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Friday-Sunday
November 2-4
Embassy Suites
201 Harrison Oaks Blvd.
Cary, NC 27513
919-677-1840

 

When booking your reservation, use “North Carolina Writers’ Network Fall Conference” or the Group Code "NWN" for special conference rates.

 

 

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/2**

 

FEES AND DEADLINES | COMPLETE SCHEDULE-AT-A-GLANCE | CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS | WORKSHOP SCHEDULE AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

SESSION I | SESSION II | SESSION III | SESSION IV | SESSION V | MASTER CLASSES | MANUSCRIPT MART | CRITIQUE SERVICE | MARKETING MART | FACULTY BIOGRAPHIES

 

Fees & Deadlines

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/2**

 

 

Early registration: On-site registration:

Member Rates

  • $250 (includes meals)
  • $200 (without meals)
  • $200 (Saturday only, with meals)
  • $100 (Sunday only, without meals)

Nonmember Rates

  • $350 (includes meals)
  • $300 (without meals)
  • $300 (Saturday only, with meals)
  • $200 (Sunday only, without meals)

Other Fees

  • $30 for a Master Class
  • $150 for Manuscript Mart
  • $150 for Critique Service
  • $150 for Marketing Mart
  • $400 for members and nonmembers (does not include meals)

 

 

Scholarships

Limited scholarship aid is available for the Fall Conference. To apply, send your current CV and a statement of writing intent—describing your background and goals as a writer—to Ed Southern at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

In addition, the Mary Belle Campbell Scholarships and the Blonnie Bunn Wyche Memorial Scholarship are open to applications from poets who teach full-time, and women writers over the age of 50, respectively. For more information, please e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

The deadline for all scholarship applications is October 19.

 

Refunds and Cancellations

Cancellations must be made in writing and arrive at the Network by 5:00 pm on October 26, 2012, for you to receive a refund of the registration fee, less 25%. No-shows or cancellations after October 26 are nonrefundable.

Manuscript Mart, Critique Service, Marketing Mart, and Master Class fees are not refundable if you cancel. However, if we are not able to find a place for you in the Manuscript Mart, Critique Service, or Marketing Mart, we will return your check(s) for related extra charge(s).

Master Class application fees are nonrefundable, as they are administrative charges.

Send all refund requests to:

NC Writers' Network Refund
PO Box 21591
Winston-Salem, NC 27120

 

Deadlines

 

October 4

Deadline to reserve hotel rooms at low conference rate ($119 + tax; please click here to make your reservation at the Embassy Suites)

October 19 Deadline for scholarship applications (Fees & Deadlines)
October 26 Deadline for Master Class registration (see guidelines)
October 26 Deadline for Manuscript Mart / Critique Service / Marketing Mart registration (see guidelines)
October 29 Deadline for conference registration (5:00 pm by phone or mail; midnight if registering online). The first 12 Fall Conference registrants to mention this sentence at the registration table will receive a coupon for 10% off your next purchase from Quail Ridge Books or their website
November 2-4 Walk-in registration available on-site ($400, meals not included)
November 2-4 Fall Conference in session

 

 

For Writers with Special Needs

The North Carolina Writers' Network strives to make our programs and services accessible to all writers, including those with special needs. If you require conference materials either in large print or in Braille, or if you require a sign-language interpreter, please register for the conference and submit your request to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. no later than October 4. If you require any other special assistance, please let us know as soon as possible at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . We will do our best to accommodate all reasonable requests.

 

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Complete Schedule-At-A-Glance

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/2**

 

Friday, November 2

5:00 – 9:00 pm...........Registration, Exhibitor, and Book Sales tables open
7:00 – 8:00 pm...........Welcome Reception *Sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies *
8:00 – 9:00 pm...........Keynote Address by Edith Pearlman
9:00 – 10:00 pm.........Book Signing and Reception * Sponsored by FRESH Magazine *

 

Saturday, November 3

Sponsored by UNC-TV's North CarolinaBookwatch

7:30 – 9:00 am...........Continental Breakfast available
8:00 am – 7:30 pm......Registration, Exhibitor, and Book Sales tables open
8:00 – 9:00 am...........Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: "Writing for the Internet" with Ashley Thomas Memory, Alice Osborn, and Shane Ryan
9:00 am – 5:00 pm......Manuscript Mart, Critique Service, and Marketing Mart sessions*
9:00 – 10:30 am.........Session I Workshop Classes
10:30 – 11:00 am........Break
11:00 am – 12:30 pm..Session II Workshop Classes and Master Classes*
12:30 – 1:30 pm.........Luncheon featuring "An Overly Dramatic Discussion" with Rodrigo Dorfman, Ian Finley, Nathan Ross Freeman, and Ellen Shepard
1:30 – 2:30 pm...........Network Town Hall Meeting
2:30 – 3:00 pm...........Break
3:00 – 4:30 pm...........Session III Workshop Classes and Master Classes*
4:30 – 5:00 pm...........Break
5:00 – 6:00 pm...........Faculty Readings
6:00 – 7:00 pm...........Happy Hour
7:00 – 9:00 pm...........Network Banquet * Sponsored by Al Manning *
9:00 – 10:00 pm.........Open Mike Readings

 

Sunday, November 4

7:30 – 9:00 am...........Continental Breakfast available
8:00 am – 1:00 pm......Registration, Exhibitor, and Book Sales tables open
8:00 – 9:00 am...........Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: "Agents and Editors" with Ed Southern, moderator. Panelists: Ann Collette, Rees Literary Agency; Edward Graham, The Steinberg Agency; Nicole LaBombard, Rees Literary Agency; and Betsy Thorpe, Betsy Thorpe Literary Services
9:00 am– 12:30 pm.....Manuscript Mart, Critique Service, and Marketing Mart sessions*
9:00 – 10:30 am.........Session IV Workshop Classes
10:30 – 11:00 am........Break
11:00 am – 12:30 pm...Session V Workshop Classes
12:30 – 1:00 pm.........Closing Conversation

 

*by prior registration only

 

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Conference Highlights

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/2**

 

Not that the conference has any "low-lights," but here you go....

Friday, November 2

5:00 pm through Sunday—Exhibitor Tables open
This is your chance to chat with publishers, literary journals, support organizations, and other friends of writers.

7:00 pm—Welcome Reception
Sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies
You probably joined the Network in order to network; here’s where you get started.

8:00 – 9:00 pm—Keynote Address by Edith Pearlman
Edith Pearlman's short-story collection, Binocular Vision, was the first release by North Carolina's Lookout Books. Binocular Vision won the National Book Critics Circle Award and the ForeWord Book of the Year award, and was a finalist for the National Book Award. Edith will discuss how a lifetime of work went into her "overnight" success.

 

Saturday, November 3

Sponsored by UNC-TV's North CarolinaBookwatch

8:00 – 9:00 am—Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: “Writing for the Internet"
Our panel of experts will talk about how they have taken advantage of the opportunities writers can find online, and how they have crafted their writing for the wide, wide world of Web.

