarisk” for a Pushcart Prize. She recently signed a contract with Ingalls Publishing Group for the publication of her first novel, Naked and Hungry, which will be released in November 2011. When she’s not writing, Ashley is making crepes and managing World of Crepes (www.world-of-crepes.com), which receives more than five hundred unique visitors each day.

Dannye Romaine Powell

Dannye Romine Powell is the author of Parting the Curtains: Interviews with Southern Writers, based on her conversations about the creative process during her tenure as book editor of the Charlotte Observer from 1975–1992. She is currently a local news columnist for the Observer. She is also the author of three collections of poetry from the University of Arkansas Press, two of which have won the Brockman-Campbell Award. She has won fellowships in poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts and the NC Arts Council, and her poems have appeared in numerous literary magazines, including Poetry, the Paris Review, the New Republic, the Georgia Review, Shenandoah, and Ploughshares.

Amy Rogers

Amy Rogers is a founder and the publisher of Novello Festival Press, the award-winning independent press that has put more than three hundred writers into print since its founding in 2000. Rogers’s books include Hungry for Home: Stories of Food from Across the Carolinas and Red Pepper Fudge and Blue Ribbon Biscuits. Her work was included in Cornbread Nation 1: The Best of Southern Food Writing.Rogers is a frequent food and culture commentator for National Public Radio station WFAE. Rogers’s work has appeared in numerous publications, including design magazine American Bungalow, literary magazine the Oxford American,and the Charlotte Observer. She has been writer in residence at the Wildacres conference center and a program presenter at dozens of events, festivals, arts centers, schools, and other venues. A native of Detroit, Michigan, she makes her home in Charlotte.

Linda Rohrbough

Linda Rohrbough has been writing since 1989 and has more than five thousand articles and seven books to her credit along with awards for fiction and nonfiction. New York Times best-selling authors call Rohrbough a nationally recognized consultant on marketing a manuscript. Her latest book, coauthored with her surgeon, is Weight Loss Surgery with the Adjustable Gastric Band from Da Capo Press. Visit her Web site: www.LindaRohrbough.com.

Michael Shinn

Michael Shinn participated in several writing critique groups in Chapel Hill, Raleigh, and Statesville prior to organizing the South Iredell Scribblers in Mooresville seven years ago. He grew up on his family’s farm in Mooresville and earned a degree in English-Speech from Lenoir-Rhyne College in 1972, then taught college-preparatory English and coached the debate/speech team in the Iredell County school system for twenty years. He has been a National Humanities Center fellow and an Andrew W. Mellon Teaching Fellow at UNC-Chapel Hill, where he earned his master’s degree as well as a certificate of advanced studies in English. He has reviewed books for the Chapel Hill News, the Winston-Salem Journal, and the Southern Pines Pilot. Other work was accepted by the Pembroke Review and publications of the National Humanities Center. Currently, Shinn is the writing coordinator in the Academic Learning Center at the central campus of Central Piedmont Community College.

Betsy Thorpe

Betsy Thorpe has worked in the book publishing business for seventeen years. In New York, she was an acquiring and developmental editor in the adult trade departments of John Wiley & Sons, Macmillan Books, Broadway/Doubleday, and HarperCollins. For the last eight years, Betsy has operated a freelance editorial business, and co-written three published books. One of her freelance clients is Novello Festival Press, where she serves as marketing director. Betsy's latest book, 365 Nights: A Memoir of Intimacy, was featured in the New York Times and on The Today Show.

Banu Valladares

A native of Venezuela, Banu Valladares graduated with a master’s degree in English from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, where she taught composition. She moved to the Triangle in 2004 when she joined the Durham Arts Council as manager of the Creative Arts in Public and Private Schools (CAPS) program and community outreach. She came to the NC Arts Council in 2007 as the manager of cARTwheels, a statewide educational touring performing arts program, and is now the program director for literature, outreach, and cARTwheels. Banu has published a book of poetry, Gypsy Child. She’s also an actress whose film credits include Angelica’s Dreams, Generation Exile, Blood and Honey,and Roberto’s Dreams—all shot in Durham.