12:30 – 1:30 pm—Luncheon featuring "An Overly Dramatic Discussion"
Some of our state's leading playwrights and screenwriters will talk about how you can write for stage and screen from Tobacco Road, rather than Broadway or Sunset.

1:30 – 2:30 pm—Fifth Annual Network Town Hall Meeting
If you have questions about the Network, executive director Ed Southern has your answers. Or, he’ll make up something that sounds good.

7:00 – 9:00 pm—Network Banquet
Sponsored by Al Manning
Last year's banquet had writers dancing in the aisles. We're a little scared of what this year's banquet might bring.

9:00 – 10:00 pm—Open Mike Readings
C'mon, all the cool kids are doing it...

 

Sunday, November 4

8:00 – 9:00 am—Brilliant at Breakfast Panel Discussion: “Agents and Editors”
Need we say more?

12:30 – 1:00 pm—Closing Conversation
You don’t have to go home, but you can’t stay here.

 

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Workshop Schedule and Course Descriptions

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/2**

 

Saturday, November 3

Sponsored by UNC-TV's North Carolina Bookwatch

9:00 – 10:30 am: Session I Workshop Classes

The Second Log Line with Linda Rohrbough **Closed**
The secret to transitioning from a pre-published writer to a published writer is learning to talk about your work in an interesting way to people you don't know. Adding a second “log line” will give your book extra pizzazz when talking to agents and editors. In this workshop, Linda teaches how a strong log line (a one-sentence description of the book), followed by a second log line that takes into account the major change in the story, allows the writer to start a dialog with a publishing professional, and creates interest and identification in the listener or reader. Participants will leave this workshop with their own versions of a second log line and a plan for using it with an editor or agent.

Whose Story is It, Anyway? Using Point of View to Improve Your Fiction with Susan Woodring
Choosing a point of view for a story is arguably the most important decision a fiction writer makes. However, point of view—which includes perspective and a concept John Gardner termed “psychic distance”—is also among the most baffling aspects of fiction-writing. Using a variety of examples from both classical literature and contemporary fiction, Susan Woodring will discuss both the basics of the three main points of view (1st, 3rd limited, and omniscient) and how and when to use them.

Once Upon a Time: Using Fairy Tales to Jump-Start New Poetry with Maureen Sherbondy
Fairy tales appear everywhere: on television shows, in commercials, movies, and plays. It is no wonder that these tales also creep into poetry. This workshop will examine how fairy tales can be used to inspire new poetry that will fill us with wonder, fear, and enchantment. We will discuss props and emotional connectors employed in three different poems. We will also write a few poems of our own.

Food Writing 101 with Sheri Castle
In this overview seminar, Sheri will discuss how writing about food and foodways is different from other forms of professional writing. She’ll review both traditional and emerging outlets for food writing, from cookbooks to blogs to tweets. Sheri will give special attention to the art and craft of writing proper recipes and headnotes that are ready for publication.

10:30 – 11:00 am Break

11:00 am – 12:30 pm: Session II Workshop Classes

Master Class in Creative Nonfiction: Lyric Scene and Evocative Voice in Creative Nonfiction with Elaine Neil Orr
Creative Nonfiction, like fiction, usually tells a story; but whereas fiction depends on a strong plot line, CNF can distinguish itself through voice, lyricism, a feast of imagery. Indeed, one way to find the narrative arc of a story is to begin to distill one’s voice, one’s style. Sharpening one’s powers of observation is an excellent avenue to a distinctive style, whether a person is writing about dachshund, a trip to Spain, a major illness, a fishing expedition, or a walk across town while thinking about one’s divorce. In this workshop we will favor the close-up, and experiment with the smaller scale rather than the larger scale of “the WHOLE story.” We will borrow from lyrical moments in exemplary CNF essays as well as from poetry, documentary, and music. Observing and hearing from these sources, we will identify techniques with which to experiment. With these techniques, workshop participants will bring new life to their writing, find tantalizing ways of re-framing their stories, and free themselves to push a short scene into a lyrical riot. Participants can expect to leave the workshop with a flash memoir or a scene for a larger piece or a micro essay. Ultimately, the workshop will prepare participants to go back to a larger project with a firmer sense of how to claim and craft one’s material. Bring a photograph significant to you, a piece of music, two spices from your kitchen shelf (a teaspoon amount in a zip-lock bag will suffice).

Master Class in Fiction: Finding the Story with Jill McCorkle**Closed**
This advanced workshop for writers of fiction will combine discussion about style and structure with attention to participants’ individual manuscripts. Registrants should submit no more than 10 pages (12-point font, double-spaced) of fiction—if a sample from a longer work, submit the FIRST 10 pages from that work— as an attachment in MS Word to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . Registrants may also be asked to forward their manuscript to other Master Class participants prior to the conference.

Master Class in Poetry: Rhythm is the Name of the Game with Kathryn Stripling Byer
Novelist Harry Crews has said, “Rhythm is the name of the game for me. I like language, and I like the sound of it in my ears and on my tongue. When I'm writing, if a sentence doesn't want to have that kind of rhythm, doesn't want to feel like it's moving, undulating, I just change the damn sentence till I get it where it does.” No poet has said it better; just change “sentence” to “line” and you have my take on what poetry is all about. In this master class we will examine our poems as sound and rhythm. Participants will be asked to bring copies of one of their own poems, as well as one that, early on, spoke to them as rhythm and sound. This poem can be in any language. We will explore the connections between our own poetic rhythms and that of our “mentor-poem.”

Writing Funny with Shane Ryan
Comedy is one of the most rewarding and inspiring forms of writing, but it's also the most terrifying. An artist is never more exposed than when he or she tries to get laughs from a group of strangers, which is why most comedians are bosom buddies with fear and anxiety. Writing humor is a soul-wrenching challenge, but one that gets easier—and way more fun—with experience and confidence. In this workshop, Grantland’s Shane Ryan (That's me! I'm writing this!) will help you find your inner reservoir of comedic genius and produce hilarious content. After a brief talk on how to approach comedy through the principles of agreement and positive risk-taking, and how to deal with the pitfalls, such as angry internet commenters trying to ruin your self-esteem, participants will have 20-30 minutes to fine-tune their own material. Examples of strong humor writing will be used to help us along, and we'll spend the last 50 minutes talking about your work and laughing together. Afterward, you can ask me any question you want about comedy or my personal life or anyone else's personal life—I'll make up what I don't already know. Participants are encouraged to bring a rough draft of a humor piece to work on during the writing portion, or at least a good idea, since it's hard to be funny or even coherent in 20 minutes without a plan. Speaking of which, the end of this description garbled be a bit little may. See you there!

Memoir: Recreating a Past that is Vibrant and True with Paul Austin
To write a good memoir—one that is vibrant and true—we must shake off the habits that rob us of solid nouns and supple verbs. We can be too smart. Think too much. Write stale stuff. This will be a workshop: bring a couple of snapshots from the family photo album. We’ll do a series of exercises that will free us of the stagnant nouns and verbs that deliver stillborn sentences. Once we’ve put a few strong words on the page, we’ll arrange them into one true sentence. Maybe more. Let’s be greedy.