Kevin Watson

Kevin Morgan Watson is the founding editor of Press 53, a small, independent literary publishing company in Winston-Salem. As a publisher, he has worked with writers ranging from first-time published authors to winners of the National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize. As a writer, his short stories, poetry, and essays have appeared in numerous publications, including the 2002 TallGrass Writers Guild/Outrider Press anthology Take Two—They’re Small, where his short story “Sunny Side Up” won first prize. Kevin also serves as an advisor for student adaptation of short stories to screenplays with the screenwriting faculty at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, School of Filmmaking.

Kevin Winchester

Kevin Winchester grew up in Union County and continues to live in the Waxhaw area. He holds an MFA in creative writing from Queens University of Charlotte, where he studied primarily with Elissa Schappell, Pinckney Benedict, and Ron Rash. His short story collection, Everybody’s Gotta Eat, was published in August 2009. Other writings have appeared in Tin House Literary Magazine, Gulf Coast Literary and Arts Journal, BarrelHouse Magazine, StorySouth, Southern Hum, the anthology Everything But the Baby,and the Novello Festival Press anthology Making Notes: Music in the Carolinas. His agent is currently shopping his recent novel manuscript, On Trembling Ground. In 2005, Kevin was awarded the prestigious Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference Work Study Scholarship. Currently, he teaches creative writing and is director of the Writing Center at Wingate University.

 

Fall Conference 2010: Highlights

Register online here | Download a registration form

Friday, November 5

5:00 pm through Sunday—Exhibitor Tables open
Find out what’s going on in the literary world by visiting our exhibitors: magazines, publishers, literary and arts organizations, and other friends of writers. Trust us, you want to know these folks.

7:00 – 8:00 pm—Welcome Reception
Which would you rather do: hobnob with the writers, agents, editors, and other literary types attending the conference with you, or make fun of bankers? Don’t answer that. Just come to the reception.

8:00 – 9:00 pm—Keynote Address by Michael Malone
Michael Malone has written eleven internationally acclaimed novels, won the O. Henry and Edgar awards, appeared in periodicals from the Partisan Review to Playboy, and won an Emmy as head writer for One Life to Live. So the man knows his stories. Come hear what he has to say to his fellow North Carolina writers. Reception and book signing to follow.

Saturday, November 6

8:00 – 9:00 am—Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: “The Past, Present, and Future of Writing in North Carolina”
Celebrate the Network’s twenty-fifth annual Fall Conference with a discussion of where North Carolina writing has been, where it is, and where it seems to be going. This discussion is open to all conference registrants, except those registered for Sunday only.

12:30 – 1:30 pm—Luncheon with Literary Trails of the North Carolina Piedmont
Continue to celebrate twenty-five years of the Network with author Georgann Eubanks, who will offer an overview of her book, Literary Trails of the North Carolina Piedmont, with stories of writers, little known literary trivia, and the influence on literature of both our cotton mill culture and the institutions of higher education in the region, accompanied by images of Tar Heel literary sites between the mountains and the coastal plain.

1:30 – 2:30 pm—Third Annual Network Town Hall Meeting
If you have questions about the Network, then executive director Ed Southern has your answers. Plus, he won’t mind a bit if you leave the meeting early for …

2:00 – 3:00 pm—Literary Walking Tour with Georgann Eubanks
Georgann Eubanks, author of Literary Trails of the North Carolina Piedmont, will lead a literary walking tour through center city Charlotte. Seriously. I know, I’ve been there, and it’s hard for me to believe, too, but Charlotte wasn’t always steel-and-glass skyscrapers.

7:00 – 9:00 pm—Network Banquet with reading by NC Poet Laureate Cathy Smith Bowers
Cathy Smith Bowers led the poetry workshop at the Network’s 2009 Squire Summer Writing Residency. A few months later, Governor Beverly Perdue named Bowers our state’s new Poet Laureate. Coincidence? Well, yes, pretty much, but it’s still cool.

9:00 – 10:00 pm—Open Mike Readings
You know you want to.