How to Work with an Editor (Maybe Even More than Once) with Ben George
A writer’s work doesn’t end at the post office or the "Send" button; editors need their writers to work with them to produce the best manuscript possible, whether for a magazine, an anthology, or the author’s own book. Ben George, of UNC Wilmington’s journal Ecotone and Lookout Books, will talk about what an editor needs from a writer, and what a writer can do to make an editor not want to punch them—and maybe even make the editor want to work with that writer again.

3:00 – 4:30 pm: Session III Workshop Classes

Master Class in Creative Nonfiction: Lyric Scene and Evocative Voice in Creative Nonfiction with Elaine Neil Orr
See above for course description.

Master Class in Fiction: Finding the Story with Jill McCorkle**Closed**
See above for course description.

Master Class in Poetry: Rhythm is the Name of the Game with Kathryn Stripling Byer
See above for course description.

Creating Complex Characters with Howard L. Craft
In this workshop, award-winning playwright Howard L. Craft gives you the ABC’s of how to get away from creating cardboard stock characters to creating complex human beings that pop on the page or stage. The workshop covers creating character bios, backstories, emotional histories, and other proven methods that give texture and character to your character.

How to Wow at an Open Mic with Jan Parker
From how to select your work to read at any given open mic, to what to wear, how to stand, how to deliver and how to wrap, Jan will entertain her class with both strategy-oriented pointers and tall tales of what not to do. Bring an open mind plus a few pieces of your original work, excerpts of your longer prose, flash fiction and/or poetry to practice reading in small groups and then, in front of the whole class. You'll be ready for the open mic(s) we’ll have at the end of the day—and you will WOW your audience!

Through the Eyes of a Child: Writing for Young People with Eleanora Tate
Like books written for adults, quality children's books and stories feature an appealing character, a conflict (even children's stories need drama!), a feasible plot (series of events that move the story forward), a distinctive setting, meaningful dialogue, a theme that’s not didactic, a point of view, a touch of humor, and perseverance. It’s one thing to describe them and quite another to write them! Eleanora E. Tate, an author of eleven middle-grade books of historical fiction, biographies, and realistic fiction, will offer workshop participants inspiration, information and exercises to jump start writing short stories, chapter books and middle-grade fiction. Come prepared to write.

Sunday, November 4

9:00 – 10:30 am: Session IV Workshop Classes

Genre Writing: Blending Character and Action with Clay and Susan Griffith
Genre fiction is about people doing things—hopefully exciting, mysterious, dangerous things. The trick is to keep the focus on the characters, even while they are accomplishing amazing feats that the average readers can't relate to. Whether the characters are in Dodge City or Mars or 1930s Los Angeles, the genre writer's burden is to make the extraordinary believable. And then make it even more extraordinary. In genre fiction, your main character can have emotional revelations and uncover psychological pain, like characters in literary fiction, but they really need to do it while running along a speeding train or wrestling a giant octopus.

Contrasting Images with Phillip Shabazz
In this workshop, we will explore several aspects of imagery, including works from other poets as examples. We will develop a list of descriptive words and images, as well as a list of words and images that are in contrast to the first list. Then we will utilize words from both lists to compose lines that show and tell the heart of our lyric or narrative free verse poem. We will have the opportunity to write a first draft, and also read aloud and share poems during the workshop.

Talk as Well as You Write: Tips for Being Interviewed with Nicki Leone and D. G. Martin
If you’re lucky, at some point in your writing career you’ll have to stop expressing yourself on the page, and express yourself in an interview. An interview can be a great opportunity to promote yourself and your work, and attract new readers; or, it can be a nerve-shredding nightmare. Nicki Leone, the managing editor of BiblioBuffet, and D. G. Martin, the host of UNC-TV’s North Carolina Bookwatch, will offer their tips and techniques for making your interviews the former, and not the latter.

Panel Discussion: The Pros of Self-Publishing with Stacey Cochran, Ed & Janet Howle, and Lewis Shiner
New technologies have made self-publishing more attractive than ever before, but the route is still full of pitfalls that can trap the unwary author. Before any authors decide to become publishers, they need to know exactly what they’re getting into—the opportunities and the dangers, the advantages and disadvantages. This panel features authors who have navigated the ins and outs of self-publishing, and have come out smiling.

11:00 am – 12:30 pm: Session V Workshop Classes

Bringing Up the Past: How To Write Historical Fiction with Anne Clinard Barnhill
This workshop will examine five aspects of writing historical fiction which will enhance the writer's work in this genre. Taking a look at the importance of facts in an otherwise fictional endeavor, working on dialogue that sounds right but not ridiculous, using the five senses to bring history "to life," discussing the importance of letting the reader in on "the truth," and asserting the importance of accuracy will be the areas in which we explore writing about history. We will also discuss the parameters of the genre itself and a few subgenres. No telling what we might dig up!

Writing Book Reviews to Elevate your Writing Career with Alice Osborn
What can network for you while you’re sleeping, help you edit your own prose or poetry, and significantly add to your publication credits? Why, writing book reviews, of course! If you’re not one of fortunate few who review books for an online or print publication, you can still review books for your blog. While you’re reviewing books, you’re building your writing credentials, expanding your networking sphere, and gaining a library of free books—a treasure for any writer. Join Alice Osborn, who currently reviews books for The Pedestal Magazine and her blog, as she discusses how to effectively review a book, along with the ethics of book reviewing, techniques for gaining readers for your reviews and handling time management, and other sticky situations. Be prepared for further enrichment with several hands-on exercises. All writers at all experience levels are welcome.

Writing Groups that Work with A.J. Mayhew
A good writing group can be the best help a writer could ask for; a bad group can stifle creativity. In this workshop, award-winning novelist A. J. Mayhew—a veteran of writing groups as participant and as leader—will talk about what makes some groups (and the writers in them) survive and thrive, while others disintegrate, die off, and discourage their members.

Music Writing with David Menconi and Peter Holsapple
It’s easy to love music, to listen to music, to talk about music with your friends. Writing about music, though, while maybe not quite as hard as making music, is tough. How do you capture the temporal, elusive, sometimes mysterious qualities of great music in the permanent, concrete clarity of great words? And then, how do you get other people to read your words? Music writer David Menconi and musician Peter Holsapple will talk about the challenges of writing about music, and the opportunities available for music writers.

 

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Master Classes

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/2**

 

Master Classes offer intermediate and advanced writers a chance to delve more deeply into a particular genre. Each Master Class will take place over the course of Sessions II and III, and will be limited to fifteen registrants.