Sunday, November 7

8:00 – 9:00 am—Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: “Agents and Editors”
If you have already written a best seller, or if your career model is Emily Dickinson, feel free to sleep in and skip this discussion. Otherwise …

12:30 – 1:00 pm—Closing Remarks
You don’t have to go home, but you can’t stay here.


Fall Conference 2010: Class and Workshop Schedule and Descriptions

Register online here | Download a registration form

Friday

5:00 – 9:00 pm Registration open
5:00 – 9:00 pm Exhibitor Tables open
5:00 – 9:00 pm Book Sales Tables open

7:00 – 8:00 pm Welcome Reception

8:00 – 9:00 pm Keynote Address by Michael Malone

9:00 – 10:00 pm Book Signing and Reception

Saturday

7:30 – 9:00 am Continental Breakfast available

8:00 am – 7:30 pm Registration, Exhibitor Tables, and Book Sales Tables open

8:00 – 9:00 am
Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion:
“The Past, Present, and Future of Writing in North Carolina”
Ed Southern, moderator
Dannye Romine Powell
Banu Valladares
How did North Carolina become “the writingest state”? How long will it stay “the writingest state”? What do today’s writers need to do to keep the tradition alive and prepare the way for the next generation? (Besides writing well, of course.) The Network’s executive director will discuss these questions and more with Banu Valladares, the literature director for the NC Arts Council, and author, poet, and Charlotte Observer columnist Dannye Romine Powell

9:00 – 10:30 am
Session I Workshop Classes

Promoting Yourself with Linda Rohrbough
It doesn't take a huge marketing budget to promote yourself like the pros do. There are a number of straightforward ways to get attention for a book without breaking your own budget. This workshop will show you the simple tips and tricks professional publicists use to get yourself seen in the marketplace and get your name known, as well as common mistakes first-time authors make in promoting themselves and how to get the very most out of the promotional efforts you choose to take on.

Poetry and the Passing Moment with Irene Honeycutt
In one of his poems, Charles Wright describes grief as “a floating barge-boat.” He then asks: “Who knows where it’s going to moor?” This metaphor is apt for poetry, which, when at its best, finds its mooring places. These places might be thought of as resting places. Or they could be quite turbulent. An important thing for the poet to learn is to let the poem lead, not rush it, or restrain it, or force it into an unnatural form. We must follow the poem as one follows a river. Irene will discuss various moorings her poems have found and will guide the group in a writing exercise, encouraging each person to encounter the Other, to moor, to shape their feelings in the moment.

Children’s Writers Workshop: Writing Well and Writing to Sell with Quinlan Lee
The children’s publishing world has never been more competitive, so how can a writer stand out from the crowd? By focusing on his or her craft, while still paying attention to the realities of what both publishers and readers are buying. This workshop will focus on market trends and timeless stories; what an editor and agent are looking for in a manuscript; and the importance of first pages, compelling plots, and unique voice.

Creating Archetypal Characters Instead of Stereotypes in Mystery and Suspense Fiction with Suzanne Adair
Thousands of years ago, storytellers from cultures all over the world enriched their fiction with archetypes: relatable, original, memorable characters from patterns in the unconscious mind. But today, plastic characters plague the publishing and movie industries. If your depictions lack dimension, join award-winning historical mystery/suspense novelist Suzanne Adair for a workshop on developing characters that are fully alive, fresh, and unique. To illuminate where the people of your fiction might lack breadth, Adair will discuss functions of major archetypes and how depriving your dramatis personae of these functions can result in lifeless, forgettable characters.

Manuscript Mart with Daniel Lazar, Quinlan Lee, Sally McMillan, or Kevin Watson

Critique Service with Margaret Bauer, Nathan Ross Freeman, Lisa Kline, Dannye Romine Powell, Amy Rogers, or Betsy Thorpe

10:30 – 11:00 am Break

11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Session II Workshop Classes and Session I Master Classes*

Creative Nonfiction Master Class: Plagiarizing From Real Life with Judy Goldman*
It was Mary McCarthy who said, “I can’t help plagiarizing from real life.” In this workshop, you’ll learn how to craft your personal essays or memoir into something of value for others. We’ll discuss finding your way into your voice, setting scenes as though you’re writing fiction, using vivid concrete details, and turning the people in your life into characters readers care about. Class will include exercises to help you discover your most engaging material. Send five pages maximum—double-spaced, twelve-point type or larger—no later than October 22 to the North Carolina Writers’ Network, PO Box 954 Carrboro, NC 27510. I’ll return these five pages to you with my detailed written comments at the workshop. Please bring twelve stapled copies of the same five pages to the workshop for in-class critique.