Master Class in Creative Nonfiction: Lyric Scene and Evocative Voice in Creative Nonfiction with Elaine Neil Orr
Creative Nonfiction, like fiction, usually tells a story; but whereas fiction depends on a strong plot line, CNF can distinguish itself through voice, lyricism, a feast of imagery. Indeed, one way to find the narrative arc of a story is to begin to distill one’s voice, one’s style. Sharpening one’s powers of observation is an excellent avenue to a distinctive style, whether a person is writing about dachshund, a trip to Spain, a major illness, a fishing expedition, or a walk across town while thinking about one’s divorce. In this workshop we will favor the close-up, and experiment with the smaller scale rather than the larger scale of “the WHOLE story.” We will borrow from lyrical moments in exemplary CNF essays as well as from poetry, documentary, and music. Observing and hearing from these sources, we will identify techniques with which to experiment. With these techniques, workshop participants will bring new life to their writing, find tantalizing ways of re-framing their stories, free themselves to push a short scene into a lyrical riot. Participants can expect to leave the workshop with a flash memoir or a scene for a larger piece or a micro essay. Ultimately, the workshop will prepare participants to go back to a larger project with a firmer sense of how to claim and craft one’s material. Bring a photograph significant to you, a piece of music, two spices from your kitchen shelf (a teaspoon amount in a zip-lock bag will suffice).

Master Class in Fiction: Finding the Story with Jill McCorkle**Closed**
This advanced workshop for writers of fiction will combine discussion about style and structure with attention to participants’ individual manuscripts. Registrants should submit no more than 10 pages (12-point font, double-spaced) of fiction—if a sample from a longer work, submit the FIRST 10 pages from that work— as an attachment in MS Word to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . Registrants may also be asked to forward their manuscript to other Master Class participants prior to the conference.

Master Class in Poetry: Rhythm is the Name of the Game with Kathryn Stripling Byer
Novelist Harry Crews has said, “Rhythm is the name of the game for me. I like language, and I like the sound of it in my ears and on my tongue. When I'm writing, if a sentence doesn't want to have that kind of rhythm, doesn't want to feel like it's moving, undulating, I just change the damn sentence till I get it where it does.” No poet has said it better; just change “sentence” to “line” and you have my take on what poetry is all about. In this master class we will examine our poems as sound and rhythm. Participants will be asked to bring copies of one of their own poems, as well as one that, early on, spoke to them as rhythm and sound. This poem can be in any language. We will explore the connections between our own poetic rhythms and that of our “mentor-poem.”

 

Admissions

While publication credits are not required, Master Class participants should be experienced writers.

Please print and fill out the Master Class Cover Sheet, along with a brief cover letter, summarizing your writing background and highlighting publication credits (if applicable); a check for your $30 nonrefundable processing fee; and your manuscript sample, if required (please see Master Class course descriptions).

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: October 26, 2012 (POSTMARK DEADLINE).

When you register for a Master Class, please choose another class as a back-up in case you are not admitted to the Master Class.

 

Submission Guidelines for Each Genre

  • Fiction. Submit application and the FIRST ten double-spaced pages of your work of fiction, twelve-point type (short story or novel excerpt). Mail two hard copies to:

North Carolina Writers’ Network
NCWN Fiction Master Class
PO Box 21591
Winston-Salem, NC 27120

 

  • Nonfiction. Submit application and bring a photograph significant to you, a piece of music, and two spices from your kitchen shelf (a teaspoon amount in a zip-lock bag will suffice) to class.

 

  • Poetry. Submit application and bring one copy of one of your own poems and one copy of a poem that spoke to you, early on, as rhythm and sound, to class.

 

You will be notified of your enrollment status as soon as possible prior to the conference.

 

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Manuscript Mart

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/2**

 

Manuscript Mart provides writers with the opportunity to pitch their manuscripts and get feedback from an editor or agent with a leading publisher or literary agency. A one-on-one, thirty-minute pitch and Q&A session will be scheduled for you, to take place on Saturday, November 3, sometime between 9:00 am and 5:00 pm, or on Sunday, November 4, between 9:00 am and 12:30 pm.

Please note, a Manuscript Mart session can lead directly to publication—but don't expect it to do so. Think of it, instead, as a learning opportunity, and you'll get more out of it.

Manuscript Mart sessions are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. You must register for Manuscript Mart by mail, with manuscript and payment enclosed, by a postmark deadline of October 26, 2012.

 

Guidelines

  • Submit a one-page query letter and twenty double-spaced pages of your fiction or nonfiction manuscript (for book-length projects, you must include a one-page synopsis of the work as a whole). You may include a book proposal as part of your twenty pages. Make sure your name is on each page of your submission. NUMBER YOUR PAGES.
  • All submissions must be double-spaced with twelve-point font on 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper with one-inch margins.
  • You must be registered for the conference for your Manuscript Mart session to be scheduled.
  • Download and print the Manuscript Mart cover sheet, which you may also download from the online Registration Form at www.ncwriters.org. Mail it with two hard copies of your submission to:

North Carolina Writers’ Network
Fall Conference Manuscript Mart
PO Box 21591
Winston-Salem, NC 27120

  • Checklist: two copies of manuscript; registration form; check to cover Manuscript Mart ($150) (and a separate check to cover all other conference fees if you are registering for the conference through the mail).

 

NOTE: If Manuscript Mart fills, your check will be returned to you.

 

Manuscript Mart Reviewers

From the names below, select your first, second, and third choice on your registration form. We will try to accommodate your first choice; if we cannot, we will select an appropriate editor or agent for you. You will be notified as soon as possible before the conference as to your assigned editor or agent, and the time and location of your session.

Ann Collette, Rees Literary Agency (fiction, creative nonfiction)

Edward Graham, The Steinberg Agency (fiction, creative nonfiction)

Nicole LaBombard, Rees Literary Agency (fiction, creative nonfiction)

Betsy Thorpe, Betsy Thorpe Literary Services (fiction, creative nonfiction)

 

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Critique Service

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/2**

 

The Critique Service provides writers with in-depth literary critique of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama from a seasoned writer. A one-on-one, thirty-minute review session will be scheduled for you, to take place on Saturday, November 3, sometime between 9:00 am and 5:00 pm, or on Sunday, November 4, between 9:00 am and 12:30 pm.

Critiques are scheduled on a first-come, first-served basis. You must register for a critique by mail, with manuscript and payment enclosed, by the postmark deadline of October 26, 2012.

 

Guidelines

  • Submit twenty double-spaced pages of your fiction, nonfiction, or drama (for book-length projects, you must include a one-page synopsis of the work as a whole), or ten pages of poetry. Make sure your name is on each page of your submission. NUMBER YOUR PAGES.
  • All prose submissions must be double-spaced with twelve-point font on 8 1/2 x 11-inch paper with one-inch margins; poetry submissions should include no more than one poem per page.
  • Download and print the Critique Service cover sheet, which you may also download from the online Registration Form at www.ncwriters.org. Mail it with two hard copies of your submission to:

North Carolina Writers’ Network
Fall Conference Critique Service
PO Box 21591
Winston-Salem, NC 27120

  • Checklist: two copies of manuscript; registration form; check to cover Critique Service ($150) (and a separate check to cover all other conference fees if you are registering for the conference through the mail).

 

NOTE: If Critique Service fills, your check will be returned to you.

 

Critiquers

From the names below, select your first, second, and third choice. We will try to accommodate your first choice; if we cannot, we will select an appropriate critiquer for you. You will be notified as soon as possible before the conference as to your assigned critiquer, and the time and location of your session.

Virginia Boyd (fiction, nonfiction)

Linda Hobson (fiction, nonfiction)

Richard Krawiec (fiction, poetry, drama)

Robin Miura (fiction, narrative nonfiction)

Ross White (fiction, poetry)

 

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Marketing Mart

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/2**

 

Marketing Mart provides writers with an opportunity to create or refine an effective plan to pitch, promote, and sell their current, upcoming, or proposed books. The Network will schedule you a one-on-one, thirty-minute session with a publishing or bookselling professional, to take place sometime between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm on Saturday, November 3, or between 9:00 am and 12:30 pm on Sunday, November 4.

Marketing Mart sessions will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis.

You must register for Marketing Mart by mail, with $150 payment and submission (see below) enclosed, by the postmark deadline of Monday, October 26. If Marketing Mart is full, your payment and submission will be returned to you.

 

Guidelines

  • Registrants must submit the following:
    • A one-page synopsis of their book or manuscript
    • A one-page bio or CV of themselves
    • The first three pages of their book or manuscript
    • A check or money order, made payable to NC Writers’ Network, for $150
  • All submissions must be double-spaced, in 12-point font, on single-sided, 8.5 x 11 sheets, with one-inch margins (so the marketers have room for notes)
  • Indicate your first and second choices for your one-on-one session. You will be notified as soon as possible before the conference as to your assigned marketer, and the time and location of your session:
  • You must register for the Fall Conference to have a Marketing Mart session scheduled.
  • Download and print the Marketing Mart cover sheet, also available at www.ncwriters.org, and mail the completed form with two copies of your submission to:

    North Carolina Writers’ Network
    FC12 Marketing Mart
    P.O. Box 21591
    Winston-Salem, NC 27120

Questions should be addressed to Ed Southern at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

 

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Faculty Biographies

Register Online | Download Registration Form**Pre-registration is now closed. On-site registration available 11/2**

 

 

Paul Austin

Paul Austin’s essays have been published in Creative Nonfiction, The Gettysburg Review, Ascent Magazine, The Southeast Review, and Turnrow. Paul was awarded a fellowship at the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and has led writing workshops in Iowa, California, Ontario, and North Carolina. In 2008, W.W. Norton published his memoir Something For the Pain: One Doctors Account of Life and Death in the ER, to good reviews. The Boston Globe called it “a stunning account of the chaos in the emergency room.” The Library Journal gave it a starred review, calling it “A definite page-turner and a riveting debut. Highly recommended.”

Anne Clinard Barnhill

Anne Clinard Barnhill's first novel, At the Mercy of the Queen, was released in January 2012. Her chapbook, Coal, Baby, was released in March from Finishing Line Press. Her previous books include the memoir At Home In the Land of Oz: Autism, My Sister and Me and the short story collection What You Long For. Ms. Barnhill holds an MFA from UNC-Wilmington. Her stories have won awards and she is the recipient of several grants. Ms. Barnhill loves reading, playing bridge, dancing, tickling the ivories, and baking cookies with her grandchildren.

Virginia Boyd

Virginia Boyd’s first novel, One Fell Swoop, linked stories about the ripple effect of tragedy in a small town, earned her a debut author invitation to BookExpo America and a nomination for the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance Book of the Year Award in 2007. Also an award-winning writer for the Duke News Service, Boyd has taught a variety of creative writing workshops in fiction and nonfiction for both children and adults, including memoir and family history for Duke Continuing Education and advanced fiction writing for The Friday Center at UNC. Boyd lives in Durham, works for Carolina Wren Press, and is at work on her second novel, Gone to Graceland.

Kathryn Stripling Byer

Kathryn Stripling Byer served as North Carolina’s Poet Laureate from 2005 through 2009. She has published six collections of poetry, including Wildwood Flower, which won the Lamont Award (now the James Laughlin Award) from the Academy of American Poets, and Coming to Rest, for which she received the Hanes Award from the Fellowship of Southern Writers. Her new collection Descent will be published by LSU Press in the fall of 2012, when she will also be inducted into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame. She lives in the mountains of western North Carolina. Visit her website, www.kathrynstriplingbyer.com.

Sheri Castle

Sheri Castle is a professional food writer, recipe developer, recipe tester, and culinary instructor. Her book The New Southern Garden Cookbook: Recipes for Enjoying the Best from Homegrown Gardens, Farmers’ Markets, Roadside Stands and CSA Boxes was selected as the 2012 Cookbook of the Year by the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance (SIBA). It was also named a notable book by The New York Times and The Washington Post. Recipes and excerpts from the book have appeared in dozens of newspapers, magazines, and websites across the country. Sheri’s work has appeared in Southern Living, Better Homes and Gardens, Fine Cooking, People Country, WNC Magazine, Living in Style, Edible Piedmont, Edible Blue Ridge, Taste of the South, Cornbread Nation 3 and 4, Gilt Taste, USA Today, The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, The Times-Picayune, and numerous other magazines, cookbook anthologies, syndicated newspaper columns, websites, and blogs. She is a member of the Southern Foodways Alliance, the International Association of Culinary Professionals, Slow Foods USA, and the Carolina Farm Stewardship Association.

Stacey Cochran

Stacey Cochran is the bestselling eBook author of The Loneliest, In Love with Eleanor Rigby, The Colorado Sequence, and CLAWS. An excerpt from his current novel-in-progress Eddie & Sunny was selected as a finalist for the James Hurst Prize for Fiction by Ron Rash in 2011. Stacey graduated from East Carolina University with a M.A. in Creative Writing in 2001. In 2004, he was selected as a finalist in the St. Martin's Press/PWA Best First Private Eye Novel Contest. Stacey currently serves as chair for Bouchercon 2015, the World Mystery Convention, which will be held in Raleigh from October 8-11, 2015. He lives in Raleigh with his wife, Dr. Susan K. Miller-Cochran; their son Sam; and their daughter Harper. He teaches writing at North Carolina State University.

Ann Collette

Ann Collette was a freelance writer and editor before joining the Rees Literary Agency in 2000. Her list includes books by B. A. Shapiro, Mark Russinovich, Steven Sidor, Vicki Lane, Carol Carr, Clay and Susan Griffith, and Chrystle Fiedler. She likes literary, mystery, thrillers, suspense, vampire, and commercial women's fiction; in non-fiction, she prefers narrative non-fiction, military and war, work to do with race and class, and work set in or about Southeast Asia. Ann does not represent children's, YA, sci-fi, or high fantasy (Lord of the Rings-type books).