*by prior appointment only; see guidelines

Fiction Master Class: Who Is Your Book About? with Robert Inman*
This workshop will take a close look at how a strong, richly textured central character can drive a story, creating the stage on which other elements of storytelling exist: setting, other characters, plot, dialogue, etc. We’ll look at class participants’ work in the light of how their central characters exist and move about, bumping up against everything else in the story, making sparks, and making the story come alive and be memorable to the reader.

*by prior appointment only; see guidelines

Poetry Master Class: The Physiology of Sound with Cathy Smith Bowers*
It is not news that the sounds of words—vowels, consonants, stresses, etc—have an emotional effect on speaker and listener alike. But people are often surprised to learn that the sounds of words can also have a physical effect on the body. In this workshop we will take a writerly look at the physiology of sound so that we might begin to make more rational decisions in the diction and syntax of our own poems.

*by prior appointment only; see guidelines

Legal Issues for Writers with Dina Di Maio
This workshop will discuss copyright issues, including what rights publishers want and how to avoid an infringement lawsuit; contracts, including what clauses writers need to protect themselves; and libel and invasion of privacy, including how writers can avoid lawsuits pertaining to their writing. The seminar will focus on nonfiction (magazines, newspaper, books, the Web), poetry, memoir, and fiction (novel, genre, young adult, children's).

Situating the Writer in Creative Nonfiction with Cynthia Lewis
Whether in a memoir or a selection of reported nonfiction, the writer is present—somehow, to some degree. What are the options and strategies for placing the writer in a work of nonfiction, even if the pronoun “I” never appears? What are the purposes and effects of direct self-reference in various forms of nonfiction? Participants will be encouraged to read an essay in advance of the workshop that will provide points of departure for the group’s discussion.

Panel Discussion: Critique Groups with Michael Shinn and Chaytor Chandler
Michael Shinn, the organizer of Mooresville’s South Iredell Scribblers, and Chaytor Chandler will discuss guidelines and strategies that serve critique groups well. Whether you’re a part of a long-standing writers’ group or are looking to start a new group, this workshop will help you get the most out of your meetings.

Manuscript Mart/Critique Service

12:30 – 1:30 pm Luncheon with Literary Trails of the North Carolina Piedmont
Author Georgann Eubanks will offer an overview of her book, Literary Trails of the North Carolina Piedmont, with stories of writers, little known literary trivia, and the influence on literature of both our cotton mill culture and the institutions of higher education in the region, accompanied by images of Tar Heel literary sites between the mountains and the coastal plain.

1:30 – 2:30 pm Network Town Hall Meeting

2:00 – 3:00 pm Literary Walking Tour with Georgann Eubanks

2:30 – 3:00 pm Break

3:00 – 4:30 pm
Session III Workshop Classes and Session II Master Classes*

Creative Nonfiction Master Class with Judy Goldman*
See course description above.

Fiction Master Class with Robert Inman*
See course description above.

Poetry Master Class with Cathy Smith Bowers*
See course description above.

*by prior appointment only; see guidelines

Using Story in Poetry with Julie Funderburk
Many poets are inspired by memory. But sometimes, the story of the past can feel like cement shoes, dragging a poem down to the fishes. Using models, in this session we’ll track structures and strategies that keep memory-based poems from sinking. New energy and fresh approaches await. Bring one of your own for an exercise at the end.

Revision: The Art of Crafting and Critiquing Writing with Maureen Ryan Griffin
Want to make your writing “sing”? Wish your work would catch an editor’s eye? If you’ve ever wondered what you don’t know about improving the quality of your writing, or would like to contribute to other writers by providing a critique, this workshop is for you. You’ll receive a rubric that will serve as a guide to revise your own writing and to get and give feedback that provides maximum value. Ideal for individuals and for members of writing groups.