Howard L. Craft

Howard L. Craft is a poet, playwright and arts educator from Durham, N.C. He is the author of a book of poems, Across the Blue Chasm, and more than a dozen plays including The House of George, The Wise Ones, and Tunnels. He is also the writer and creator of the radio drama The Jade City Pharaoh, which airs on WUNC. Craft has twice won the N.C. Central University New Play Project and has received the N.C. Arts Council Playwriting Fellowship. His play The Wise Ones was selected as one of the Raleigh News and Observer’s top productions for 2005, and his most recent work, Caleb Calypso & the Midnight Marauders, was selected as one of the best scripts for the 2009 Theatre Season by the Independent Weekly. He lives in Durham.

Laine Cunningham

Laine Cunningham has been a publishing consultant and the owner of Writer's Resource for the past twenty years. Her clients consistently garner attention from the nation's top publishers and agents. Several of her clients' books have been shopped around Hollywood and received film options. She has been quoted on CNN Money, Media Bistro, The Writer magazine, and international media for her opinion on the end of the Harry Potter series, the "Oprah Effect," and Sarah Palin's ghostwriter. She has presented workshops and lectures for The Loft, the nation's largest independent literary organization; the National Writer's Union; The Writer's Workshop in Asheville, NC; and writing conferences across the country.

Rodrigo Dorfman

Rodrigo Dorfman is an award-winning filmmaker and multimedia producer who has worked with POV, HBO, Salma Hayek's Ventanazul, and the BBC, among others. His films have been screened at some of the top international film festivals in the world (Toronto, Full Frame, Edinburgh, Telluride, Human Rights Watch). With his father he has won best screenplay award from the Writer's Guild of Great Britain for Prisoners in Time. His screenplay Shaheed is currently in development with White Pine Pictures (Canada), with Jeremy Podeswa attached to direct. Rodrigo Dorfman recently won the Jury Award for Best Short at the Full Frame Film Festival. He is currently in post-production for his next feature documentary, Occupy the Imagination.

Ian Finley

Ian Finley serves as the 2012 Piedmont Laureate in the field of playwriting and screenwriting. He holds an MFA in Dramatic Writing from NYU, where he won the Harry Kondoleon Award for Playwriting. He is the author of several plays, including Jude the Obscure - Parts 1 & 2, 1960, Suspense, Giblet, Green Square and The Nature of the Nautilus (winner of the Kennedy Center’s Jean Kennedy Smith Award, 2000). His work on Burning Coal Theatre Company's series of site-specific historical plays about the history of Raleigh earned him special mention as “Tarheel of the Week” from the Raleigh News & Observer. Ian is also the author of a number of computer games, including Kaged, winner of the 2000 International Interactive Fiction Competition.

nathan ross freeman

Nathan Ross Freeman is an author, director, screenwriter, and producer. His feature film Mr. Bones was an official selection of 12 national and international film festivals, and won five Best Feature awards. His documentary Authoring Action, in distribution on DVD, won Best Feature Documentary at the 2010 Swansea Bay Film Festival in Swansea, Wales. He has taught at UNC-Charlotte and at Salem College, and lives in Winston-Salem.

Ben George

Ben George is editor of Ecotone and a former editor at Tin House. He has worked for Random House and Harcourt, as well; stories and essays he has edited have won the Pushcart Prize and the O. Henry Prize, and have been reprinted in Best American Short Stories, Best American Mystery Stories, Best American Essays, Best American Nonrequired Reading, and New Stories from the South. His published interviews with writers such as Anita Desai, W. S. Merwin, Andrea Barrett, Margot Livesey, Peter Ho Davies, and Rick Bass appear or are forthcoming in Tin House, Fugue, and the Believer. Ben’s own work has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and for Best New American Voices, and his stories, essays, and journalism have appeared in Ninth Letter, Tin House, Gulf Stream, Boise Weekly, and elsewhere.

Edward Graham

Edward Graham has been with The Steinberg Agency since 2010. His interest in publishing began with an editorial internship at Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, where he was able to work under editors Chuck Adams and Kathy Pories. After he graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, he moved to New York to pursue a career in publishing, and has been working with Peter Steinberg since. Edward is primarily interested in fiction, ranging from speculative to literary and commercial, although he will also consider compelling narrative nonfiction and memoirs.

Clay and Susan Griffith

Clay and Susan Griffith are writers who have been married for over 15 years. They are the co-authors of the VAMPIRE EMPIRE trilogy: The Greyfriar, The Rift Walker, and The Kingmakers, published by Pyr Books. Paul Goat Allen, the sci-fi/fantasy moderator of B&N.com, referred to VAMPIRE EMPIRE as “the future of genre fiction.” In addition to prose, Clay and Susan have written many comic books over the years, including The Tick, Bart Simpson, and Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. More recently, they’ve written Allan Quatermain and Vincent Price Presents: The House of the Raven, both of which have been adapted into audio dramas. Clay and Susan also script and contribute to the tv/web show Monster Creature Feature (www.mcftv.com). Clay is a native of Raleigh and a graduate of N.C. State University. Susan is from the Hudson Valley of New York. She is a graduate of SUNY-Albany, and has lived in the Raleigh area for more than 25 years.

Linda Hobson

Linda Hobson, the author of a book on novelist Walker Percy and editor of a second, has a Ph.D. in English from the University of Alabama and is a graduate of both Denison and Duke. She is at present an editor and book reviewer. Hobson has edited many published works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry as well as taught writing to adults and to secondary- and university-level students. Her literary interests are southern fiction, American fiction, creative nonfiction, and English/British literature.

Peter Holsapple

Peter Holsapple has been a four-decade banquet of opportunities and surprises. He was a founding member of the seminal N.C. band the dB’s, and has recorded with bands such as R.E.M. and Hootie and the Blowfish. His songs have been covered by the Troggs, Nada Surf, Foster & Lloyd, and the Golden Palominos. He’s played the Apollo Theatre and the Ryman Auditorium. He contributed to the New York Times online songwriter’s blog, Measure for Measure, as well as pieces in several books on music. Peter is a charter member of Radio Free Song Club, a magnificent new songwriters' collective. He considers himself among the luckiest people on Earth.

Ed and Janet Howle

Prior to becoming writers, Ed and Janet Howle had several other careers, none of which contributed to their decision to write fiction. It has been their life experiences that provide material for their writing. Their debut novel is based on their around-the-world antique car rally, travels in Asia, and years of living in Paris. In addition, Ed and Janet are avid ocean sailors. Their novel-in-progress is set on a sailboat in the Bahamas. At this point in their lives, they divide their time between their home in North Carolina, sailing, and international travel.

Richard Krawiec

Richard Krawiec has published two novels, a story collection, two books of poetry, and four plays, as well as Young Adult biographies, and book reviews and feature articles for national publications. He has won fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the North Carolina Arts Council (twice), and Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. His work appears in Shenandoah, sou'wester, Witness, Cream City Review, Florida Review, West Branch, NC Literary Review, 2Rivers View, Connotation, and dozens of other literary magazines. He has edited anthologies featuring the work of Dorianne Laux, Marge Piercy, Reynolds Price, Lee Smith, Allan Gurganus, Elizabeth Spencer, Fred Chappell, Kathryn Stripling Byer, Joe Millar, Michael Chitwood, Jaki Shelton Green, and others. He is the founder of Jacar Press, a Community Active Press.

Nicole Labombard

Nicole LaBombard is a literary agent with the Rees Literary Agency in Boston. Established in 1983, the Rees Agency represents leading authors including Siobhan Fallon, Alan Dershowitz, and Jack Welch. Nicole has a BA in English from Dartmouth College and represents a variety of fiction and nonfiction. She is currently expanding her client list with particular interest in historical fiction, literary/commercial fiction, young adult, narrative nonfiction, health/fitness, and contemporary military.

Nicki Leone

Nicki Leone showed her proclivities early on when as a young girl exchanged the jewelry a well-meaning relative had given her for Christmas for a dictionary. She supported her college career with a part-time job in a bookstore, or perhaps it would be more accurate to say that her college career and attendant scholarships and financial aid loans supported her predilection for working as a bookseller. She has been in the book business for over twenty years. Currently she works for the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance, developing marketing and outreach programs for independent bookstores. Nicki has been a book reviewer for several magazines, her local public radio station and local television stations. She is currently the Managing Editor at BiblioBuffet.com and serves on the Board of Trustees of the North Carolina Writers' Network.

D.G. Martin

D.G. Martin is host of UNC-TV’s North Carolina Bookwatch, the state’s premier literary series. His weekday radio program on WCHL in Chapel Hill has aired his interviews with hundreds of authors. About 40 North Carolina newspapers carry his weekly newspaper column that features books, politics, and related topics. He co-authored the North Carolina entry in the Encyclopedia Britannica, and has written numerous book reviews and feature articles for journals and magazines. One feature series for Our State became his book Interstate Eateries, with a second edition published in 2008. He is a former member of the NCWN Board of Trustees.

A.J. Mayhew

Anna Jean (A. J.) Mayhew’s first novel, The Dry Grass of August, won the 2011 Sir Walter Raleigh Award for Fiction, and is a finalist for the 2012 Book Award from the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance. A Blackstone Audio book came out in December, and the French translation was published in April. The novel will also be translated into Italian, Turkish, and Norwegian for release in 2013. In February, A. J. was a featured speaker at Southern Voices in Birmingham, AL, along with novelist Scott Turow. Last September, she dined with Governor Beverly Perdue at a gathering to honor North Carolina authors, and is now working on her next novel, Tomorrow’s Bread.

Jill McCorkle

Jill McCorkle is a professor in the MFA in Creative Writing program at N.C. State. A member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers, McCorkle has the distinction of having published her first two novels on the same day in 1984. Since then, she has published three other novels and four collections of short stories. Five of her eight books have been named New York Times notable books. Her stories have appeared in The Atlantic, Ploughshares, Oxford American, Southern Review and Bomb Magazine, among others. Four of her stories have appeared in Best American Short Stories and several have been collected in New Stories from the South. Her story, "Intervention," is in the most recent edition of the Norton Anthology of Short Fiction. McCorkle has received the New England Book Award, The John Dos Passos Prize for Excellence in Literature and the North Carolina Award for Literature. Her new novel Life After Life will be published in the spring of 2013. She lives with her husband in Hillsborough.

Ashley Memory

Ashley Memory is the creator and writer behind World of Crêpes (www.world-of-crepes.com), a website dedicated to crêpe recipes that receives nearly 1,000 unique visits per day. She founded the website in 2009 and sold it for profit in 2011 but retained the rights to her e-book, The Essential Guide to Crêpes. Memory has published essays and short stories in a number of publications, including Cairn, Portland Literary Review, Wildlife in North Carolina, and Romantic Homes. Her first novel, Naked and Hungry, which was published by Ingalls Publishing Group in November 2011, was named one of the season's most promising debut novels by Library Journal. She lives in Pittsboro, N.C. and is currently employed as a communications director at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

David Menconi

David Menconi has been the music critic at the News & Observer in Raleigh since 1991—which makes him one of the few remaining members of a dwindling species, fulltime arts reporter at a daily newspaper. His writing has also appeared in Spin, Billboard, the New York Times, Salon.com, Our State magazine and a host of other publications that regrettably no longer exist. He has written two books, including this year’s Ryan Adams: Losering, A Story of Whiskeytown. Menconi has a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Texas; an English degree from Southwestern University; and a diploma from a fully accredited high school.

Robin Miura

Robin Miura has worked in publishing for 12 years, first as a production editor for Oxford University Press and for the past nine years as a freelance editor, proofreader, publishing consultant, and writing coach for publishing companies and individual authors. She has worked with all types of books—from academic and educational to self-help—but her passion is literary fiction and creative nonfiction. Robin has edited a novel and memoir series for Press 53 and edited the two most recent Fred Bonnie Award–winning novels for River City Publishing, Shrapnel by Marie Manilla and Girl from Soldier Creek by Patricia Foster. You can find out more about Robin and her work at www.the-efa.org/dir/memberinfo.php?mid=7947.

Elaine Neil Orr

Elaine Neil Orr writes memoir and fiction. She is an award winning professor of world literature and creative non-fiction at N.C. State University. She also serves on the faculty of the low-residency MFA Program at Spalding University in Louisville. Her memoir, Gods of Noonday: A White Girl’s African Life, was a Book Sense Top-20 selection and nominee for the Old North State Award. Elaine has won fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the North Carolina Arts Council and is honored by Image as Artist-of-the-Month for her story, “Day Lilies.” Her memoir and short fiction have appeared in The Missouri Review, Shenandoah, Blackbird, and Prime Number, among other places, and she has three times been nominated for the Pushcart Prize. Her historical novel, A Different Sun, will be released by Penguin/Berkley Books in spring 2013. A daughter of missionary parents who was born and grew up in Nigeria, Elaine Orr writes out of the inheritance of two worlds.

Alice Osborn Alice Osborn, M.A, is the author of three books of poetry: After the Steaming Stops, Unfinished Projects, and Right Lane Ends; she is also a manuscript editor, freelance writer, and storyteller. A former Raleigh Charter High School English teacher, Alice has served as a Writer-in-Residence in the United Arts Artists in the Schools program since 2009, and has taught creativity, poetry, memoir, and blogging workshops to Triangle residents for six years. Her work has appeared in Raleigh’s News and Observer, Soundings Review, and in numerous journals and anthologies. She lives in Raleigh, North Carolina, with her husband and two children. Visit her website: www.aliceosborn.com.