From Writer to Entrepreneur: How Building a Theme-Based Web Site Can Take You There with Ashley Thomas Memory
Tired of waiting weeks or months for responses to your query letters? Fill up the time by creating your own website for fun...and for profit. No matter what your passion—whether pets, travel, cooking, gardening, you name it!—Ashley T. Memory will teach you how to create a high-traffic and profitable website with little to no knowledge of technology. Today search engines and humans are looking for quality content, not flashy design. Who better to take advantage of this exciting new reality than a writer? In this informative and fun workshop, you’ll learn how to select a site concept, create high-value content pages, and build the kind of relationship with your visitors that will turn your website into a successful online business.

Manuscript Mart/Critique Service

4:30 – 5:00 pm Break

5:00 – 6:00 pm Faculty Readings

6:00 – 7:00 pm Happy Hour

7:00 – 9:00 pm Network Banquet
with reading by NC Poet Laureate Cathy Smith Bowers

9:00 – 10:00 pm Open Mike Readings

Sunday

7:30 – 9:00 am Continental Breakfast available

8:00 am – 1:00 pm Registration, Exhibitor, and Book Sales tables open

8:00 – 9:00 am
Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: “Agents and Editors”
Ed Southern, moderator
Daniel Lazar
Quinlan Lee
Sally Hill McMillan
Kevin Watson
They are editors and agents who’ve seen many manuscripts through to publication. You are writers with plans, hopes, or dreams of publication. Discuss.

9:00 – 10:30 am
Session IV Workshop Classes

“Writing by Heart” Writing Marathon, Part 1 with Marjorie Hudson
Working from prompts from great literature and from memory, we'll generate stories of love and courage from childhood, teen years, and adult rites of passage—all rich sources of both memoir and fiction material. Class participants will connect with each other in an atmosphere of support, get inspired by each other's work, and be encouraged on ways to continue the thread in further writing.

Publishing in Literary Magazines, Submitting to Literary Competitions with Margaret Bauer
Margaret Bauer, editor of the North Carolina Literary Review, will discuss submission guidelines, preparing manuscripts for submission, and cover letters; online and U.S. mail submission expectations; literary competitions; sending your new book to literary magazines for review consideration; corresponding with editors; and other questions posed by panelists regarding the publication process from submission through printing.

Fixing to Write and Fix Your Nonfiction with Ed Southern
To write nonfiction well requires curiosity, reliable facts, patience, interviewing skills, and a flair for good writing and colorful description. This workshop will encourage these and show examples of how to choose a subject and carry through a project to hopeful publication.

Know Your Character from the Inside Out with Kevin Winchester
You’ve heard it all before—develop realistic characters, let them tell the story, show how the story affects them. Sounds good, right? And yes, what draws us as readers to stories are usually the characters. So how do we create those characters for our stories? This workshop will discuss developing a “round” character, getting to know that character as author on a level that leads to interesting fiction, and methods for making that character “come alive on the page.” Attendees will be able to either develop a new character or flesh out an existing one during this workshop. They will also come away with a “character questionnaire” that helps create characters with built-in “story ready” tension and conflict.

Manuscript Mart/Critique Service

10:30 – 11:00 am Break

11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Session V Workshop Classes

“Writing By Heart” Writing Marathon, Part 2 with Marjorie Hudson
See course description above. Conference attendees can register for Part 1, Part 2, or both.

Something to Savor: Using Food in Your Writing with Amy Rogers
“Food is our common ground, a universal experience,” renowned chef and food writer James Beard has said. In this workshop, you’ll learn how to use your tastes, observations, and remembrances of food as powerful tools to engage your senses and deepen your writing. For writers of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry.

Fiction Workshop: Writing for the Plot with Aaron Gwyn *full, registration closed*
Aristotle in The Poetics famously listed “plot” as the most important element of drama. Yet it is precisely this element with which so many fiction writers struggle. Are there ways of strengthening our storytelling fundamentals before we ever put pen to paper or fingers to laptop? This writer believes so, and this workshop will devote its time to discussion, analysis, and generation of narrative structure(s). We'll talk about what makes a story “a story,” traditional form, and how to insure the conflicts that initiate any particular story follow organically to a climax and resolution.

I vs. Eye: Fact vs. Truth in Poetry with Jessie Carty
In this course we will discuss the difference between fact and fiction in poetry. Examples of how contemporary poets have shaped the facts of their lives into poetry will be reviewed as will the concept of persona poetry. Poets should bring their own poems to share. If possible each student should bring two poems (no longer than one typewritten page at standard twelve-point font) with one containing at least some fictional aspect and the other completely nonfiction. We will discuss as many poems as possible but time will also be left for an in-class writing exercise.

12:30 – 1:00 pm Closing Remarks


Master Classes

Register online here | Download a registration form

Master Classes offer intermediate and advanced writers a chance to delve more deeply into a particular genre. The Master Classes will take place during Sessions II and III and will be limited to fifteen registrants.

Saturday, November 6
11:00 am–12:30 pm and 3:00–4:30 pm

Creative Nonfiction Master Class: Plagiarizing From Real Life with Judy Goldman*
It was Mary McCarthy who said, “I can’t help plagiarizing from real life.” In this workshop, you’ll learn how to craft your personal essays or memoir into something of value for others. We’ll discuss finding your way into your voice, setting scenes as though you’re writing fiction, using vivid concrete details, and turning the people in your life into characters readers care about. Class will include exercises to help you discover your most engaging material. Send five pages maximum—double-spaced, twelve-point type or larger—no later than October 22 to the North Carolina Writers’ Network, PO Box 954 Carrboro, NC 27510. I’ll return these five pages to you with my detailed written comments at the workshop. Please bring twelve stapled copies of the same five pages to the workshop for in-class critique.

*by prior appointment only; see guidelines

Fiction Master Class: Who Is Your Book About? with Robert Inman*
This workshop will take a close look at how a strong, richly textured central character can drive a story, creating the stage on which other elements of storytelling exist: setting, other characters, plot, dialogue, etc. We’ll look at class participants’ work in the light of how their central characters exist and move about, bumping up against everything else in the story, making sparks, and making the story come alive and be memorable to the reader.

*by prior appointment only; see guidelines

Poetry Master Class: The Physiology of Sound with Cathy Smith Bowers *
It is not news that the sounds of words—vowels, consonants, stresses, etc—have an emotional effect on speaker and listener alike. But people are often surprised to learn that the sounds of words can also have a physical effect on the body. In this workshop we will take a writerly look at the physiology of sound so that we might begin to make more rational decisions in the diction and syntax of our own poems.

*by prior appointment only; see guidelines

Admissions

Participants are admitted on the strength of a writing sample submitted in advance of the conference. While publication credits are not required, you should submit a brief cover letter summarizing your writing background and highlighting publication credits if applicable.

Include a payment of $30 (nonrefundable processing fee).

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: October 18, 2010 (POSTMARK DEADLINE).

When you register for a Master Class, please choose another class as a back-up in case you are not admitted to the Master Class.

Submission Guidelines for Each Genre

  • Fiction. Submit a cover letter and no more than ten double-spaced pages of fiction, twelve-point type (short story or novel excerpt). Mail two hard copies to NCWN Fiction Master Class, PO Box 954, Carrboro, NC 27510.
  • Nonfiction. Submit a cover letter and no more than ten double-spaced pages of nonfiction, twelve-point type (essay or excerpt). Mail two hard copies to NCWN Nonfiction Master Class, PO Box 954, Carrboro, NC 27510.
  • Poetry. Submit a cover letter and no more than five single-spaced pages of poetry, twelve-point type. Mail two hard copies to NCWN Poetry Master Class, PO Box 954, Carrboro, NC 27510.

Two weeks before the conference, you will be notified about your enrollment status.