 

Jan B. Parker Artist and author Jan B. Parker lives and works in Fuquay-Varina. Her fiction has appeared in the 2009 Press 52 Open Awards Anthology as First Place Novella, the 2011 Broad River Review as A Rash Award Short Story Finalist, and in Main Street Rag, MoonShine Review, LitSnack; Grey Sparrow Journal; The Best of the Fuquay-Varina Reading Series, Pear Noir!, and will be featured as first place winner in the upcoming Manzanita Press 2012 anthology, Wine Cheese and Chocolate. Jan is a trustee of the North Carolina Writers’ Network and hosts the popular Third Thursday Open Mic, three years long and strong, in her hometown. Please visit her website www.writerjanbparker.com.

 

Edith Pearlman

Edith Pearlman is the recipient of the 2011 PEN/Malamud Award for excellence in the art of short fiction. Her most recent collection, Binocular Vision: New & Selected Stories (Lookout 2011), won the National Book Critics Circle Award, ForeWord Book of the Year, and the Julia Ward Howe Prize and was named a finalist for the National Book Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and The Story Prize. She has published more than 250 works in national magazines and anthologies, including Best American Short Stories, The PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories, New Stories from the South, and The Pushcart Prize, and three previous story collections: Vaquita, Love Among the Greats, and How to Fall. She lives in Brookline, Massachusetts.

 

Shane Ryan

Linda Rohrbough has been writing since 1989, and has more than 5,000 articles and seven books to her credit, along with national awards for her fiction and nonfiction. New York Times #1 bestselling author Debbie Macomber said about Linda’s new novel: “This is fast-paced, thrilling, edge-of-the-seat reading. The Prophetess One: At Risk had me flipping the pages and holding my breath.” The Prophetess One: At Risk recently won three national awards: the 2012 International Book Award, the 2011 Global eBook Award and the 2011 Millennium Star Publishing Award. An iPhone App of Linda’s popular “Pitch Your Book” workshop is available in the Apple iTunes store. Visit her website: www.LindaRohrbough.com.

Shane Ryan

Shane Ryan is a writer for Grantland.com, Paste Magazine, and Carolina Public Press. He has written about sports, music, film, politics, and comedy for a variety of publications, including McSweeneys.net. No matter where he writes, he expends a lot of effort trying to be funny, and has embarrassed himself publicly so many times that he is now considered an expert. His biggest fans include his mother, who thinks he's especially hilarious when asking for money. Shane grew up in Saranac Lake, New York, graduated from Duke University in 2005, lived in Brooklyn for five years, and attended the UNC School of Journalism in 2010. He lives in Carrboro with his wife, and is two months away from turning 30, which is not funny at all.

Phillip Shabazz

Phillip Shabazz is the author of two collections of poems, Freestyle and Visitation and XYZoom, and a novel in verse, When the Grass Was Blue. His poetry has been included in the anthologies, Literary Trails of the North Carolina Piedmont: A Guidebook and Home Is Where: African-American Poetry from the Carolinas. His poems have appeared in The American Voice, Obsidian, and The Louisville Review, among other publications. He has been Artist-In-Residence of the Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture at Duke University, and for many years has led poetry workshops in schools, libraries, universities, and cultural centers throughout North Carolina.

Ellen L. Shepard

Ellen L. Shepard, a native of Los Angeles, is a professional screenwriter and playwright. A member of the WGA, she has developed screenplays for Universal Pictures, Blake Edwards Entertainment, and Par Par Productions. Shepard is a noted playwright and director, with plays having been produced in Los Angeles. She studied writing with Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Paul Zindel at the Actors Studio West, who said of her work, “At no time since I've been here (at the Actor's Studio), through all our sessions, did my mind ever have to shift into any critical mode... You just have total confidence in what you're doing here.” She is currently an Assistant Professor of Film and Interactive Media at St. Augustine's University in Raleigh, where she developed their BA degree in Film 14 years ago. Her writing classes include Intro to Screenwriting, Feature Screenwriting I & II, Character Development, and Playwriting.

Maureen Sherbondy

Maureen Sherbondy's books are After the Fairy Tale, Praying at Coffee Shops, The Slow Vanishing, Weary Blues, and Scar Girl. She recently won the Spring Garden Press Robert Watson Poetry Award for The Year of Dead Fathers. The book will be published this summer. Her full-length collection, Eulogy for an Imperfect Man, is forthcoming from Brick Road Poetry Press. Her fiction has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She received an MFA from Queens University of Charlotte. Maureen lives in Raleigh with her three sons. Her website is www.maureensherbondy.com.

Lewis Shiner

Lewis Shiner’s books include Dark Tangos, Black & White, Say Goodbye, the award-winning Glimpses, and the career retrospective Collected Stories. All of his work is available for free download at www.fictionliberationfront.net or in print from Subterranean Press.

Eleanora E. Tate

Eleanora E. Tate is a folklorist, short story writer, journalist, and author. Her children's books have won Parents Choice Awards, are ABA Pick of the Lists, are Notable Children's Trade Books, and one is a Child Study Committee Children's Book of the Year. Two are audio books and another is an award-winning television film. A former NCWN board member, a veteran writing workshop conductor, and a seminar leader over the years for the North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teaching, among others, her newest book is Celeste's Harlem Renaissance (2007). Ms. Tate is an instructor with the Institute of Children's Literature, and on the faculty of Hamline University's Master's Degree-seeking low-residency program “Writing for Children and Young Adults” in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Betsy Thorpe

Betsy Thorpe has been in the book business for 20 years, working in the adult trade departments as a developmental and acquisitions editor at Atheneum, HarperCollins, Broadway Doubleday, Macmillan, and John Wiley & Sons. Since leaving New York, she founded Betsy Thorpe Literary Services, an independent book consultancy, where she works with authors on their book projects, helps with pitches and finding agents, and pulls together independent editorial teams and designers for self-publishing. She has co-written four books, three of which have been featured in The New York Times.

Ross White

Ross White is the executive director of Bull City Press and the editor of Inch, the tiny magazine of short poetry and microfiction. With Matthew Olzmann, he edited Another & Another: An Anthology from the Grind Daily Writing Series, which collects the work of 47 emerging poets. His work has appeared in New England Review, Poetry Daily, The Southern Review, and Greensboro Review, among others. He co-founded The Hinge Literary Center, which serves writers in the RTP area, and teaches creative writing in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has won the Charles Shull Prize for Traditional Poetry and the James Larkin Pearson Prize for Free Verse from the Poetry Council of North Carolina, a Peer Award from Boxcar Poetry Review, and several scholarships from the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference.

Susan Woodring

Susan Woodring is the author of a novel, Goliath (St. Martin’s Press, 2012) and a short story collection, Springtime on Mars (Press 53, 2008). Her short fiction has appeared in Isotope, Passages North, turnrow, and Surreal South, among other anthologies and literary magazines. Her work has twice been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and her short fiction was shortlisted for Best American Non-Required Reading 2008 and Best American Short Stories 2010. Susan currently lives in western North Carolina with her two children and her husband. For more information about Susan and to read her blog, please visit www.susanwoodring.com.

 

 

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Support for the 2012 Fall Conference is provided by the NC Arts Council, UNC-TV North Carolina Bookwatch, the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, and the William M. Hendricks Family Foundation.

 

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