Manuscript Mart

Register online here | Download a registration form

Manuscript Mart provides writers with the opportunity to pitch their manuscripts and get feedback from an editor or agent with a leading publisher or literary agency. A one-on-one, twenty-five-minute pitch and Q&A session will be scheduled for you, to take place on Saturday, November 6, sometime between 9:00 am and 5:00 pm, or on Sunday, November 7, between 9:00 am and 1:00 pm.

Manuscript Mart sessions are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. You must register for Manuscript Mart by mail, with manuscript and payment enclosed, by a postmark deadline of October 18, 2010.

Guidelines

  • Submit a one-page query letter and twenty double-spaced pages of your fiction or nonfiction manuscript (for book-length projects, you must include a one-page synopsis of the work as a whole). You may include a book proposal as part of your twenty pages. Make sure your name is on each page of your submission. NUMBER YOUR PAGES.
  • All submissions must be double-spaced with twelve-point font on 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper with one-inch margins.
  • You must be registered for the conference for your Manuscript Mart session to be scheduled.
  • Download and print the Manuscript Mart cover sheet, which you may download from the online Registration Form at www.ncwriters.org. Mail it with two hard copies of your submission to:

North Carolina Writers’ Network
Fall Conference Manuscript Mart
PO Box 954
Carrboro, NC 27510

  • Checklist: two copies of manuscript; registration form; check to cover Manuscript Mart ($150) (and a separate check to cover all other conference fees if you are registering for the conference through the mail).

NOTE: If Manuscript Mart fills, your check will be returned to you.

Manuscript Mart Reviewers

From the names below, select your first, second, and third choice on your registration form. We will try to accommodate your first choice; if we cannot, we will select an appropriate editor or agent for you. You will be notified two weeks before the conference as to your assigned editor or agent, and the time and location of your session.

 
Manuscript Mart
Download a Manuscript Mart Cover Sheet

Saturday & Sunday, November 6 & 7

Daniel Lazar, Writers House literary agency (nonfiction, literary fiction)
Quinlan Lee, Adams Literary (children’s, young adult)
Sally McMillan, Sally Hill McMillan & Associates (fiction, creative nonfiction)
Kevin Watson, Press 53 (short fiction, poetry)


Critique Service

Register online here | Download a registration form

The Critique Service provides writers with in-depth literary critique of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and screenplays from a seasoned writer. A one-on-one, twenty-five-minute review session will be scheduled for you, to take place on Saturday, November 6, sometime between 9:00 am and 5:00 pm, or on Sunday, November 7, between 9:00 am and 1:00 pm.

Critique Service sessions are scheduled on a first-come, first-served basis. You must register for a critique by mail, with manuscript and payment enclosed, by the postmark deadline of October 18, 2010.

Guidelines

  • Submit twenty double-spaced pages of your fiction, nonfiction, or screenplay manuscript (for book-length projects, you must include a one-page synopsis of the work as a whole), or ten pages of poetry. Make sure your name is on each page of your submission. NUMBER YOUR PAGES.
  • All prose submissions must be double-spaced with twelve-point font on 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper with one-inch margins; poetry submissions should include no more than one poem per page.
  • Download and print the Critique Service cover sheet, which you may download from the online Registration Form at www.ncwriters.org. Mail it with two hard copies of your submission to:

North Carolina Writers’ Network
Fall Conference Critique Service
PO Box 954
Carrboro, NC 27510

  • Checklist: two copies of manuscript; registration form; check to cover Critique Service ($150) (and a separate check to cover all other conference fees if you are registering for the conference through the mail).

NOTE: If Critique Service fills, your check will be returned to you.

From the names below, select your first, second, and third choice. We will try to accommodate your first choice; if we cannot, we will select an appropriate critiquer for you. You will be notified two weeks before the conference as to your assigned critiquer, and the time and location of your session.

 

Critique Service
Download a Critique Service Cover Sheet

Saturday & Sunday, November 6 & 7

Margaret Bauer (fiction, nonfiction)
Nathan Ross Freeman (playwriting, screenwriting)
Lisa Williams Kline (children’s)
Dannye Romine Powell (poetry, fiction, nonfiction)
Amy Rogers (nonfiction, fiction)
Betsy Thorpe (nonfiction, fiction)



 
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